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'73 220, '74 646
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Had a thought of converting a 4ft brush to a hydracutter. 4ft is kinda hard to find though, can find 5ft all day. What's the thoughts on these tractor's running a 5ft.
 

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'68 - Case 155, '73 - 646a
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What I wound up with.. Since Hydracutters are scarce and pricey when you find one was a 42" 'bush hog"

Motor vehicle Grass Gas Machine Metal


I gave a local $75 for the mower with NO engine and then scrapped a cheap riding mower for the 12HP vertical Briggs on it.. The problem with these and why it had no engine is that taking this on side hills will starve the engine of oil and cause it to throw a rod.. Which a hydracutter does not have issues with.. BUT, you would also have the tractor on a side hill if you're doing that with a hydracutter.

I have since pulled the wheels, and tongue off this and set it up on the 3 point on my 646.. Works well enough for cutting high weeds and raspberry kinds of stuff.
 

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1982 446 1988 446
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Once my diesel swap 446 is done I plan on making my own brush hog. I'm gonna take a spare 44" case deck I have and make it exactly like the case 3 point finish mower. Except mine will be brush only so idk if I'll use blades or figure something else different out like a traditional brush hog.





I too wanted a hydracutter but they are ridiculously priced when you do find one and I'm pretty sure in my research the original hydraulic motor is no longer made.

This type of home built brush hog wouldn't be that hard to do IMO.
 

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I have 2 48” bush hogs and my experience using them on my kubota b6100 and 7100 tells
me that my case would do a wheelie just trying to lift it. My b6100 has an fel and does just fine with the bush hog, the 7100 had 3x55lb suitcase weights up front (and a liquid cooled diesel engine, 4wd front axle etc..way heavier up front than a case) and that one did not steer well if you lifted the bush hog. Those have steering brakes.. case doesnt.

So i would say.. it would be ok if your front end is weighted down pretty good or if you can move the cutter closer to your machine. But from this experience and never having seen a hydracutter in person, i suspect your typical cat1 48” bush hog is built much heavier than the factory hydracutter and that wuld make them a little more bothersome to use on a case.
 

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Once my diesel swap 446 is done I plan on making my own brush hog. I'm gonna take a spare 44" case deck I have and make it exactly like the case 3 point finish mower. Except mine will be brush only so idk if I'll use blades or figure something else different out like a traditional brush hog.





I too wanted a hydracutter but they are ridiculously priced when you do find one and I'm pretty sure in my research the original hydraulic motor is no longer made.

This type of home built brush hog wouldn't be that hard to do IMO.
For someone of your capabilities... this motor right here

will spin at 4150RPM, fed with 9GPM of oil. It wouldn't take too much imagination to work out a pulley arrangement to power a hydracutter from it.

FWIW.
 

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Once my diesel swap 446 is done I plan on making my own brush hog. I'm gonna take a spare 44" case deck I have and make it exactly like the case 3 point finish mower. Except mine will be brush only so idk if I'll use blades or figure something else different out like a traditional brush hog.





I too wanted a hydracutter but they are ridiculously priced when you do find one and I'm pretty sure in my research the original hydraulic motor is no longer made.

This type of home built brush hog wouldn't be that hard to do IMO.
There are brush hog like swing blades for mowers, but they are advertised as mulching blades. So I don't know how they would handle brush. If you try them remember to go slow, the spindles are small (3/4") and may bend with heavy/hard use.


I borrowed a brush hog years ago to make some walking trails. The result was hand digging the stumps out, as they were trip hazards and would punch holes in the light 2 ply garden tractor tires :(

Cheers,
Gordy
 

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'68 - Case 155, '73 - 646a
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The interesting thing about the GT 42 tow behind mower is that the center spindle is basically a wheel hub. it looks a WHOLE lot light a john boat trailer hub or the hubs on the CCI Loaders 64x, 60xx and is about 1 - 1/14 diameter shaft on it.. It is spinning a single 42 inch long, 4 - 5 inch wide double edged, reversible, blade.

Font Parallel Auto part Automotive exterior Engineering

I'll throw the parts - service manual out here too, might give you some ideas. The manual covers the 42" that I have and they also made a 48 inc model. Of course the decks are NOwhere as thick as a PTO driven bushhog and I actually have my 42" mounted on the three point. Of course a 646 loader as a nice front counter weight..


the spindles are small (3/4") and may bend with heavy/hard use.

