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:think: Does anyone have an LL20 forklift setup for their 648? I would love to get some measurements so I can fab up my own.It appears from the parts drawing that the tines are fixed with no ez side to side adjustment.I want make a set with normal Clark style sliding tines.I have access to a free set.Also ,does anyone know the purpose of the check valve setup?Thanks....here are the drawings.
 

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The valve is put there to hydraulically lock the cylinder whenever there is no flow being sent to it. This valve will allow you to carry a load on the forks for a distance without the forks tipping downward to the point of having the load slide off. It is an essential item to have when using forks or you will constantly be correcting the attitude of the forks thanks to the cylinder bleeding down.

https://www.grainger.com/Grainger/PRINC ... Pid=search

If I owned one of these loaders, the first thing I would do would be to make a scaled down copy of the quick-tach system used by modern skid steer loaders. Ingersoll did just that for their 7000 Series loaders. On my Case skid steer, I flip up two levers and off comes the bucket. Then on goes the forks and I flip the levers down to lock it in place.

Once I had that, then I'd design my own set of forks that allow me to slide them to any width I wish. Forks are an immensely useful attachment. I have pushed the forks tight together and used them to rip unwanted shrubs out of the ground with a minimum of disturbance to adjacent plants. They also make a formidable tool for demolition work.
 

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There's a guy on MTF I think it's blacksmithman that made a loader for an MTD 990 if I remember right and has a real nice quick attach setup on the bucket. I'll have to look later and try to find a picture.
 

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Thanks for the replies....Hydriv, you wouldn't have a couple of closeup pics of that system,would you? Pretty please :mrgreen: You are right...forks might be more useful than the bucket for everyday physical labor savings. Could you not do the same thing with a 3000psi ball valve and lock everything manually?
 

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cp7
Another important function of the load check valve is to prevent unintentional “dumping” which occurs to some degree with the bucket but is more significant with pallet forks.

For example, if you pick up a scoop of dirt, the load is relatively close to the lift pins. If you pull back slowly on the bucket curl lever, the valve will begin to open, but the bucket cylinder might backflow and “dip” slightly before beginning to curl up. Usually, not a big deal. With pallet forks, a lot of the load weight is moved further away from the lift pins. The added leverage puts a lot more pressure on the cylinder and makes the backflow (and dip) more dramatic.

Scenario without check valve:
You just lifted a pallet of fresh eggs. You notice the load is “sagging”, so you gently pull up on the curl lever, only to find that the pallet suddenly tilts down and you now have the makings of a large, free-range omelet all over your driveway.

Scenario with check valve:
The check valve locks the cylinder (independent of the spool valve). When you pull the lever to tilt the pallet up, the check valve keeps the cylinder “locked” (and the pallet load steady) until the incoming pump pressure overcomes the check valve pressure and positive oil flow to the cylinder begins. No backflow occurs, so no unintentional “dip”.

Moral:
Install a check valve or you might end up with egg on your place.
 

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Mr onetwo said:
Thanks for the replies....Hydriv, you wouldn't have a couple of closeup pics of that system,would you? Pretty please :mrgreen: You are right...forks might be more useful than the bucket for everyday physical labor savings. Could you not do the same thing with a 3000psi ball valve and lock everything manually?
As of this date, I have no info on the 7000 Series tractors. Why Eastman has not been more forthcoming with manuals for tractors built after 1988 is just another mystery. Especially since they no longer manufacture them.

The purpose behind the check valve is that it instantly locks the bucket cylinder whenever you stop sending oil to it in either direction and it instantly allows you to reposition the cylinder. Putting in some manually operated valve would get old pretty fast and you wouldn't be saving much once you factor in all the hydraulic hoses and fittings involved.
 

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Mr onetwo said:
:think: Does anyone have an LL20 forklift setup for their 648? I would love to get some measurements so I can fab up my own.It appears from the parts drawing that the tines are fixed with no ez side to side adjustment.I want make a set with normal Clark style sliding tines.I have access to a free set.Also ,does anyone know the purpose of the check valve setup?
I fabricated a copy of the OEM fork setup and will get you the measurements but give me a day or so. My first set of forks were made from standard 3" channel and worked quite well until I tried to dig a very large oak log out of the frozen ground and bent them--they were really more than adequate for everything I should have been using them for. I replaced them with some donated forklift forks that are probably rated at 5,000 lbs or more than 5x the capacity of the loader so they will not bend! I didn't bother with the slider setup because that involves a lot of extra weight that reduces the ultimate lifting capacity. The OEM forks and mine are attached with bolts so they can be moved but not quickly--hasn't been much of an issue for me. If you decide to bolt them on you will (if you haven't already) find that you cannot drill holes in forks with standard drill bits. I solved that problem by drilling and tapping some small blocks of mild steel for the bolts to screw into and then welded the blocks to the forks.

Tom's suggestion is also a good one if you anticipate switching back and forth among attachments. The quick attach system is more expensive since you have to purchase a mounting plate for each attachment in addition to the part that remains on the tractor.
 

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Individuals looking for a fairly nice way to add forks to their 600 series loaders might want to consider the method used on heavier equipment. I'm sure many of you have seen front end loaders that have 4 large "hooks" cut out of plate steel welded across the top of the bucket.....

I found a quick photo from one company with the concept:
https://www.forddistributing.com/produc ... llet-forks

Here are some forks made for this setup without the main cross rod:
http://www.allardequipmentsales.com/ima ... _forks.jpg

Looking at those forks, you have to imagine a solid shaft thru those holes up top. If the fork set was sitting in the yard somewhere, it would essentially just be two forks spread apart with the rod across the top. To use them, you just drive up to the fork set with the bucket still ON, tip the bucket forward enough to get the big hooks on top of the bucket under the rod, then roll the bucket back.

This setup works quite nice in that you have a lot of width adjustment, and you can grab it without "quick-taching" ANYTHING.... just go grab it ! And, it stores very compactly if you put pins in the top rod so you can take it all apart.
 

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Grummy's suggestion is a good one as long as you are not looking for maximum lifting capacity.

There are two negatives to these types of forks.

1. the weight of the bucket is NOT removed from the loader and therefore your lifting power is reduced by whatever your bucket weighs.


2. the forks are much further away from the bottom pin on the ends of the loader arms. That means a substantial amount of extra leverage working against the cylinder that is attempting to tilt the load and keep it level.


If you want maximum performance from your loader, then making your own kwik-tach system will overcome the above two deficiencies.
 

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The alzwelding set up is mechanically superior to the bucket-edge fork design. However, I think that I would add a stiffener to the top edge of the bucket to make sure it stays straight. I'd also weld some chain hooks onto the center and the outer edges.
 

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Mr. onetwo,
Ingersoll used the mini quick attach system. Here is a page from a brochure


Hops Farmer has a 7020 with the factory setup










Here is a description of the parts (old price list)

FQCAP Attachment Plate Front Loader * * $715
FQCFBA Female Blank Adaptor Plate * $92
FQCC48B Bucket Adaptor for Quick Attach * $169
FQCB4CF 48" Quick Attach Bucket 4 cf * N/A 160 lbs. $615
FQCB6CF 48" Quick Attach Bucket 6 cf * N/A 160 lbs. $710
LL20 Front Pallet Forks * 150 lbs. $725
 
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