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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Lately I've been seeing a lot of questions about changing tires, so I thought I'd take some pictures while I was changing mine, and give a little information about how to do this yourself.

I first want to say that having the right tools really makes a big difference. Many years ago I bought the tire changer from Harbor Freight for changing my own motorcycle tires. The changer itself sells for around $60 and works pretty well.


Once you have removed the tire, you need to remove the valve core to allow all of the air to escape the tire. Then you place it on the floor and use the bead breaker. Flip it over and break the other side.


Once both beads are loose, I mount it on the tire changer. At this point, I spray a little water with some dish soap around the bead for lubrication. You can then use tire spoons to remove the tire from the wheel, but remember what I said about having the right tools? I have this thing called a WonderBar from nomartirechanger.com which makes life much easier. You just inset the round nylon end of the bar in the tire, and using the center clamp as a guide, push the bar against it and remove the tire.


Then in the same manner, remove the bottom bead and the tire is free from the rim.


With the tire removed, this is when you clean up the inside of the rim, and change the valve stem, so that the new tire will seal well. I was very fortunate that the inside of my rims were in very good shape and didn't require much cleaning.

Next, I figured out the direction orientation of the new tire, and sprayed the bottom bead with some water/soap mixture, and placed it on the rim. You can usually get this bead on the rim just by pushing it, or you may need to use the tire spoons, but it really shouldn't take much to get this first bead on.




The top bead is the one that can be a little tricky. Again, I wet down the bead with my mixture, and reach for my wonderbar, but tire spoons will work also. One of the tricks at this point is to make sure you push the tire down to the center of the rim as you work to give you more room. It will definitely make it easier to finish getting the rest of the bead on.


At this point, before I install the valve core, I use the air chuck to inflate the tire to seat the bead. I got lucky and did not have any issues seating the beads to the rim, but sometimes no matter how much air you add, it just won't seal. This is when I take a nylon ratchet strap and wrap around the center of the tire, and apply just enough tension to force the beads out to the rim. Next, insert the valve core and only add enough air to make sure it doesn't leak, then remove the strap. Once the strap has been removed, finish adding air to the tire to the desired pressure.


Remount tire and rim to the tractor, then remove next tire and repeat.


and repeat......


There are several ways to mount tires, however this is the way I do it. It really is not that difficult if you don't mind getting a little dirty. I did all four tires tonight in about an hour and a half or so, and really wasn't working too hard.
 

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Thanks AIC

Now I got to buy more tools. LOL

When I mount mine I use a "Product" which I got from the tire shop it's a RIM Sealer and is recommended for Rims that are less than perfect and for Re-Mounting a tire. It seals the Bead and since using it I have never had a leaking tire.

I don't have a name for it but I'm sure someone will chime in. LOL

Stewart
 

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Those are great "tools",I have a tire changer somewhat like that and I would be lost without it.
I also have an air operated Coats 40-40A tire changer that I use to change car and truck tires.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Stewart said:
Thanks AIC

Now I got to buy more tools. LOL

When I mount mine I use a "Product" which I got from the tire shop it's a RIM Sealer and is recommended for Rims that are less than perfect and for Re-Mounting a tire. It seals the Bead and since using it I have never had a leaking tire.

I don't have a name for it but I'm sure someone will chime in. LOL

Stewart
Thanks. Do you mean this stuff?


I've used rubber cement on my ATV tires. I'm pretty sure it's the same thing. If not, it's a good substitute. Just take a little bit on your finger or brush and apply it to the bead of the rim. It helps to seal the tire to the rim.
 

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I use CAMEL brand bead sealer myself.I also use RUGLYDE tire mounting lubricant when installing tires,it helps them go on a lot easier.
 

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happy new year to all.
there is a min-tire changer ate harbor freight # 34552 $45.99
have one and it works great on small wheels
Gil. :thumbsup:
 

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Recently I was trying to repair a slow leak from a cheap imperfect tire and after cleaning up,and repainting the rim, trying again and checking with soapy water and continuing to fail even after countless attempts to dress the sealing surface of the tire as well, I smeared the sealing surface of the tire with RTV silicone and it's holding tight now. The silicone just had to fill the gaps from the slight imperfections. I'm not too concerned with extra effort required for removal next time as I have a little 10 ton C press that handles most stubborn jobs. That was the last ditch effort before picking up a tube.
Chris
 

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That one "GOES AHEAD BACK and BACKS AHEAD FRONT" :sidelaugh: :sidelaugh: :sidelaugh:
What an awesome tractor!

Regards,
Nolan :222: :446:
 

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Hi Scott,
Your shop is much too clean so the next time I go west on I-80 I'll bring some of my shop sweepings and toss them out as I pass thru S C, PA!!!!!! :sidelaugh: :sidelaugh: :sidelaugh:
Mad Mackie in CT :mrgreen: :geek: :crazy: :mowlawn:
 

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I'm jealous of people with clean shops. :gums: If I start a project I keep working on it until I'm too pooped out to clean up after myself. :lol: :lol:


Changing tires has always been one of those jobs I've paid someone else to do. I might have to pick up one of those changers if it's half as easy as it looks. (It probably isn't) :shock:
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Bob MacGregor said:
Hi Scott,
Your shop is much too clean so the next time I go west on I-80 I'll bring some of my shop sweepings and toss them out as I pass thru S C, PA!!!!!! :sidelaugh: :sidelaugh: :sidelaugh:
Mad Mackie in CT :mrgreen: :geek: :crazy: :mowlawn:
It's not always that clean. You should have seen it when I was building my last project:
Bonfatto's Smoker Build

 

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Wow, that is serious smoker. As someone that smoked pork ribs for the first time last summer ( in a charcoal grill with indirect heat) I am impressed.

JB
 

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I bought a pair of front wheels on eBay several years ago that had bead sealant used on them. I had to cut the tires off with a sheetrock knife as close as I could and with a die grinder and bit cut the wires in the beads. I had tried the bead braker at my former employer and I couldn't budge the beads at all. I even tried to brake them on my 20 ton press!!!
When I get my shop/garage all cleaned up, which has only been three times and I've been here in this house for 43 years, it only takes me minutes to mess it up!!!! All the years of clean military and civilian aircraft maintnance habits go out the door as soon as I get home and into a project!!! So having been a government employee I have aquired the ability of blaming the mess on someone else at least in my mind anyway!!!!! :sidelaugh: :sidelaugh: :sidelaugh: But now that all my kids have long since been out of the house I've had to get creative with my blames!!!! :sidelaugh: :sidelaugh: :sidelaugh:
Older son is worse than me as he has two 85 Cameros in unassembled condition in his garage and nothing has been done to them since kids arrived and doing an addition to his house!!!
Mad Mackie in CT :mrgreen: :geek: :crazy: :mowlawn:
 

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The shop thing is hereditary. I got it from my dad, who got it from his.. :thumbsup:

Also, got a pack-rat gene.... you know what I mean... look at something and see a use for it down the road, so you grab it and stash it. :mrgreen:

As for the tires, I just take them in to work on Sunday's. I work at a motorcycle shop, so I use the machines after service closes.
 

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Again, Nice looking smoker!!!! Scott does nice work, no doubt about it. I've seen and operated his ArticIngerCase before it was dieselized. It was great to have him bring it to the Casenutz Gathering that I held here in CT in 2010.
Mad Mackie in CT
 
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