Case Colt Ingersoll Tractors banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The lift cylinder on a 3PT hitch is leaking at the rod seal. Is there a fix or a suitable replacement available. I know I could get an OEM part but it would probably cost me an arm and a leg. I only have one leg now so I just don't want to take a chance. :sidelaugh: :sidelaugh:

Ted
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,618 Posts
Look in the Parts Manuals and you will see how easy it is to dismantle that cylinder. Just use some care in removing any burrs from the spots where the cross-pin goes through the bottom of the cylinder. Once you have it apart, take the pieces to any hydraulics shop and they will sell you new O-rings and seals for it. You won't even have to give up a finger, let alone an arm or a leg.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hydriv said:
Look in the Parts Manuals and you will see how easy it is to dismantle that cylinder. Just use some care in removing any burrs from the spots where the cross-pin goes through the bottom of the cylinder. Once you have it apart, take the pieces to any hydraulics shop and they will sell you new O-rings and seals for it. You won't even have to give up a finger, let alone an arm or a leg.
Thanks Tom,
I thought it was all sealed up. I didn't look, :oops: :oops: :oops:

Ted
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,618 Posts
Ted,
Once you remove the cylinder from the hitch, it is a good idea to dangle the two hoses into a bucket to drain the oil. Stick a screwdriver through the hole in the top of the rod and pull the rod upward in the cylinder all the way to force most of the oil out. Make sure that the ends of your hoses are not immersed in the oil in the bucket or you will suck oil back up those lines when you are performing this draining technique. Then push the rod all the way into the cylinder to force the oil out of the lower part. Do this a couple of times


Pull the rod upward all the way out of the cylinder and then carefully remove any paint that is on the end of the rod by using coarse steel wool. You don't want to damage the hard chrome in a way that will allow rust to form. Then inspect the hole in the top of the rod on both sides of it for any burrs or rough edges. Careful use of a small file is one way to remove those burrs. Another way is to use an appropriately over-sized drill bit that is chucked into a drill press to remove the burrs. You just touch the outer edges of the holes with the spinning drill bit ever so lightly.

Now go to the bottom of the cylinder and clean up the burrs on the cross-pin holes there. You can use Plumber's Emery Cloth to remove the paint that is below the "foot" that closes up the bottom of the cylinder. Once all the paint is removed (within reason), then wipe some oil on this area. The ideal hammer would be a brass mallet but a standard 2 LB sledge hammer will suffice. Collapse the rod into the cylinder until it bottoms out on the foot. Then tap the top of the rod with hammer blows that are square to the rod to minimize damage to the top of the rod.

You want to extract the foot slowly; not drive it out in a single blow. Ease up on the force of your hammer blows as the foot exits the cylinder. You want the foot to essentially fall away from the cylinder. Once it is free, put a screwdriver back into the top hole of the rod and pull the rod all the way up. Now, inspect the area below where the foot used to reside for any burrs etc and use the Plumber's Emery Cloth to remove any roughness that your fingers detect. Wipe the area clean with a cloth and then oil it. Push the rod all the way down to the bottom of the cylinder until it is flush with the top of the cylinder body. You can use a large punch or a piece of steel/brass/aluminum round rod to move the piston/rod assembly the balance of the way. If you feel the need to clamp the cylinder in a bench vise, then apply the pressure to the TOP of the cylinder and never to middle or bottom of the cylinder because you may distort the cylinder. This would cause the piston to bind in the out of round area and the cylinder would then be junk.

With the cylinder now dismantled, you can take the parts to a hydraulics shop to obtain the proper seals and O-rings. Replace them all because you now have it apart. Everything must be washed scrupulously clean using clean solvent. Do not use rags to wipe out the inside of the cylinder or any parts that are going to end up inside the cylinder. Rags often leave lint residue behind and that residue is all it takes to wreak havoc with a holding valve or other component. If you have to use anything, then use a paper towel but using nothing is better. Once the seals and O-rings are in place, then dip the parts in clean oil and let the oil run off of them while you are sliding the rod/piston assembly carefully back into the cylinder. It is important that the very top of the rod be free of any distortion marks from the hammer blows or you will wreck the top seal of the cylinder. The chamfer on the top of the rod must be intact so that the seal is not damaged when the rod slides through it. Once the rod/piston is back in place, then you line up the foot with the cylinder and push it in. Keep your eye on the cross-pin holes as they relate to the hole in the foot for the hydraulic line. This is not a hard job to perform but you have to be meticulous as to how you go about it so that you do not damage anything in the process.
:thumbsup: :thumbsup:
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top