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Albeit minor I stumbled upon a design flaw yesterday. I had the front end partially apart and I did the poor man's power steering mod (works like a champ by the way). Well after i put everything back together I grabbed the grease gun and went to relube the spindles. Wouldn't ya know after doing the first one I ended up with a zerk stuck in my grease gun. Who would have thought that Case would have used pressed in grease fittings. I think this is the first application where I have actually seen them used. Needless to say I had to make a run to RK to get some 1/4-28 zerks to replace the old ones.

All things considered, I have had this tractor for a little more than 9 months and this is my only complaint. Not to bad considering how particular I can be about things.
 

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I had something simular on my Ingersoll, when I removed the belly pan to install the selector valve there was a zerk fitting sitting in the belly pan. It did not look like a press fitting, it looked like it was stripped out from being over tightened.
 

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At least with that you can weld a 1/4-28NF nut over the hole and forget about it, done that many times on the farm. Hydriv, I have a scrap yard out back so bring em over :sidelaugh:
 

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Never implied it was a big deal, it was an easy enough fix and if that is the worst thing that happens I sure can live with it. Actually we should be great full they put zerk fittings in, most manufacturers todays whether it be automobiles trucks etc. do not even use zerk fittings. I did have another problem, the heavy hydraulic line under the tractor was leaking at one of the crimps. The hydraulics shop would not re-crimp the hose, I had to buy another one and discard a perfectly good hose and fittings that I believe could have been repaired.
 

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markgru02919 said:
Never implied it was a big deal, it was an easy enough fix and if that is the worst thing that happens I sure can live with it. Actually we should be great full they put zerk fittings in, most manufacturers todays whether it be automobiles trucks etc. do not even use zerk fittings. I did have another problem, the heavy hydraulic line under the tractor was leaking at one of the crimps. The hydraulics shop would not re-crimp the hose, I had to buy another one and discard a perfectly good hose and fittings that I believe could have been repaired.
Mark,
I thought that I wrote my response in a way that you would have realized I was just kidding.

Case has been using press-in zerks for ages. Only occasionally do I read a post where someone has had one come out. In other words, they work 99 percent of the time. When a hydraulics shop says no to your request, then that's the time to go to another shop and see if they say no but only after asking the first shop the reason why behind the no. Because I did not have an answer to this question, I called my hydraulics guy at Princess Auto and this is what he said. Hoses vary in outer diameter from manufacturer to manufacturer and the fittings they carry will not always work on hoses that customers bring in for repair. Their machine is designed to crimp their own line of fittings plus two other brands. if I brought them a hose that they had made, then they would re-crimp it at no charge but they cannot guarantee that the re-crimping would solve the problem.

Head office for PA has laid down the law on this issue for liability reasons. The crimping machines come with an instruction book that tells the operator how to set up for each crimp, depending upon the fitting selected and the hose used. This way, the correct amount of pressure is exerted on the crimp-barrel to prevent hose blow-off. The guy who said no was probably right in doing so. However, my guy at PA says that they stock a bunch of fittings that don't need a crimping tool. The old fitting can be removed carefully by splitting the crimp-barrel in several spots and then prying it away from the hose. Inspection of the hose end would then determine if the other fitting style would work or not.

The questions then become -

Is the correct fitting available in the other style?

Would you have to use more than one fitting to solve the problem?

If so, would the extra fittings cause a clearance problem or an overall hose length issue?

And finally, how much do the extra fittings add up to compared to the cost of a new hose with crimped fittings?

I totally understand your unhappiness at tossing out a hose that appeared to be perfect except for a bad crimping job but those who are in the hydraulics business take safety to be an important factor when making such decisions.
 

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Hydriv said:
markgru02919 said:
Never implied it was a big deal, it was an easy enough fix and if that is the worst thing that happens I sure can live with it. Actually we should be great full they put zerk fittings in, most manufacturers todays whether it be automobiles trucks etc. do not even use zerk fittings. I did have another problem, the heavy hydraulic line under the tractor was leaking at one of the crimps. The hydraulics shop would not re-crimp the hose, I had to buy another one and discard a perfectly good hose and fittings that I believe could have been repaired.
Mark,
I thought that I wrote my response in a way that you would have realized I was just kidding.

