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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have 2 case 446 rear ends being made into an articulating 4WD mini tractor. I would like to know the specs on the hydraulic motors that power the rear ends. They are made by TRW ROSS. The spec number on both are MAB24001. The Code numbers are 262 85 and 075 83. One is from an 83 model year 446 and the other from an 85 model year. I specifically need to know the max rated operating pressure, max rated rpms, and the amount of oil requires per one motor revolution in cu./revolution. Thanks for any help that I can receive.
 

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I put those specs in safe place, no idea where that is now. One day, I will find again. I know that our system use half or less than the flow they are capable of. I think the pressure is around 2500psi. The series had higher pressure, but the MAB24001 has a large ge-rotor set. Actually, the motors on the 200 series have a higher pressure rating.
You can just use same pump (0.61 cu-in) and connect is series. Axles should be equal distance from hinge point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
THANKS for your reply. Are you indicating the 446 hydraulic pump puts out .61 cu in/revolution? If so, that would equal to 9.5 gpm at 3600 rpm (the max rpm spec on the attached web sight spec sheet}. The same spec sheet on line for a 446 hydraulic pump flow indicates 8 gpm. (May be at 3000 rpms}

Hopefully the spec sheet will surface. I like designing with actual numbers.

 

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1-1/2 Gpm...your splitting hairs. You couldn't tell the difference driving one. Case used many manufacturers, with slight variations in displacement. I think the most popular pump in 400 series was a Parker D27 which is .626 cu-in. But then the volumetric efficiency of 80% to 90%; whatever. Use tractordata for ground speed and tire size and figure out motor size; or just use the pump that is in tractor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Your right about possibly splitting hairs. I'm not using the tractors pump or tire size. Going with a higher volume pump to run rubber tracks. Will need to run the hydraulic motors faster to obtain a faster ground speed. The closer I get to actual numbers so I can use the original gearbox and hydraulic motor, the closer I can design without making an expensive error. If I can't get the info on the motor, I was going to reverse engineer the motor info using actual pump info. I also don't want to blow the seals on the motor by putting to much pressure to it. I'm an engineer by trade so I design things first before purchasing parts. I'm starting with and have 2 446 gearboxes and motors.
 

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1973 Case 444, 1974 Case 644, 1976 Case 446, 1977 Case 646
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Your right about possibly splitting hairs. I'm not using the tractors pump or tire size. Going with a higher volume pump to run rubber tracks. Will need to run the hydraulic motors faster to obtain a faster ground speed. The closer I get to actual numbers so I can use the original gearbox and hydraulic motor, the closer I can design without making an expensive error. If I can't get the info on the motor, I was going to reverse engineer the motor info using actual pump info. I also don't want to blow the seals on the motor by putting to much pressure to it. I'm an engineer by trade so I design things first before purchasing parts. I'm starting with and have 2 446 gearboxes and motors.
Sounds like a very interesting project twiddlebug. I'll be definitely following your build!

Keep the Peace
Harry
 

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Your right about possibly splitting hairs. I'm not using the tractors pump or tire size. Going with a higher volume pump to run rubber tracks. Will need to run the hydraulic motors faster to obtain a faster ground speed. The closer I get to actual numbers so I can use the original gearbox and hydraulic motor, the closer I can design without making an expensive error. If I can't get the info on the motor, I was going to reverse engineer the motor info using actual pump info. I also don't want to blow the seals on the motor by putting to much pressure to it. I'm an engineer by trade so I design things first before purchasing parts. I'm starting with and have 2 446 gearboxes and motors.
I'm an Engineer too, an old one. Empirical data is paramount. Tractordata has already given you the data you need, the rest is just algebra. Having said that, I think MAB24XX means 24 cu-in per rev. Since you have the transaxles, count the teeth, work out the speed and confirm.

So your using 4 tracks?
 

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I'm an Engineer too, an old one. Empirical data is paramount. Tractordata has already given you the data you need, the rest is just algebra. Having said that, I think MAB24XX means 24 cu-in per rev. Since you have the transaxles, count the teeth, work out the speed and confirm.

So your using 4 tracks?
If this is the... Case... I smell a mini Quadtrac coming and it makes me very excited... Definitely want to see pics through the build process.
 

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What work do you want your articulated track machine to do? Mowing is out, clumsy as hell for tilling, blowing snow and pushing dirt would be great though, or running stationary machines like a splitter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for your responses. I found out from Baum Hydraulics (who found and old motor spec book) that the motor is rated continuous at 2000 psi, 224 rpm, 20 gpm. It requires 17.1 cu/revolution. The tractor will sit on 4 rubber flat treads that when the cogged drive wheel turns 1 revolution, the track will move 63.75". I now will remove the cover from the gear box to determine what 1 revolution of the hydraulic motor produces at output shaft for the high and low gearings. From this info I can calculate the pump GPM requirements to accomplish the ground speed I may want in accordance with the motor specs.
 

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2000PSI continuous is more of an industrial situation. On mobile it's okay to use the peak pressure. Usually you get wheel (track) spin before achieving that much torque (or at least it should be sized that way). You should calculate tractive force and gradeability.

What diameter is the cog wheel?

Are they ATV tracks or are you making tracks? Is it for snow?
 
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