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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, My name is Dave in Indiana, I have a Colt Rancher 12. It has a Kohler engine.
It is orange & white. I guess it is a 1965. I was told that the rancher was purple & white.
I scraped through the paint on the frame. No purple. I was also told that the Rancher had a
Tecumseh engine. Mine has a Kohler. It looks to be original. Want to repaint it this summer.
Need to know what color. I have had this tractor for a long time. Done some digging on the internet, and here I am. Didn't realize it was a great tractor.
Dave
 

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Welcome to the forum Indiana Dave.

Photos of what you have would be a big help but let's see what we can do for you.

If you do have a Rancher 12, then it will have a K-301 Kohler K engine in it. It will also have 16" rear rims on it. Do you have the serial number?

The first two photos below depict a 1966 Colt 2510 with the Tec 10 hp engine in it. This tractor replace the Colt Super H from 1965.

This is a very correct restoration that was carried out by a fellow collector and friend of mine.





The next two photos are of my friends 1965 Colt Rancher 10 which is identical to the Rancher 12 in all respects but the engine, which is a 10 hp Kohler K instead of the 12 hp model. Once again, this tractor is a correct restoration.





I'm not going to tell you that I am 100 percent positive that your tractor was repainted because I've seen far too much weird stuff come out of the Winneconne plant to make that statement any more. However, I will say that I'm 95% sure that you have a repaint.

Total dismantling of the tractor should reveal some trace of the original paint unless the tractor was stripped to bare metal everywhere. Is your tractor together or apart? How long have you owned it? What have you been using it for?

What do intend to do with it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The rancher 12 I have had 10 to 15 yrs. I got it from a guy I worked with. The steering
Column was broke where the u bolt clamps it. I made an insert and fixed that. I got a mower deck & snow blade with it. It is in the unheated part of my pole barn. Have some pix.
need to try and upload them. I have taken some stuff off, like the seat, finders, hood, ect.
Needs a rebuild. It is all there.
Dave
 

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Dave...
Are you intending to do a proper restoration of this tractor?

By that, I mean...take it totally apart to the bare frame. Strip all the parts clean of dirt, grease, paint and rust down to bare metal and then carefully prime and paint them. As you go, you repair damage and replace worn out parts.

Does you tractor still have the Rancher 12 decals on it in the same spots as the Rancher 10 shown in the photos above?
 

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Go to Photobucket (pb)

Select one photo by placing your cursor on it

Slide your cursor down that photo and a drop down box will appear.

Continue sliding your cursor until you reach the bottom line in that box and then click on it. You will see it blink.

Come back here, begin a new post in this thread.

Use your right button to paste that link to the photo into your post. Hit RETURN 3 times to create a space for the next photo.

Go back to PB, select another photo and repeat the moves with your cursor. Come back here and paste the link into your post.

Keep doing that until you have all the photos you wish to show us, in your post. Complete all of your text and then hit the PREVIEW button at the bottom. You will now see an advance version of what your post will look like. All the photos should appear. If they do not, then you made a mistake. You can scroll back down to your original post and make any changes you wish to.

If you are still having problems, you can send me a PM by clicking on my name and selecting the PM feature on the left side.
 

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Hi, Dave,
Both Jensales and Agricon manuals list a service manual for the Case 180, which is the tan and orange equivalent of your Colt. The closest thing they have in an operator's manual is for the Case 130 which is a low-profile (12" rear wheels) tractor of almost the same design. Both companies list these manuals under "Case/David Brown" on their websites. Hope this helps,
John
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Well I became a tool & die maker in 1969. I was an auto mechanic before that. I have a ham radio license since 1960. I enjoy making things, fixing things. I get more enjoyment in the challenge, than selling or scrapping it. I am retired and I don't need to do anything till warm weather. The tractor has been in a pole barn ever since I got it. It was inside a pole barn when I picked it up. It's to good to scrap. I have not ran or checked out the motor, or anything else. I hope this makes sense to you. I am not trying to be smart, just how I feel.
 

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Indiana Colt said:
Well I became a tool & die maker in 1969. I was an auto mechanic before that. I have a ham radio license since 1960. I enjoy making things, fixing things. I get more enjoyment in the challenge, than selling or scrapping it. I am retired and I don't need to do anything till warm weather. The tractor has been in a pole barn ever since I got it. It was inside a pole barn when I picked it up. It's to good to scrap. I have not ran or checked out the motor, or anything else. I hope this makes sense to you. I am not trying to be smart, just how I feel.
Everything you said above makes perfect sense to me.

The question is...will my response below, make perfect sense to you?

To be a top notch tool & die maker, mechanic or ham radio operator, one needs to be passionate and dedicated to the craft. If you agree with that statement, then you won't be offended by the following.

The Rancher 12 was the top model for Colt in 1965, so it was also the most expensive. On that issue, you are quite fortunate. It's similar to finding an old Cadillac to add to your GM collection that already has a Chev, Pontiac, Buick and Olds. As a former tool & die maker, you know that there is no such thing as half-ass measures. That's how I feel about restoration in general and in particular about restoration to any Colt or Case tractor built prior to 1977.

The Case tractors of this era are all painted Desert Sunset and one of the two reds (Power Red or Flambeau Red). You came here to learn more about the tractor you have and we are pleased to help you in any way we can. Your tractor was the brainchild of two brothers by the name of Johnson that developed the hydraulic drive tractor in concert with another local company and that led to patents being taken out.

That purportedly took place in or about 1962 and Colt Manufacturing was begun. The merits of the product were noticed by J.I. Case and in late 1964, Colt was purchased by the Case parent company, Tenneco. Colts were made in 1965 and 1966 under Case ownership along with Case garden tractor models but the success of both lines overwhelmed the production capabilities of the Winneconne plant.

