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I was curious about the size of gardens that members till with their case tractors.

In the spring I earn a little extra cash tilling gardens. I have only used a walk behind tiller but bought a tiller for my 224 last year with the intent of increasing the size of gardens I could take on. Once I advertised that I could take on larger gardens the first request is for a community garden. The size is 70, 20X20 plots. Is this taking on too much for a 224? I want to do it to stretch the machine and because I like playing in the dirt.

A sub compact tractor with a 5 foot tiller was used previously to till the community garden plots.
 

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I use my 155 to till up my wife's garden.. it is 30 x 50.. I usually go over it 4 or 5 times to turn under all the compost material that we spread over it.......... I believe that the 224 should handle that just fine.... it would be a lot of work, but you can do it!

Dave
 

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If you done tilling with walk behind you love 224 and tiller. 20X20 = 400 sq ft times 70 = 28,000 square feet and acre 43,560 feet that maybe off few feet because my memory, but close enough in this game. I think 5 hours tilling time be my guess. Using 10" turnplow first make faster if need till twice because plow pull as fast go low range travel, tilling as slow move in low range if go to fast tiller want go deep raise out soil because speed. Tractor setup 120 to 160 pounds on front 100 to 200 on each rear wheel, plus liquid in tires. Flow control makes travel speed constant and powerful. Front weigh first most important, next liquid rear tires, lastly wheel weights.
 

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I have 2 50x100 plots and the best way is to get a brinly single moldboard plow. What a difference. You can till to perfection after plowing.

Cant believe how much time I wasted breaking new ground by tilling from start to finish. MUCH faster with the plow. I now use the plow at the start of every season, then do the fine work with the tiller.
 
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