Case Colt Ingersoll Tractors banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
650 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What would be necessary to bench test engines? Sounds like dumb question however I have never fired up a small engine other than what was mounted in a rider or GT frame. I recall from HS sho days we had these heavy steel plated tables that had mounting holes and were massivly heavy (that was a "few" years ago).

How stable would a test "bench" need to be? what's the preferred way of fastening the engine down, any special considerations. I'm visualizing issues like vibration, venting fumes but having not done this before I trying to get an idea of what i need before I go out and build something that is too heavy or not strong enough, tell me what I should do.

Perhaps better put, for those who have tested or ran an engine by it's self, how did you do it (safely)? I have this nightmare vision of a running engine bouncing around my garage.... :shock:

I have a Kohler twin magnum (and possibly an Onan) that I need to work on to see if they run and short of any major rebuilding I don't have a tractor to put them in (yet).

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
877 Posts
Last weekend I dug out an old HH120 that my brother had traded to me about 10 yrs ago. It has a 1/4" plate bolted underneath of it. I just had it sitting on the sleeve hitch of my 444 and it did just fine. That IS NOT recommended, but it really doesn't take a whole lot to hold 'em in place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
877 Posts
now to finish my post,(had food on stove to attend to). If I were to make it a habit of wanting to bench test engines my ideal situation would be use an old Murry or Craftsman, some old junker that was free, and set it up with a piece of 1/4" plate that I could drill mounting holes in to hold the motor and attach it to to the old frame. You would have a gas tank, battery, and starting system at hand. Another reason that would be good for me is that my garage is attached to the house. I could work in the comfort of my garage, then push it outside to start it up and not stink up the humble abode. Keeps the wife happy also.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
261 Posts
It shouldn't take much. Just bolt or lag bolt it down to a piece of plywood. I'd do it on your concrete block table. Your not going to have the fan or clutch on it and just keep important things away from the flywheel.
What were you cooking Billy, goat?
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top