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A few things to look at:
Front wheel bearings (bad bearings on one side will not let the tractor sit level in front)
Attachment pins, (where the plow support slips on)
Area of the plow support that engages the attachment pins.
Latch pins (the ones with springs)
Plow pivot bolt
Plow pivot bracket for bent (the piece with the 5 holes to angle the plow)
This piece can get bent in the area where the holes are and can be straightened on a press.
Check these areas and get back to us.
I use my plow with the blade locked with a pin so it will not flop over with the springs and this puts more stress on both the plow parts and the tractor and I inspect these areas periodically.
Mad Mackie in CT :mrgreen: :lol: :geek:
 

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Animal,
Bob gave you a list of things to check, Something is either bent or your pins (pivot points)are sloppy. Also check the blade trip pivot joint, The tabs (welded to the blade) could be bent.

If you raise the blade, Positioned straight, not angled, stand off to one side, And rock it up + down and watch the areas Bob mentioned, you will see where the slop is.

kubotakid :usa2:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have it forward not angled. When I raise the plow and lift on the low side the entire tractor begins to raise up. So this would tell me there is no slop. There is no slop in the pivot pin.The slots that go around the pins have very minimal ware. The plow is like new but that doesn't mean the previous owner didn't do something. I will check the air pressure in all the tires and make sure they are even. Maybe one of the pins that hold the front wheels is bent? The bearings could be replaced as I believe they are a little worn.
 

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I have a '77 446 that has the same problem. I thought that it had a bent spindle. I replaced both spindles and that did not fix the problem. The problem was found to be a bent frame. It appears to have been torqued to the right somehow. The rear end is fine so I have been using it with a three point for the last few years. I use it to plow, till and drag my driveway with a rear blade. The tilt in the front seems to have no effect on the rear attachments.

I ran across a replacement frame with a very close SN a while ago, and I plan to transfer everything to the other frame and restore the tractor. I likely will be saying this five years from now....
 

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The blade frame (and perhaps tractor) may bend and twist if a shock load while hitting an obstruction, was applied when the blade was angled one direction or the other. Again, though its a misconception that the blade springs are going to protect for everything, the springs become much less effective if the leading tip edge of the blade hits something like a curb, hole, rock, etc. while the blade is angled because the spring relief direction is not in the same plane of travel as the tractor directional travel. The springs are most effective when the blade is square to the tractor and the obstruction contacts dead center of the blade's width. I have a blade bent as such that I bought where it was whacked and not only is the frame of it bent, so is the blade's outer width, and so is my tractor frame slightly in a twist as noted by the way the hood closes.

If its really bad, and assuming no slop, I'd have the tractor sitting on concrete, equalized tire pressres, and start measuring at key points on the blade, blade frame, attaching points, and tractor frame. It may be helpful to support the tractor on jackstands/blocks with cedar shingle shims to level it to the floor...I've done this with full size tractor loader backhoes where front loader arms are bent but the subframe was fine. It requires time-patience to find it, like most of we perfectionists we like them square... A line level and a string, and/or other known good levels work.. If its only a matter of an inch or two or three off, I wouldn't myself waste time on it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The pin in the center of the front axel. Is that spring loaded? Could it be weak on one side? I was looking at the tires to see how mutch pressure to put in them and quess what. It is not on the sidewall like a car tire. What pressure should the front and back tires be filled to?
 

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animalsonly said:
The pin in the center of the front axel. Is that spring loaded? Could it be weak on one side? I was looking at the tires to see how mutch pressure to put in them and quess what. It is not on the sidewall like a car tire. What pressure should the front and back tires be filled to?
I think your owners manual calls for 8 psi front and rear, up to 14psi in front for certain attachments, which would be listed in that attachment manual. Alway's best to check your manual. :thumbsup:
 

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So you're saying with your plow in the straight position, with it raised up in the air, pushing on it doesn't reveal any loose or worn pins/pivet points?

