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An ammeter would be redundant with the voltmeter already installed. Either hydraulic oil temp or pressure would be my choices.

Cheers,
Gordy
 

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Discussion Starter #62
An ammeter would be redundant with the voltmeter already installed. Either hydraulic oil temp or pressure would be my choices.

Cheers,
Gordy
Funny you should say that.

About an hour after posting, I ordered an oil temp gauge...
 

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Discussion Starter #63 (Edited)
Setting out the internal layout and needed to put the sheet metal on for positioning and clearancing purposes. Snapped a quick pic:

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Looking pretty good. Looking less and less like a “lawn tractor” every day.

Getting pretty tight for real estate inside though:

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All that space in the front is going to be filled with a hydraulic tank/reservoir and ducting for the hyd cooler fan.

Even then, there’s more to go in and its only going to get tighter as more system get crammed in there....
 

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Discussion Starter #66
So, building ip the hydraulic tank. Just using cardboard to make the template. Looks like I’ll end up with a a 2.6 US Gal cpacity, of which I’ll loose some of when I leave room for heat expansion.

Probably closer to 2.4 gallons once all said and done. I’m a touch concerned with that as it will have to supply both pumps and have enough to run the hydrive, steering, 3 pt and loader
 

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There will be oil in the cooler, pipes, hose, motor, and pumps. Maybe another 1-2 quarts.
 

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I want to say with a guess my 6018lbh has about that size tank. I think you will be just fine.

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cylinders should really be the only variable consumer of oil. the motors gain nor lose oil when engaged. the extremes would be all cylinders fully retracted and all cylinders fully extended. you can find what that differential volume is and if its less than the size of the tank (minus some appropriate reserve) then you should be all set.
 

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Discussion Starter #70 (Edited)
Prototyping the front end setup.

Inner support structure:

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although its good a strong as it is, I will likely add another cross support at the front to help carry the load of the components mounted to the structure. I’m a big fan of “over - building” and since this is a tractor and not an airplane, I pretty much don’t have to be concerned with extra weight.

cooler:

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I’ll add some “foam” to the bracketsso the cooler will have some isolation from vibration.

Prototyping the tank:

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thats just for size and shape. A couple internal baffles will help de-aerate the returning fluid before re-entering the pump feed lines.

front sheetmetal in place:

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Its all pretty tight in there, but it all fits. Thats 1/4 x 1” flat stock so its pretty solid. Its only tacked in place for now, but I can almost lift the front end up by it. The electric fan will fit nicely up to the cooler and then its building the shrouding to direct and exit the air.
 

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1973 Case 444, 1974 Case 644, 1976 Case 446, 1977 Case 646
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Nobrand, it looks Heavy Duty! I like Heavy Duty, nice fabrication!
Keep the Peace
Harry
 

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Discussion Starter #73 (Edited)
Home made muffler? looks like it, or bigger one welded one quitter?.............Curt
Its from a Kohler 18 hp magnum from my Argo:

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I changed out the Argo exhaust because the oem setup exited right in front of the passenger compartment, making for a loud and smelly ride. You can see the new exhaust exiting at the rear of the rig in the pics above. Before, it just had a turn down right at the square opening in the front.

When the Briggs muffler rotted out, I adapted the Kohler muffler to the Briggs. Still a bit more work to do to it, but only small things like adding springs to hold it tightly to the exhaust ports and a lick of high temp paint.
 

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Discussion Starter #74 (Edited)
Feeling slow today, didn’t feel like getting much done so I just messed with the “dash” area:

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finished up (mostly) the instrument “pod”, filled some holes, took out a few areas (ie: formed areas for previous controls), mounted the choke and throttle levers and popped in the rocker switches.

looks ok to my eye. Plenty good for a garden tractor. A skim of bondo will flatten it all out nicely.
 

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Build is looking nice. Good about of progress you have done. What ideas are you coming up with as far as the loader masts go?

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Discussion Starter #76 (Edited)
Build is looking nice. Good about of progress you have done. What ideas are you coming up with as far as the loader masts go?

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Still working that out. Thinking something along these lines:

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I’d like to build something that is functional but also has a bit of visual interest in it. I’m not a fan of the loaders where guys build them out of straight square tubes. They get the job done just fine, but I find them kind of...boring....to the eye.

the pic above is a little bit more work to build than using square tube, but its nothing a sheet of 3/16” plate, a plasma cutter, TIG and some time can’t handle...
 

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Discussion Starter #77 (Edited)
Hydraulic tank coming along:

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Quick look at it in place on the tractor:

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Taking a pause for the duty cycle on my TIG right now. Plus, I’m old and I just wanted to take a break.

;)

There’s plenty of space around the air cleaner housing, the pic angle makes it look like its tight against it.

You’ll have to pardon my crap AL welding. I’m not a professional and I haven’t tig’d AL for many months now so I’m waaaaay out of practice.
You’ll have to pardon my crap AL welding. I’m not a professional and I haven’t tig’d AL for many months now so I’m waaaaay out of practice.

It’s solid and water tight, so I can’t ask for much more than that from my skill level. I’d love to be able to lay a “stack of dimes”, but I just don’t do enough of it to get that good at it.
 

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1973 Case 444, 1974 Case 644, 1976 Case 446, 1977 Case 646
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Nobrand, with TIG especially on Aluminum you have to have it clean which it looks great. The other item is dipping the filler into the puddle and move quickly. It does not look to bad to me, I've seen a whole lot worst, with black contamination and holes in the weld. By the time you done you'll be seeing the stack of dimes. A little clean up and no one will know anyways. Keep up the great job!

Keep the Peace
Harry
 

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Discussion Starter #79 (Edited)
Nobrand, with TIG especially on Aluminum you have to have it clean which it looks great. The other item is dipping the filler into the puddle and move quickly. It does not look to bad to me, I've seen a whole lot worst, with black contamination and holes in the weld. By the time you done you'll be seeing the stack of dimes. A little clean up and no one will know anyways. Keep up the great job!

Keep the Peace
Harry
Oh, I know what to do. I clean with a dedicated SS brush and an acetone wipe down. I’m just not consistent enough due to not enough practice or infrequent use.

In short: my technique sucks!

:)

I can run a decent bead for a couple inches and then I loose it again. Mostly because I always seem to have trouble with feeding the rod. I’m no good at the “finger shuffle” and as mentioned, I just don’t do it enough to develop the fine points of TIG on aluminum.

Not to mention, I still occasionally get caught out by all the other things guys mess up when starting out like contaminating the tungsten with the rod, dipping the puddle, etc.
 

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1973 Case 444, 1974 Case 644, 1976 Case 446, 1977 Case 646
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Feeding the filler is a common problem for most people in TIG and Oxy Fuel Welding. They even have a wire feeding tool that slides the wire with a thumb wheel. I've never used one but I've seen some welders use them. When I'm doing TIG I weld a few inches and then I have to move my hand on the wire. I momentarily back off on the peddle just a little and stick the wire in the puddle then slide the wire in my hand then hit the peddle and unstick the wire and start moving again. It takes a little finesse and practice but since I've been doing it a long time it just comes natural. Try it on a practice piece and let me know what you think.

Keep the Peace
Harry
 
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