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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After seeing pictures of my 4020 (Linamar LX790), Gordy pointed out to me that it was missing the oil filter gasket, and that without that gasket the cylinder head temp of that side will get too high. A little reading showed me the danger of damaging the valve seats on that side if the CHT gets too high.

Meanwhile I'm adding a loader to this tractor and as part of that I'm bolting a crossmember to the bottom of the two main (previously reinforced) frame rails. That means that the black plastic splash shield that goes under the frame rails has to be modified or potentially eliminated.

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Analyzing the airflow implications of the splash shield made me think that I'd like to try to block off the tower's downward facing opening in order to decrease the amount of grass and debris drawn up from the underside of the tractor and increase the airflow across the oil cooler. I'd rather the flywheel impeller draw in pure clean air from the two grilles on the sides of the tower, and increase the performance of the oil cooler.

However, if I do draw more air through the oil cooler, the air that flows over the oil cooler will be at least a little bit pre-heated before it ever gets pulled through the flywheel to flow over the engine. So will I then risk overheating the engine and cylinder heads?

There's one sure way to find out. I've bought one of these: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01G6SJW8U which I'll install in conjunction with any changes to the splash shield and airflow. That'll give me peace of mind that my CHT's are staying in a safe range at all times.

If anyone else is concerned/curious about your engine's operating temperature, CHT is an effective, inexpensive way to monitor it. This particular gauge is for a two cylinder enginr and comes with 2 probe wires each having a ring terminal the size of a sparkplug washer. You pull the plug, put the probe ring terminal over the plug threads and reassemble. The guage will now read the temperature right at the base of the spark plug.

CHT is the same approach used in air-cooled aviation engines to allow the pilot to monitor engine temp. On those engines, the cylinder heads have a dedicated location to bolt down the sensor probe, so you don't have to use a sparkplug ring, but it's the same result.

I'll update this post later with details on how it goes.
 

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Above what temperature of the head are you classifying it as "worrisome" or overheating?

Regarding the air that runs over the oil cooler, on all earlier Case tractors the air that cools the engine comes through the oil cooler.

That temperature gauge is a neat device.
 

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I wouldn't worry. A loader tractor seldom, if ever works the engine very hard. All loader work is done at part throttle except maybe if you are leveling or pushing piles a hundred yards or so. Even tilling is using only about 10 to 12 hp max of the engine power. Instead of thermocouples on the plugs, a better investment would be a hydraulic temp gauge if you are worried about airflow through the cooler. Might come in handy when you are loading trucks in a pit all day. lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Above what temperature of the head are you classifying it as "worrisome" or overheating?

Regarding the air that runs over the oil cooler, on all earlier Case tractors the air that cools the engine comes through the oil cooler.

That temperature gauge is a neat device.
From general reading on the internet, anything below about 400 is of no concern.
 

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20-30 years ago, when I was a air cooled VW geek, similar sensors were available (not digital I guess). They went under head bolt. I have considered for my GT’s, but never pursued. I have bought a temp gauge for oil, but not connected yet, lol.
 
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