Case has been using press-in zerks for ages. Only occasionally do I read a post where someone has had one come out. In other words, they work 99 percent of the time. When a hydraulics shop says no to your request, then that's the time to go to another shop and see if they say no but only after asking the first shop the reason why behind the no. Because I did not have an answer to this question, I called my hydraulics guy at Princess Auto and this is what he said. Hoses vary in outer diameter from manufacturer to manufacturer and the fittings they carry will not always work on hoses that customers bring in for repair. Their machine is designed to crimp their own line of fittings plus two other brands. if I brought them a hose that they had made, then they would re-crimp it at no charge but they cannot guarantee that the re-crimping would solve the problem.

Head office for PA has laid down the law on this issue for liability reasons. The crimping machines come with an instruction book that tells the operator how to set up for each crimp, depending upon the fitting selected and the hose used. This way, the correct amount of pressure is exerted on the crimp-barrel to prevent hose blow-off. The guy who said no was probably right in doing so. However, my guy at PA says that they stock a bunch of fittings that don't need a crimping tool. The old fitting can be removed carefully by splitting the crimp-barrel in several spots and then prying it away from the hose. Inspection of the hose end would then determine if the other fitting style would work or not.

The questions then become -

Is the correct fitting available in the other style?

Would you have to use more than one fitting to solve the problem?

If so, would the extra fittings cause a clearance problem or an overall hose length issue?

And finally, how much do the extra fittings add up to compared to the cost of a new hose with crimped fittings?

I totally understand your unhappiness at tossing out a hose that appeared to be perfect except for a bad crimping job but those who are in the hydraulics business take safety to be an important factor when making such decisions.
I knew you were kidding and again do not worry about it. The Hydraulics shop I went to just said he has had bad results and all I wanted him to do was try. What had happened to the hose was it was leaking between the rubber hose and the crimp barrel, I asked him to just "squash" the crimp a little bit tighter and I would have taken my chances on whether it still leaked or not. I just hated laying out money for a new hose without attempting to fix an almost perfectly good hose first. Plus when I seen little spots of fluid on the floor of my shed I should have called the dealer while it was under warrantee (Lazy, stupidity on my part) It wasn't a big deal to fix the hose was 45, but then again if the recrimping did not work I would have been buying more oil so writing this and thinking about it somemore it was probally the right path to follow especially with the worst part being getting rid of the pit oil!!!!
 

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I had a Gates hydraulic hose making set up in my shop. I made hoses from 1/4" to 1 1/4" 4 wire hose. If I made a hose assembly with Gates hose, the correct Gates fitting and crimped properly with the Gates machine, they assumed the liability. With any other circumstances, I was on my own. Gates uses different fixed dies for every size hose so you couldn't just crimp a little more even if you wanted to. I could repair a Gates hose with a new fitting. There were always salesman coming around selling aftermarket hose that supposedly met Gates spec but I never figured that it was worth the risk. I'm fairly sure that all hose assembly companies have the same liability conditions. There are just too many things that can go wrong with hydraulics. I did have a few people leave my shop mad...
 

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The fitting on the grease gun is adjustable, most folks are not aware of this. The outside of the fitting is threaded on and can be loosened to remove it from a grease fitting if it doesn't want to release easily. If this part is too tight, take two sets of pliers and loosen it. This piece fits over the adjustable jaws inside it that grip a grease fitting so grease can be pumped into it and not blow off from the pressure from the grease gun.
However not being a fan of pressed in grease fittings I drill and tap for a threaded grease fitting when I have the spindles out for the poormans power steering mod.
When I lube the spindles on my ZTR, I back off grease gun fitting, push it onto the grease fitting, tighten it, pump the grease gun, and back off the gun fitting and pull it off the grease fitting. A broken spindle grease fitting would take hours to replace on my ZTR!!!!
Mad Mackie in Taxonnecticut :mrgreen: :lol: :geek: :mowlawn:
 
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