The story is...Case had to make a business decision as to which line of tractors was the long-term plan. Obviously, the Case brand would triumph and it did. While Colts are not rare in the true sense of the word, those of us who are involved with Case tractors recognize and often revere the tractor that made what we enjoy today, possible. The long and the short of it comes down to this.

If a restoration is worth doing, then it's worth doing right. That old tractor has likely worked its butt off for more than one owner in the past. It deserves to be paid back for all that service. It deserves to be lovingly dismantled, painstakingly cleaned of all oil, grease, dirt, rust and paint until bare metal is reached. It is entitled to have worn out parts replaced, problem parts rebuilt, other problems repaired and then have all those parts painted carefully with the correct colors for that year.

You've seen the photos of what your tractor COULD look like once the above principles have been applied. If you do all of that, you will have something that will give you pride to show to others.

Now comes the warning. :sidelaugh:

More often than not, gentlemen such as yourself naively begin this process thinking that they will restore this one tractor and that will be the end of it. Sounds reasonable. Then someone who has seen your tractor will tell you that they are sure they spotted one like yours sitting next to a barn on Sideroad 10.

You will shrug and say..."that's nice" and leave it at that. However, over the next few days, that information will eat away at your brain. You will tell your dear wife that you need to go to the store to get something and then your vehicle will uncontrollably find itself driving along Sideroad 10, even though that's not the "as the Crow flies" route to the store.

Yes, you will spot that forlorn tractor laying exactly as described and exposed to the elements. A feeling of deep sadness will come over you along with a desire to give this old machine a pat on its rusty hood. Your vehicle door will open all by itself and your boots will pull you to the side of this tractor. That's when you discover it's a Super H Colt.

Your trespass did not go unnoticed and the farmhouse door will swing open. The lady will ask what you are doing and now you have to fumble for words to explain how you got to where you are standing. You will smile and utter something that will put her at ease and then ask her if her husband would be willing to part with this rusting hulk of metal. She will screw up her face because she now thinks that you fell on your head at the time of birth and is afraid of what you might do next.

She tells you to call her husband Jeb after 6 pm and gives you the number before scuttling back inside the house and locking the door behind her. You make that call later that night and the next day, you and a buddy arrive there to haul that Colt onto his trailer. Home it goes and the process begins once more. That's how it starts and as you find out more and more about the Colts, more and more of them arrive in that shed of yours. Sooner than later, that shed will get cleaned out, fixed up and then an addition will take place.

What I'm warning you about is a disease that cannot be found in any medical journal or publication that your MD has available. It is wise to involve your wife and contaminate her as well. Some women understand this disease because all they need to do is look at how many dresses, shoes, handbags, scarves, lipsticks and hats they own. Others are in denial by saying those items are not comparable. To a degree, they are right. All of those items are disposable and rapidly depreciate in value.

Your collection likely will not depreciate nor will it end up in the garbage or the GoodWill box down at the local plaza.

It's my belief that this site and the membership can provide you with all the help you need to carry out a proper and correct restoration no matter what the issue might be.....except for the cash and sweat equity. Those two things are where you come in.

So..... ponder my words. Hopefully, you will see the merit in my suggestions.

Tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Tom, I think you could sell air conditioners to Eskimos. You have described my life. Everything I have was a deal. After I saw a photo of a frame setting on saw horses all clean and painted only makes me want to do it right. This may take some time. So many projects, so little time. Anyway looking at the photos section, there is vary few case 180, and no Colt Rancher 12's. I will get into it more this summer. The dash
has no ignition switch. Just a toggle switch. to the coil. The frame is orange. Everything that I have taken off so far doesn't show any purple. There is no tag on the dash. Is there any way to tell if it for sure is a Rancher.
More ramblings from Dave
 

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Dave,
In 1965, Colt released the Deluxe, Super, Super H, Rancher 10 and Rancher 12.

All 5 had Kohler K engines in them and they were painted white. The Deluxe and the Super came with 12 inch rear rims, the Super H came with 15" rear rims and both Ranchers had 16" rear rims. The Rancher 12 is the only one of the bunch that had the K-301 12 hp engine. You have the correct size of rear rubber. There should be a tag on that engine and it will tell you which engine you have.

The key to a long-term resto comes down to two simple procedures. The first one is to make a log of the order of dismantling the tractor so that you put it back together in the same order but in reverse. That keeps you from installing five parts and then realizing you have to remove those five because you forgot to install another part before them.

The other procedure is to take lots of clear, well-lit digital photos to show you how the tractor was put together before you took it apart. You may never even look at those photos but if you get confused about something, those photos become gold.

Just remove all the major parts as a unit. Put nuts, bolts and washer back into those parts as you set the aside. Focus on just making the frame ready. Then deal with the steering box, followed by all the small stuff that goes on the dash and behind the dash. Then we'll talk you through the trans-axle followed by the front axle until you have the tractor sitting on four jack stands. Then it's time to restore all the tin and the rims. With the fenders in place, the tire/rims can go back on along with the toolbox and seat. The hood, grille and side panels can wait until the engine is dealt with.

The hydraulics are pretty simple and straight forward. The engine can be bolted to a bench and test run after removal of the head reveals that there are no major rust issues. The exhaust and carb holes can be sealed up to allow sandblasting of all the cast iron as well as the tin. Heat resistant white paint is available.

Just some thoughts......

Tom
 

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Tom,that would make a good pilot for a TV series. :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
Anyway,it was well said,and there is a LOT of truth in it.

Jeb........ :sidelaugh: :sidelaugh: :sidelaugh:



Maynard :canada:
 

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Tom, Everything that you said about the disease is true with one slight omission. Even though you think that you will never do it, you will find yourself on the damn computer at all hours reading tractor forums. Gregg (nutcase446)
 
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