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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,
I'm replacing a decent amount of the hoses on my case 644 and its missing a few hoses...
so far the ones I know that are missing are
  • C-18170
  • C-18176
If anyone has spare ones ( I'll purchase them if needed) or knows the size of the fittings so I can get the hoses replaced.
Any help would be appreciated
Thanks!
 

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'68 - Case 155, '73 - 646a
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Not quite a bed side reader, but.. I keep a copy of this manual https://www.discounthydraulichose.com/mm5/thread_guide.pdf on hand at all times, the Jic style fitting Case uses are on printed page 4, PDF page 6. Case used a lot of JIC 5's in the 64x's and its not the common of a size. AKA my local hydraulic shop does not stock Jic 5 hose ends.
 

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'68 - Case 155, '73 - 646a
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Looking into build your own options..

Something I looked into before are 'flareless' fittings that are compression on the steel line side and mate to Jic 37 fittings.. Found someone that sells a Jic 5 flareless nut - kit 418 - 37 JIC to Flareless Compresssion Convert-A-Flare Nut | HydraulicsDirect.com you'd need to source 5/16" steel line from a hydraulic or semi truck brakes shop. Or find someone that could make you a JIC 5 to Jic 5 rubber line of the correct length.. I did not find a manual for that brand, but 'swagelok' created this type of connection.. https://www.swagelok.com/downloads/webcatalogs/EN/MS-13-151.PDF

Since the loader runs at 1500 psi or less, I would have no problem using that system for the loader connections.. The main TCV system runs up into 2500, 2700 PSI and its a little more complicated..
 

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When I needed custom hoses I just installed a JIC5 to JIC6 adapter and then ran JIC 6 from there. JIC6 (3/8") steel hydraulic tubing is easy to source, easy to bend, and not terribly hard to flare the ends. There's no meaningful difference in hydraulic function or performance.

You can find JIC6 tube nuts and sleeves (ferrules) at multiple websites. I found mine on Ebay. I picked up 3/8" steel hydraulic tubing from my local hydraulics shop.

I bought a flaring tool similar to this:


and modified its flaring cone down to around 37 degrees. I've used it for steel line JIC connections up to JIC10 with no problems. The eccentric flaring action is really effective.

You can also buy a Ridgid branded version that's 37 degrees to begin with, but it's $200.
For some it would be worth the extra 165 dollars to get the "real" tool.

But rather than trying to track down expensive and hard to find JIC5, I'd just do it in JIC6 from here on.

Just remember to slide the nut and sleeves on the tubing BEFORE you flare it.

It's real frustrating if you forget. :)

Bob
 

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'68 - Case 155, '73 - 646a
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Hmm, I looked at several hydraulic suppliers for a Jic 5 -> 6 adapter. I never thought I would find it on Amazon:

Since this line runs from the Loader control valve to a 'bulk head' fitting on the side of the frame, he would need 2 Jic 5 Female to Jic 6 male adapters.

p.s I found this by taking the fitting - adapter code -> 2406 female to male adapter.. Then the 2 dash's are the size, so 2406-05-06 is a Jic 5 to Jic 6 adapter... Googling for "fitting 2406-05-06" finds suppliers..

When I needed custom hoses I just installed a JIC5 to JIC6 adapter and then ran JIC 6 from there.

Bob
 

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When I needed custom hoses I just installed a JIC5 to JIC6 adapter and then ran JIC 6 from there. JIC6 (3/8") steel hydraulic tubing is easy to source, easy to bend, and not terribly hard to flare the ends. There's no meaningful difference in hydraulic function or performance.

You can find JIC6 tube nuts and sleeves (ferrules) at multiple websites. I found mine on Ebay. I picked up 3/8" steel hydraulic tubing from my local hydraulics shop.

I bought a flaring tool similar to this:


and modified its flaring cone down to around 37 degrees. I've used it for steel line JIC connections up to JIC10 with no problems. The eccentric flaring action is really effective.

You can also buy a Ridgid branded version that's 37 degrees to begin with, but it's $200.
For some it would be worth the extra 165 dollars to get the "real" tool.

But rather than trying to track down expensive and hard to find JIC5, I'd just do it in JIC6 from here on.

Just remember to slide the nut and sleeves on the tubing BEFORE you flare it.

It's real frustrating if you forget. :)

Bob
Btw, one of these cheap tube bending tools will work fine on 3/8 steel hydraulic tubing


Bob
 
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