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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had a leaky valve cover gasket this summer that caused a lot of grass and dust to accumulate on my engine, creating heat issues. I was short on time, so I took it to the local lawn and garden shop where they replaced the gasket and cleaned up the engine. They told me they expected the heat problems to be corrected by the cleaning. But, the engine still seems to get really hot. I have an infrared thermometer ordered and I'll check the temps as soon as it comes in. I can say that the engine gets hot enough in about 10 minutes of running that it's difficult to check the oil and the oil hardly sticks to the dipstick.

Based on the length of time the tractor was at the shop, I suspect their cleaning consisted of spraying a degreaser on the engine and then giving everything a good spray down with a hose. All the visible surfaces are very clean, but I'm doubting they went to lengths to clean the blower housing. I'm thinking I need to get into the blower housing and give it a good degreasing. When I noticed the oil leak earlier, the oil was running down the back of the engine, and I suspect it was probably getting sucked into the blower. The problem is that the blower is on the back of these engines (towards the driver), which makes it really tough to access it. Does anyone know a good way to get to the blower housing? Can I pull out the hydraulic reservoir without having to drain it?

On a related note: The mechanic who worked on the engine said there should be a heat shield bolted on between the muffler and the engine. There are bolt holes in the engine shroud that do look like they might be meant to hold a shield. But, I know my tractor didn't have one when I got it from the original owner and I've checked all the photos of similar Ingersolls, and none of them have one. Does anyone know if these were every manufactured with that shield?

Thanks,
 

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https://casecoltingersoll.com/showthread.php/90515-Need-18hp-Vanguard-Engine-Help

This thread has a summary of some thoughts for accessing the "tins" on a Vanguard.

Basically - slide the engine forward, remove two bolts that hold the pump adapter to the flywheel - leave all hydraulic lines hooked up. More fiddly than it sounds in those short instructions.

There was no heat shield on mine. Bob MacGregor suggests fabing one to mount between the electric PTO and the muffler, which seems to me to be a good idea.

With Respect, Willy
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Fortunately, when the infrared thermometer gun I ordered arrived, it showed that my engine was running at the normal temps - I wasn't looking forward to sliding the motor around to get at the blower.

Thanks for the help!
 

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For consideration;
When I pulled the engine to replace it, it appears that the suction from the fan on the flywheel sucked grass into the stator and that allowed grass to cake onto the stator and flywheel. There was always some oil film on components in the tower - I have wondered if some droplets were sucked into the flywheel/stator and exacerbated the problem. Also the tractor was used to mow without the bottom plastic shield under the frame in place for a while while bagging which I suspect allowed dry grass to be pulled in easier.

It is a PITA to pull the engine (probably took me about 4 hours as I did not know what I was doing and stopped to take many pics along the way. Thanks to Earthenstrings and Bob MacGregor for their posts explaining it.

Not knowing what conditions your tractor has been operated in, you may not have that problem. That said, even though it may be a headache to get to it, it could be a good thing to do.

Here are some pics of the accumulation before and one of the flywheel after.

With Respect, Willy
 

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Willy,

Good point :thumbup: I'm not saying that is not bad, but I have seen far worse :shock: The magnets were completely hidden and crud built up on the flat center section of the flywheel. The only thing I could see of the stator was some shiny copper with the varnish worn off :shock:The tractor was still charging, so after a good cleaning, I coated the copper with long wear nail polish.

:cheers:
Gordy
 
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