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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I installed new bushings and donor axles on my 646 as the original axles were badly grooved.

The short axle fits fine.

The long axle was not clearing the inside bushing on the bottom left corner.

In the process of eliminating variables I have removed the outer seal as well as the inner bushing. The axle is still favoring one side of the bore.




If the axle was bent then I would expect the gap to change when I rotate the axle. Also, both the replacement and old axle appear to align the same way.

Next would be removing the outer bushing, but I can’t see how that could be installed crooked.

Is there a problem in the casting? Or is it a problem with my installation?


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You're right, it must be a misalignment or displacement between the centers of the bore in the outer bushing and the innner bore. Either 1 of 3 things: 1. Misalignment/displacement in the casting (factory machining error or axle tube bent) 2. The hole in the bushing itself is somehow bored off center or crooked. 3. The bushing isn't sitting flat, it's pressed in crooked.

None of these three things strikes me as common. I'm presuming it was simply a little crooked when you took it apart. So you could probably put it back together a little crooked. I'd surmise the easiest fix would be to have a custom bushing made with an off-center hole in it.

Just my opinion.
 

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1973 Case 444, 1974 Case 644, 1976 Case 446, 1977 Case 646
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I would think if the axle spline lines up during assembly there would be no problem. Have you tried to slide the axle into the gear cluster yet?

Keep the Peace
Harry
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I would think if the axle spline lines up during assembly there would be no problem. Have you tried to slide the axle into the gear cluster yet?

Keep the Peace
Harry
Good call Harry. I’ll try that.


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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
…I'm presuming it was simply a little crooked when you took it apart. So you could probably put it back together a little crooked...
You might be right on it being crooked to begin with. It was a year ago when I took it apart, memory is a bit foggy. When I look at the old 1975 bushing I can see marks from the axle splines. I’m thinking that I must have had to drive the axle out.




Just wondering how much extra wear I will cause by ‘forcing’ it together and running it crooked.


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Seems to me that this is likely a machining error from the original manufacturing process, as long as you can get both axles into the differential and things turn smoothly without and binding I would not worry too much about it. If it really bothers you these axle housings are fairly easy to find at a reasonable price it seems.

Bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It’s interesting. When I have the inner bushing pulled out I can get the axles to mesh with the gear cluster, but it doesn’t go in easy. This seems to center it in the bore, but it really binds when I try to spin it. The only thing for it to be binding on is the outer bushing. The other side fits better and turns with little effort.

The outer bushing seems to be fully seated, but I don’t have a good way to assess the alignment.

I’m torn at this point. If it just needs a minor adjustment then I’ll run it. Perhaps a general machine shop could lightly ream one or both of the bushings to make it work.

The other option as mentioned by Bob is to abandon this rear end and go with a different unit. I have a parts 78 446, that has the bell style ends. I’d need to get seals for it and I’d be walking away from the brand new seals and bushings I just installed on the original rear end.

In hindsight, I should have test fit the axles after installing the new bushings. I skipped that step and went straight to paint. That way I wouldn’t have got so far down this road.


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I would pretty much guarantee that the casting itself is probably ok. There are some areas around the top of the casting that don't look zackly right. More and likely they are sand defects or repairs to the mold. Believe or not it does wear out. The land around the through hole for the axle it appears to be wider on the right than on the left. Plus the spline marks in the old bushing don't extend the full length of the ID of the bushing. These two combined lead me to think that the axle through hole is not drilled perpendicular to to the face. If I had to bet that when this was machined there were chips / debris in the work holding causing the casting to be incorrectly positioned during machining. Especially since you said the old axle and the new axle exhibited the same condition.
 
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