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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'll admit, I have not had any hands on experience with any 226's until this week. My buddy (who also has the dreaded addiction) picked up a 226 black frame last Thursday night, and today, We drove down to Union Grove, WI and dragged another one home.

The black frame made sense to me. The "chart" shows they started in '84, but we have plenty examples of '83's. Wide hood, rear oil tank......

The one today has me miffed. An all power red tractor, narrow hood with the square cut-outs exactly like the 1975 446 we have sitting here, FRONT oil tank !..... ????

To my knowledge, there simply were NO front oil tank models painted power red. 1976 was the first year for a rear oil tank, and it was a steel flat tank. That would put this tractor prior to 1976 with the front tank, and frankly, the hood cut-outs certainly match that of the engine tin that came out inside the square hood notches for side oval mufflers just like our 1975 446. The notches (whats left of them) look factory.

I did not get a good look at the serial number, but I could swear it started with a 140.... which would make it up there way past the 1980 mark, BUT, the steering tower is clearly setup for a metal battery tray !

I am either really confused, or this tractor has some major, MAJOR hanky panky going on with it. So what is the earliest known year for the 226 ?
 

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you got me interested too Grummy, everything I have seen so far supports the 226 as being a later version witht the wide hood and all. I personally prefer the narrow hooded units and that is primarily why I haven't given too much thought to a 226, if this thing is clean enough look stock and fool your veteran eye, I would love to see some pics of it myself, not that your buddy would sell it or anything, but i would love to drool over some pics just the same.

Hope the group can help you figure out the mystery. :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
 

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My parts catalog # 8-2753 shows a red frame 226 with a starting PIN of 14048500. According to the chart, this puts it into 1983 possibly. The very last 224s had a PIN that started with 140-----.
The B43s on early 226s had a spec # 3622A, later models past PIN 14071775 had spec # 4183C.
Mad Mackie in CT :mrgreen: :mowlawn:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Something else I just remembered. It has the old style brake pedal, not the "U" loop of 1/2" rod. I'll swing in there on my way home and get the current serial number and a few photos.

By all visual clues, its a 1975 style 446 hood (with the 1978 style tabs in the rear), 1975ish frame and brake pedal. 1978 style foot rests, but I think it had 1979 style fenders, front oil tank, all in Power red and a newer serial number.

Franken-Case indeed ! I'll get more facts tonight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well, the serial number tag puts it into the 1985 year. The rivets do not really look like they have been replaced, but there is no other explanation than someone did swap tags on it.

The term "Franken-Case" couldnt even describe some of whats been done here. The frame is an early 446. It does have the dropped frame for the engine. There is no rear access panel in the tower, and there is a plugged hole in the vertical flat under the key. I forget what that hole was used for.

I'm guessing that the frame was early enough that it did not have the fast snap pins, so someone spliced the very front of a 200 series frame onto the old frame so they could have the newer hitch pin setup. Since the 446 had the 6 bolt hubs, someone then must have dropped the 5 bolt axle under the 400 series frame. Interestingly, they also mounted a factory add-on holding valve, which, must have been along for the ride from the 1985 donor tractor.

They installed the 1985 rear fenders around the original metal tank, and the fenders have the reflectors on them like I assume the 1985's did. Looking thru with a flashlight, it looks like the whole steel tank is painted power red too, which can only mean someone actually spent a lot of time on this thing.

As mentioned earlier, the hood has to be from a 1975ish 446 with the simple square cut-outs in the lower edge of the sides. There is a 1975 446 here, and the engine tin deflects heat from the pipes thru these cutouts. But the hood does not really look like someone repainted it. There ares a few scrubbed up areas underneath that show tan paint, but really, the paint does not look repainted. The top side also looks like original paint. It too has scrubs and chips, but no tan paint showing anywhere. The decals are intact and look to be original, with no masking marks from a repaint around them.

The front seat support tin also has chips with tan showing thru, but the rear one does not show tan paint anywhere on the chips.

In the end, the only conclusion possible is that someone did a mega mix and match. Still, the comparative to factory quality of the hood paint and decals can only mean someone really did do a factory level repaint and put brand new factory decals on it after the paint.