Cheers,
Gordy
 

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Vehicle wheel bearings are an unsung hero of DIY projects in my opinion.. They can be extremely cheap and the durability is through the roof compared to anything else you can slap together for the same money. You can sometimes get a vehicle bolt-on wheel bearing+hub assembly for the same price as one smaller-sized pillow block bearing (which you would need at least two of!). Rockauto.com has crazy low prices on things like that sometimes. The hard part is, unless you're a mechanic with a semi-encyclopedic knowledge of what vehicles have which sort of thing, it's a long tedious process searching up all the workable pieces to check prices, dimensions, etc. But just to ballpark the whole thing, when i buy cheap vehicle wheel bearing+hub assemblies online, the normal low end of the price range is ~32-45 bucks or so. Cheap ones might be $20.
 

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For someone of your capabilities... this motor right here

will spin at 4150RPM, fed with 9GPM of oil. It wouldn't take too much imagination to work out a pulley arrangement to power a hydracutter from it.

FWIW.
I would think you'd need a motor with more torque no? I'm not to well versed on hydraulic motor knowledge to know how to pick one for the right application.
 

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I would think you'd need a motor with more torque no? I'm not to well versed on hydraulic motor knowledge to know how to pick one for the right application.
You're probably right. I clearly thought it was easier than it really is. I was only looking at "cubic inches per revolution" and there's clearly more to it than that. That motor wouldn't work. Its larger 1.5 cubic inch version seems like it might work, as it delivers 13HP and much greater torque. But now that I think about it, it's likely that neither one of them has an adequate bearing on the output shaft necessary to sustain the side tension of a pulley.

So I remain confident that some resource could spec the right motor, and the right motor clearly exists. But like you, I'm clearly not well versed on hydraulic motor knowledge to know how to pick one for the right application.

Bob
 

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1993 Ingersoll 4118, 1984 Case 448
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If you have not already seen it, this is a good thread on a hydracutter build.

The hydraulic motors used by Case Ingersoll in the high speed attachments were in the .75 to .85 cubic inch size. Pulley sizes were adjusted to achieve proper speed.
 

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You're probably right. I clearly thought it was easier than it really is. I was only looking at "cubic inches per revolution" and there's clearly more to it than that. That motor wouldn't work. Its larger 1.5 cubic inch version seems like it might work, as it delivers 13HP and much greater torque. But now that I think about it, it's likely that neither one of them has an adequate bearing on the output shaft necessary to sustain the side tension of a pulley.

So I remain confident that some resource could spec the right motor, and the right motor clearly exists. But like you, I'm clearly not well versed on hydraulic motor knowledge to know how to pick one for the right application.

Bob
Just to kind of help out here, the majority of your torque on the deck should be coming from multiplication across the pulleys. I know on my Husq-junk riding mower the output pulley from the motor is a lot larger than any of the pulleys on the deck giving it quite a bit of multiplication. It's a 22hp briggs and it might put out 35 ft-lbs of torque with my fingers and toes crossed and it drives a 46" deck with zero bogging issues no matter what I've put it in. So in theory the motor you provided will turn 15 ft-lbs of torque and with a 2:1 ratio on your pulleys you can get 30ft-lbs which should be plenty to drive a small deck. Beyond that the only thing you'd have to worry about is your blade rpm which shouldn't be much more than 3000rpm so you'd have to limit your flow rate to achieve the proper rpm on the blades. I'm not 100% sure but I'd imagine the torque curve on a hydraulic motor is pretty flat so you can probably pick just about anywhere on the rpm plot and get it to work.

This is a long way of saying you can probably use a lot smaller motor than you'd think. I took a lot of mechanical classes, however, we briefly touched on hydraulics so I definitely don't consider myself an expert, just more like a Google summarizer....
 

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You're probably right. I clearly thought it was easier than it really is. I was only looking at "cubic inches per revolution" and there's clearly more to it than that. That motor wouldn't work. Its larger 1.5 cubic inch version seems like it might work, as it delivers 13HP and much greater torque. But now that I think about it, it's likely that neither one of them has an adequate bearing on the output shaft necessary to sustain the side tension of a pulley.

