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Building my own 3 point lift for my Case 646 loader.
A few questions?

Will factory cylinders from other models work? I see some on Fleabay for sale but from other models like a 220, 444, 446 series.

Do these cylinders have down pressure? I only see one hydraulic line one them in their pictures. I have never seen one in person.
 

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The cylinders most commonly found on e-bay that are from parted out Case tractors are the mid-lift cylinders. Yes, they are double-acting. These cylinders have a shorter stroke than the true OEM 3 point cylinder. Therefore, you will not get as much travel out of the arms on your 3-point hitch. Since you are designing and constructing a complete hitch, you might be further ahead in choosing a non-OEM cylinder and then adjusting your hitch design to accommodate the longer cylinder and different type of mounting.
 

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If I recall correctly, the stroke is 6" on the 3 point cylinder but that's based on the diameter of the cylinder.

Part of this is about "leverage" because the hitch is expected to lift a certain amount of weight off the ground. The larger the diameter of the cylinder, the less leverage required and therefore a shorter stroke cylinder could be used.
 

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I was under the impression the factory 3-point hitch was 3" bore x 4" stroke. The factory cylinders are relatively expensive from what I've been told. There is a 3" bore x 4" stroke cylinder that sells on Ebay for around $100 the last time I looked. The bottom mount will have to be changed to match the cylinder. Also on the Yahoo group Case gt site, there is a write-up by some guy named Tom Arnold :wink: that answers a lot of questions before you start building. Never mind... I reread the first post, 646 -I was thinking it said 446, sorry :oops:
 

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Dredging up an older post here. I need a consensus on the bore and stroke of the 3 pt cylinder. Is it 3 x 4? 3 x 6? Other? I am going to build my own 3 pt hitch, so I can accomodate other than stock mounting requirements for the cylinder, but I need to know what the original is so I can duplicate lifting ability and lift range. I have inquired about some of the JD cylinders currently listed on Evilbay, and have received responses that they are a 2.5 inch bore, which would result in a lower lift capacity if the OEM Case cylinder is in fact a 3 inch bore. Help please!
 

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Call Ted at 414-507-4334 and tell him you want a JD steering cylinder. He's located in Milwaukee and sells them on ebay from time to time. I don't recall the specific dimensions but it has the same bore/stroke as the Ingersoll cylinder and will work fine if you can modify the mounting system to provide a bit more space between the mounting pin locations.
 

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I don't know if Ted is the same one, but I have seen a link on this site that leads to a JD cylinder on Ebay, currently BIN is $99.75. I can get a tie rod cylinder for half that if I knew what the bore and stroke was. I could use the savings to buy a selector valve. Working with a tight budget here. :think:
 

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I just checked the dimensions on my cylinder and they are 3" bore and 4.25" stroke. Since you are building a hitch from scratch you could use a different size cylinder as long as you position the attachment points to provide the desired range of travel for the lift arms.
 

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There seems to be an ample supply of affordble deck lift cylinders out there. There is one on eBay now for $25 BIN. Has anyone considered using 2 belly lift cylinders (one on each side) and moving the rod attachment points inboard to compensate for the shorter stroke? The cylinders could be plumbed in parallel.
 

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ING6018 said:
There seems to be an ample supply of affordble deck lift cylinders out there. There is one on eBay now for $25 BIN. Has anyone considered using 2 belly lift cylinders (one on each side) and moving the rod attachment points inboard to compensate for the shorter stroke? The cylinders could be plumbed in parallel.
That would work, though lifting and lowering would be a tad slower due to the increased volume of 2 cylinders. Another drawback would be the more connections you have, the more chances you have for a leak. I think I'll just stick with one.
 

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Really the cylinder can be whatever you want it to be. I would just use a deck lift cylinder as they are cheaper and more readily available. Since you are custom making it you can adjust the lift points to compensate for the shorter stroke so you still get the lift you need. You can use two if you want to-I don't think you are going to have that much of a slower stroke out of it either.
 

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Im bring this thread back from the dead because I am in the beginning stages of making my own sleeve hitch which I want to control using a hydraulic cylinder. Finding the OEM 3 pt ones is impossible and I really dont want to guess at the aftermarket ones. We have a lot of new members here since this topic was active so hopefully I can get more feedback on this subject. Currently, I have a mid mount cylinder from a 646 that I could technically use but as we already know, it does not have the stroke that the OEM ones has which can reduce the range of motion IF its not mounted correctly.
Another option is the John Deere 318 style lift cylinder. They fetch about $100 right now and I thin they have a 3-4" stroke. I'm still trying to confirm this.


I could also go with an electric actuator but getting a good quality one that can lift at least 500 lbs is going to cost a few hundred dollars. Going with a hydraulic cylinder will require two hoses and two T fittings which will cost $100. Add a cylinder into that and I am already at $200-$250. yes, still cheaper than the cost of the linear actuator but I would still need to get over this hurdle of finding the correct cylinder.


So, I am looking for your feedback on this as I know I am not the only one who would like to make their own 3 pt or sleeve hitch that operates on its own

FWIW, the only things I will be hooking up to the sleeve hitch will be a dump cart, landscape trailer, small plug aerator, and a weight box in the winter. I just want the hitch to work on its own during the mowing season.

Correct me if i am wrong but would I be able to retain the full range of travel on the hitch using a mid mount cylinder IF I made the sleeve hitch longer by a few inches? The OEM sleeve hitch is 18" long and pivots on the flanges on the rear axle. Maybe I can make the arms 4" longer to gain move travel???????
 

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CASE 220/4 said:
Im bring this thread back from the dead because I am in the beginning stages of making my own sleeve hitch which I want to control using a hydraulic cylinder. Finding the OEM 3 pt ones is impossible and I really dont want to guess at the aftermarket ones. We have a lot of new members here since this topic was active so hopefully I can get more feedback on this subject. Currently, I have a mid mount cylinder from a 646 that I could technically use but as we already know, it does not have the stroke that the OEM ones has which can reduce the range of motion IF its not mounted correctly.
Another option is the John Deere 318 style lift cylinder. They fetch about $100 right now and I thin they have a 3-4" stroke. I'm still trying to confirm this.

I could also go with an electric actuator but getting a good quality one that can lift at least 500 lbs is going to cost a few hundred dollars. Going with a hydraulic cylinder will require two hoses and two T fittings which will cost $100. Add a cylinder into that and I am already at $200-$250. yes, still cheaper than the cost of the linear actuator but I would still need to get over this hurdle of finding the correct cylinder.

So, I am looking for your feedback on this as I know I am not the only one who would like to make their own 3 pt or sleeve hitch that operates on its own

FWIW, the only things I will be hooking up to the sleeve hitch will be a dump cart, landscape trailer, small plug aerator, and a weight box in the winter. I just want the hitch to work on its own during the mowing season.

Correct me if i am wrong but would I be able to retain the full range of travel on the hitch using a mid mount cylinder IF I made the sleeve hitch longer by a few inches? The OEM sleeve hitch is 18" long and pivots on the flanges on the rear axle. Maybe I can make the arms 4" longer to gain move travel???????
I am in the process of building a three point hitch now for a 648. I have a cylinder I am going to adapt but not really sure of the stroke. My understanding is the 648 does not require T-fittings for the hoses. I have a set of lower links off on older tractor. I am planning on adjusting the length of the rod that connects to the upper lifting arms to control the lift range.
 

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my design will not have adjustable turn buckles. I do not need the adjustability from each lift arm. I just need an up and down motion. let us know how your progress goes with your build.
 
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