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Ingersoll 4016
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am very new to this forum, and Ingersoll tractors and Onan engines for that matter. Pardon my newbie ignorance. In my Introduction post, some members were asking me to describe my hard start issue on my 4016 tractor I just purchased. I looked in the forum library, no exact matches for my issue. I did find a post from 2012 for a Case 446 with somewhat similar hard start issue, but his turned out to be plug wires.

My exact issue is that I have to crank many times (4-6 times or more) before I can finally get the engine to fire (cold start after sitting for a day or more). Each crank is say about 5-10 seconds. I am afraid of burning out the starter. I sometimes need a quick squirt of starting fluid down the carb to help it along. I have not tried restarting it once warm. Per the manuals I have the choke closed, throttle up 1/3rd. Ingersoll manual says you can crank for up to 30 seconds, but then let sit for 3 minutes if no fire before attempting again. Onan manual says the same except one minute between tries. Fuel is good and fresh, plugs are relatively new (estimated <1 year old), plug wires appear to be correct Onan models, and fuel pump appears to be working as it runs fine once started. This is an electronic ignition tractor (no points), but it does have a condenser for some reason. I have verified the wiring is correct and intact.

Some of my thoughts were a possible bad fuel line, gummed up carburetor, or something electrical. These are guesses. I'd prefer not to throw parts at guesses. Also, battery is brand new with 350CCA. Manual says only need a 230 CCA battery. I trickle charge the battery to full charge, so I'm starting with a fully charged battery after each starting "session."

Tractor is very clean and has obviously be stored indoors or under cover. It has not been neglected, so those type of potential obvious "lack of "maintenance" items don't immediately come to mind as a potential cause.

Any insights or things to try would be highly appreciated. I'd like to get some confidence that this tractor will start when I need it, especially before the snow flies. Thank you all in advance.
 

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First I would change the fuel filter. That is the easiest first step.
Fuel lines do not last with modern fuel so the lines could be clogged. To change the fuel lines is easy but takes some time.
The carb could be gummed up also. But if it runs good once running then it’s probably not really the carb and more of a fuel pump/fuel delivery issue.
 

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I believe the ingersolls have the fuel pump that is not mounted to the carb so it should be easy enough to change that also.

i changed all the fuel lines in all my tractors last year. It was well worth the hassle
 

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Ingersoll 4016
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Welcome to the family! We are in CT feel free to email and we can try to help you or you can give us a call email for number [email protected] We sell, service and stock many used and new parts. But sounds like your might be something simple but can help trouble shoot with more info.
I tried emailing you at that address, the mail was returned as undeliverable. Is there another way to contact you?

Delivery has failed to these recipients or groups:
caseingersollt[email protected] ([email protected])
 

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Ingersoll 4016
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I believe the ingersolls have the fuel pump that is not mounted to the carb so it should be easy enough to change that also.

i changed all the fuel lines in all my tractors last year. It was well worth the hassle
Thank you JRP1. Yes, the fuel pump is external, so that could be an easy swap. The fuel filter is basically brand new, and the fuel inside is clear, with no orange tinge to it at all. I squeezed the fuel lines, they are still soft and pliable. I know that doesn't means the insides haven't melted or deteriorated. I may just swap them out, there are only two of them. Getting to the tank side might be difficult.
 

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Thank you JRP1. Yes, the fuel pump is external, so that could be an easy swap. The fuel filter is basically brand new, and the fuel inside is clear, with no orange tinge to it at all. I squeezed the fuel lines, they are still soft and pliable. I know that doesn't means the insides haven't melted or deteriorated. I may just swap them out, there are only two of them. Getting to the tank side might be difficult.
so to get to the fuel tank you need to remove the rear fenders. Since you have the cab maybe try blowing air into the line from the fuel filter location back into the tank and see if it’s clear or not.

next would be to check the connection and condition of the line that supplies the pressure to activate the fuel pump. Make sure that there is no air/pressure being loss from there.

when you are starting the tractor are you able to watch the fuel filer to see what that is doing? Is it being drained of fuel or can you see fuel moving around?

if you squirt staring fluid into the intake early into the starting process does it start right up?
 

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1973 Case 444, 1974 Case 644, 1976 Case 446, 1977 Case 646
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I would caution anyone using compressed air back into the tank. I tired that a few weeks ago on a 226 and the compromised fuel line blew off the tank and spewed nasty old gas on the shop floor. I quickly grabbed some rags to mop it up but the smell lingered for days. When removing the fenders and tank I seen the fuel line that was soft and damaged. I will never try that again! I will always removed the parts to get to the fuel line on the tank to inspect. WHAT A STENCH!

Keep the ✌
Harry
 

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I would caution anyone using compressed air back into the tank. I tired that a few weeks ago on a 226 and the compromised fuel line blew off the tank and spewed nasty old gas on the shop floor. I quickly grabbed some rags to mop it up but the smell lingered for days. When removing the fenders and tank I seen the fuel line that was soft and damaged. I will never try that again! I will always removed the parts to get to the fuel line on the tank to inspect. WHAT A STENCH!

Keep the ✌
Harry
The good news Harry is AJ has fresh gas in his tank not the old nasty stuff. 😂

on a serious note I should be more clear. Do not put 120 psi to your fuel line. And do make sure your fuel cap is removed so the fuel doesn’t come back at you under pressure.

i have a Milwaukee M12 tire inflator that I use to blow out the fuel lines. Or I set my air compressor to 25psi.
 

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Ingersoll 4016
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Special thanks to Rockland Valley. He helped me figure out my issue. Ended up being a bad coil, which I have replaced. Resistance between the plug wire holes was >31,000 ohms (with around 20,000 ohms being the resistance of a functioning coil). Coil was the original Onan 166-0761 which I replaced with an Onan 166-0820. They are quite different. Old on sat in a recess and bolted down. New one doesn't fit in the same hole or have any provision to bolt down. Now I'm looking for a retrofit bracket, so I can get this new coil secured down. Doesn't seem to be commercially available anymore.
 
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