And I was hoping that we found the "missing link" prototype 226 from 1975 !
 

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I was always under the impression it was 1983 they came out with the 226.
I know what tractor you bought. I was contemplating on buying it, but I really don't need another project so I decided against it.
Good deal if you ask me. Sure is a crazy story. :think: :wtf: :grin:
 

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Just a note on model years....the infamous s/n chart is based on calender year (beginning Jan. 1) and does not indicate the model year of the tractor.

To help understand the process, at the Winneconne factory, the month of July was "plant shutdown". That's when the assembly line employees were off for vacation and during that time the line was updated for the manufacture of the following model year's changes. Production renewed August 1st, and in this case (8/1/83) the '84 model run began. Around this time and into September the regional dealer sales meetings took place where we were expected to place our stocking orders to the next year so that the factory had an idea of what to build during the fall and winter. They gave incentives for early shipment so that they weren't doing the warehousing of product, the dealers were and would have ample supply to begin the spring selling year. By January, most of the initial orders had been built and shipped leaving the next few months to build a limited number of units for fill-in orders.

Simply stated, all tractors built August or later of the current year are next year's models just as the 2012 model year automobiles are already on the car lots. In the case of the 226, 1984 was the first "model year" for the 226 although production began late in 1983.

As for the "black frame" tractors, they are all 1984 model year tractors. That was the transition year immediately after Jack Ingersoll purchased the company and the only "model year" for the black frame with white seats & attachments.

Hope you find this information useful,

Bob
 

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Mjoe7 said:
That was interesting info. :thumbup:
Actually, I found it rather infuriating.

And I say that with absolutely no disrespect to Bob.

Since the early part of the 2000's, this "chart" that shows years and serial numbers has been the cornerstone that everyone in the Case community relied upon. To this date, I have no idea who compiled it or why. If it was done by an employee of Case or Ingersoll and then leaked to the outside world, then I'd still like to know how that chart came into being. Who instructed that person to make this chart? When was he told to put it together? What was the original purpose of it?

For many years now, I have known that this chart was flawed but until Bob's post, I had no idea just how flawed it really was. In essence, five months of intensive tractor production in a given model year does not show up on that chart. That comes very close to making that chart nearly useless. My fingers are wanting to type expletives in this post but my brain is overruling the digits. Needless to say.........I am very pissed at finding out that what I suspected is actually correct. This is one of those times when I loathe being right. What the hell were these guys at Winneconne thinking? Who does that? Show me a single car manufacturer that doesn't know the VIN of the very first car to roll down the assembly line in a given model year?

I have to stop now.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Not familiar with Internationals TRUCK division ? LOL !

They were awful too.... The model year on the title was the year it got sold. So, if it stood on the lot for 5 years, you got a truck 5 years older than the date on the title. Parts were the same baloney.... they'd use up stock before the next model year actually got various details, and this was especially true with grilles and marker/turn lenses. Kaiser was another one.

What amazes me is that we really have never come across someone who worked there for many years with a real in-depth knowledge of daily operations. A person like that could write a short book and make us all very happy.
 

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I bought a snowblower and chains from a guy 3 years ago that worked at the Case Ingersoll plant for over 20 years. He had stuff like you would not believe! When the company moved he retired and apparently bought everything the company did not want to move to Maine.
He had several tractors but also attachments everywhere. In the shed he had at least 50 different Case Ingersoll related items and he pointed to a old semi trailer and told me it was full of stuff!
Anyway; I said all that to say I may have to get a hold of this gentleman and pick his brain more in depth and introduce him to the website, I'm sure he could be a valuable member here. Now to figure out where he lives again. :headscratcher:

I also learned recently that a guy I work with his uncle worked at the Case Ingersoll plant. So there is another person I need to track down.

Last winter I bought a hydro vac, snow blade (just sold it today), and snowblower from a kid who's dad had passed away for $80.00. Well his dad used to work at the Case Ingersoll plant. Unfortunately it was all that was left of the equipment he had... and while I'm on this subject my very own dad who worked for Case most his whole life remembers picking up new Garden Tractors from the plant to deliver to the dealership he worked at. I'm in good company. :thumbsup: :grin:
 
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