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What do we know about Colt's level of automation in the '60's? I ask, because I'm tearing into my 120 to get it mechanically restored before I make it all pretty. Now, my 155 and even my 130 seem to be very professionally assembled. I'm presuming on an assembly line.

However, my 120 shows evidence of some serious hand work. The transmission was clearly cut into a 150 frame with a grinder, and some sloppy grinder work at that. This seems to be original work, and not any PO mods, as there is factory paint over all of it, and it's clearly necessary for parts to fit.

Were the 120's just 150's pulled off the line early and completed by hand? Would the T-90's be the same thing then? Do we know enough about that era to even make an educated guess here?

I would love as complete a history lesson as anyone is able to provide.

Chris
 

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Colt was a fledgeling company that began in a small building in Milwaukee before being enticed to move into the larger premises in Winneconne. However, they no sooner got their feet under the boardroom table in that little town before the big guns from Racine arrived at their new front door wanting to buy the company. Yes.... there was an assembly line set up to make the 1964 Colt models and I'm sure that Bill Schlapman made some rapid changes to how things were done when Case installed him in that plant in late 1964 when the ink dried on the bill of sale. We also know that a major revamping of the plant took place a couple of years later to improve efficiencies by creating a second assembly line and installing dyno's to test every tractor before it rolled out the door.

The 120 and Colt 2110 gear drive models were the first such units made by Colt and Case and only for that one year. The parts manuals show a different part number for the gear drive frames and the hydraulic drive frames but realistically speaking, once you got forward of the trans-axle there wasn't any significant difference between the 120 and the 150 or the 2110 and the 2310. Therefore, on the earliest production models, it would surprise me to see what you have witnessed. There were a lot of strange happenings inside that plant in the years preceding 1969 that have baffled many of the collectors. The T-90's are a completely different animal that apparently used up several parts from the discontinued Colt line as well as bits from the Case models.

Educated guess???? Hmmmm. Seems to me that Jim Daenzer has been working pretty hard for quite a few years to gather up enough information to create just that. I don't think he's finished yet and I don't think that he knows just when he might be finished. :sidelaugh: Every new submission to Jim's Registry brings another tiny piece of the puzzle but the puzzle is huge.
 
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