Case Colt Ingersoll Tractors banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everybody! A long time ago I posted about my work of swapping a Kubota diesel into the 446 roller I bought. I am about to finish the engine rebuild and try a first start then I'll be ready to put the tractor itself under the knife (or plasma if you want to be picky). I have seen many different renditions for reinforcing the frame and would like to try to consolidate all of those ideas. I will be adding roughly 8 to 10 inches to the overall length of the tractor and the engine itself will be around 210lbs but mounted in a way that it adds rigidity to the frame. I know how I will be doing all this but have yet to put pen to paper since I'm still mulling it over and gathering further ideas. I also plan on building a front loader onto the tractor probably sometime next year or over the winter if possible (and wife permitting).

I am aware of the normal breaking point on the rear by the transaxle and plan on using a previous post's ideas on adding a "third member" of sorts between the cross member for the loader towers and the transaxle. Also I'll add the reinforcement ideas I have seen on here about welding in extra angle. I'm not scared of any sort of idea as I am already neck deep in custom fab work so the more the merrier as far as I am concerned.

Hopefully here in the next few weeks I'll be able to 3D scan the frame and motor and model up my ideas and send them in here for everyone's viewing pleasures and maybe help at least one other individual as insane as I am to try this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
459 Posts
From my observation, adding a loader to my 4020, I found that my tractor frame had 2 inherent "weaknesses" that needed correction (perhaps "lack of beefiness" is a better phrase than "weakness") and a new need for extra strength in the 2 main frame rails, since I was about to suspend a big heavy weight from them.

The weaknesses are: 1. The righthand frame rail necks down from 3.5" tall to only about 1.5" tall right where it goes up and over the brake drum shaft. See my post about it here:


2. In the area of the transaxle, the two main frame rails are attached together by two "U"-shaped crosspieces that are welded between the two frame rails. To attach the transaxle here, 3" long bolts go down through the top horizontal web of the frame rails, down through a hole in these "U"-shaped crossmembers, and thread into the casting of the transaxle. That bolt, when tightened, squeezes a hollow box formed by the top flange of the frame rail and the 3 sides of the welded in U channel. The harder you tighten that bolt, the more that box gets sqeezed out of shape. The bolt is strong enough to just crush the box if you really tighten it aggressively. I think that almost all of these tractors have at least some degree of distortion of the frame where the bolts go through, and that this distortion contributes to the weakness of the frame in that area. It's easily corrected though. I made a spacer from 1" round steel bar just tall enought to fill up the hollow of the "box". You slide the spacer in place before inserting the 3" bolt. That way when you bear down tight on the 3" bolts, they're just snugging up against solid "uncompressible" steel instead of a hollow box.

It's hard to express it all in words, in you're curious, check out this video I made of the process. Correcting both weaknesses discussed beginning at around the 48 minute mark.

The video also covers strengthening the main frame rails over and above anything envisioned by the factory, since I'm adding the stresses and weight of a loader suspended from them. So I beefed them up by welding 4X1.5X1/4" angle iron to the outer face of the frame rails. That process is covered earlier in the same video.
Rectangle Font Parallel Slope Number


This approach of adding the sistered on 4X1.5 angle iron would absolutely work for lengthening your frame rails, while also beefing them up for the extra weight of your diesel engine. It makes practically zero visible change to the machine, it doesn't take up any extra space, so it doesn't create access or maintenance issues, and I'm not sure there's any meaningfully easier way to go about it. You do have to carefully measure and then accurately drill the through holes for all the bolt penetrations. But that's the trickiest part.

Bob
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top