If it doesn't I would start looking at the frame like Jack said.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I am assuming it is the tractor. I did stand on the high corner and bounce it a few times. That tweeked it a bit. Enough that I can live with. This came from tractor that was sitting unused for the last 16 years. Aparently it (plow) was only used one season then put in the barn. It has some surface rust on the scraper blade but the back is still in origional (faded) paint.
 

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animalsonly said:
I am assuming it is the tractor. I did stand on the high corner and bounce it a few times. That tweeked it a bit. Enough that I can live with. This came from tractor that was sitting unused for the last 16 years. Aparently it (plow) was only used one season then put in the barn. It has some surface rust on the scraper blade but the back is still in origional (faded) paint.
Try deflating the rear tire some on one side, then the other and watch for blade leveling. Both fronts need equal inflation.

Another way would be to remove hood, lay a 4 foot carpenters level across the front frame rails. Use a jack or use rear tire deflation side 1, then side 2. Watch for front blade levelling. Do this on a leveled concrete floor you checked with the level.

As you jack one side and see blade level to floor, install cedar shingle shims under the tire and lower jack on shims until vehicle weight is supported on tires. Once blade is level, you can remove the shingle stack and measure for thickness of shims. It will be close to how much accumulated blade and tractor frame twist exists,... you may not be able to remove it unless obviously narrowed down. Its a bear to find, but possible.

Post some pics if poss. Maybe others will see something.
 

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animalsonly said:
I am assuming it is the tractor. I did stand on the high corner and bounce it a few times. That tweeked it a bit. Enough that I can live with. This came from tractor that was sitting unused for the last 16 years. Aparently it (plow) was only used one season then put in the barn. It has some surface rust on the scraper blade but the back is still in origional (faded) paint.
PS (which side is higher? Left or right, as viewed from the operators seat)
(how much side to side difference is there as measured from the other blade extreme tip edge?)
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
It was about 3" high on the left hand side as viewed from the drivers seat. It does sit completely flat on the cement when I lower it. But in soft dirt it will transfer to angle to the ground.
 

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animalsonly said:
It was about 3" high on the left hand side as viewed from the drivers seat. It does sit completely flat on the cement when I lower it. But in soft dirt it will transfer to angle to the ground.
I'm not sure that I understand your concern here.

Generally speaking, these blades are meant for two areas of work. Plowing snow or working with dirt. In the world of plowing snow, the blade is supposed to move freely on the center pivot so that the cutting edge can ride flat on the surface in spite of what the truck or tractor that is pushing it is doing. In the world of bulldozers, there are three types of blades.....2 way (up/down), 4 way (up/down and angle left/right) and 6 way ( up/down, left/right and tilt left/right). You have a 4 way blade and it will never have the surgical precision that a fully powered 6-way blade has because of the fact that it must "float" on that center pivot pin.

If you want to grade dirt or aggregate in a more precise manner, then you need 400 Series tractor that is fitted with loaded Ag tires, wheel weight kit, 3 point hitch and a decent Box Blade. You leave your Utility Blade on the front as a counter-weight and to do the rough grading because it is best suited for that work. The 3 pt hitch has two adjustments that will allow you to alter the tilt angle of the box blade as well as how aggressively it cuts the incoming dirt.

Even if your frame is slightly tweaked, straightening it won't solve your problem. That is not to say you shouldn't go over the complete blade along with the Snap Fast mount on the tractor and correct any sloppiness or bent brackets/mounts etc. Naturally, if you want the blade to perform at its best, then everything should be restored back to the way it was when it was new. Perhaps I'm wrong but I get the sense that you expect this blade to do more for you than what it was originally designed to do. Every attachment has its limitations and that's one of the reasons why there are so many attachments available.
 

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animalsonly said:
It was about 3" high on the left hand side as viewed from the drivers seat. It does sit completely flat on the cement when I lower it. But in soft dirt it will transfer to angle to the ground.
Agree with others...3" is going to be hard to get out. And even if it were corrected, the first slam into a dirt pile will put another twist back in because it has a central push frame which isn't ridgid enough to be perfectly level.
 
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