So I remain confident that some resource could spec the right motor, and the right motor clearly exists. But like you, I'm clearly not well versed on hydraulic motor knowledge to know how to pick one for the right application.

Bob
The concern of side tension of a pulley, could be addressed with a couple bearings and a short shaft with the pulley on one end and a lovejoy on the other end, that the hydraulic motor would connect to.

Cheers,
Gordy
 

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The concern of side tension of a pulley, could be addressed with a couple bearings and a short shaft with the pulley on one end and a lovejoy on the other end, that the hydraulic motor would connect to.

Cheers,
Gordy
Gordy, you make some good points.

On a side note, after I got looking around, I couldn't help myself, and spent some funny money on one of these:

and over on Ebay, I bought one of these: Machter Auto Wheel Hub Assembly 2MA:16x16x14.5cm | eBay

I'm really itching to play around with hydraulic driven attachments, and a $60 investment is cheap enough to try it.

I plan to mate the motor body to the hub body, and then connect the motor's output tab to the wheel flange. Then I'll mount either a pulley or sprocket onto the wheel flange. There are several attachments I've considered building using my loader's the third function valve. I've considered a stump grinder, a post hole digger, and a concrete mixer. I think the stump grinder is too much for this motor, and I don't have a real need for a post hole digger. So I'll probably take a shot at building a concrete mixer. I think once it's geared way down to 25rpm or so, this motor would probably run it ok.

Once I get the project underway, I'll create a new forum posting to cover it.

Bob
 

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Gordy, you make some good points.

On a side note, after I got looking around, I couldn't help myself, and spent some funny money on one of these:

and over on Ebay, I bought one of these: Machter Auto Wheel Hub Assembly 2MA:16x16x14.5cm | eBay

I'm really itching to play around with hydraulic driven attachments, and a $60 investment is cheap enough to try it.

I plan to mate the motor body to the hub body, and then connect the motor's output tab to the wheel flange. Then I'll mount either a pulley or sprocket onto the wheel flange. There are several attachments I've considered building using my loader's the third function valve. I've considered a stump grinder, a post hole digger, and a concrete mixer. I think the stump grinder is too much for this motor, and I don't have a real need for a post hole digger. So I'll probably take a shot at building a concrete mixer. I think once it's geared way down to 25rpm or so, this motor would probably run it ok.

Once I get the project underway, I'll create a new forum posting to cover it.

Bob
For low speed attachment like an auger you may want to look at a motor like the tiller ran. I believe they were around 10. cubic inch displacement.
 

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and over on Ebay, I bought one of these: Machter Auto Wheel Hub Assembly 2MA:16x16x14.5cm | eBay

I'm really itching to play around with hydraulic driven attachments, and a $60 investment is cheap enough to try it.
Wow, i never realized motors could be so cheap, $29..

As far as the wheel bearing, just make sure whatever shaft you put through the middle can tension/preload the bearing assembly. There are some 2wd truck front wheel bearings that don't need preload (but they're kinda huge) but most wheel bearings that a CV axle goes through rely on the nut on the CV axle to preload the bearing assembly. Typically on a car it's a big torque number around 100-200lbft, but the 'side load' on that bearing when its on the car is tremendous.. in my opinion a much lower preload force can be used for something that really only has to deal with belt tension as a side load. The issue is if there is NO preload the bearings can actually 'separate'. So some amount of clamp is needed by whatever shaft goes through there. Some kind of shoulder the catch the inner bearing race on the inside, and a nut&washer on the other side, in the 'pocket' of the hub. (y)
 

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Wow, i never realized motors could be so cheap, $29..

As far as the wheel bearing, just make sure whatever shaft you put through the middle can tension/preload the bearing assembly. There are some 2wd truck front wheel bearings that don't need preload (but they're kinda huge) but most wheel bearings that a CV axle goes through rely on the nut on the CV axle to preload the bearing assembly. Typically on a car it's a big torque number around 100-200lbft, but the 'side load' on that bearing when its on the car is tremendous.. in my opinion a much lower preload force can be used for something that really only has to deal with belt tension as a side load. The issue is if there is NO preload the bearings can actually 'separate'. So some amount of clamp is needed by whatever shaft goes through there. Some kind of shoulder the catch the inner bearing race on the inside, and a nut&washer on the other side, in the 'pocket' of the hub. (y)
Excellent point. I'll be sure to do that.

Bob
 
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