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Ingersoll 446
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Picked up an Ingersoll 446 a couple of months back, with a pressing need to snowblow my driveway, and cut my grass. Bought as running, but running roughly.

Over the past couple of months, I've gone through and fixed about a hundred things (new coil, new condenser, valves adjusted, wiring repaired, clutch adjusted, fins cleaned, carb rebuilt, fuel pump rebuilt, fuel lines replaced, snowcaster repaired & chute painted, timing adjusted, throttle lever repaired, breather cleaned, intake manifold sealed)

This is where the screw up happened: Checked the oil, and it seemed to high. I siphoned some out. At the time, I didn't know about the oil tube creating a vacuum and reading higher. I also didn't realize that the dip stick can be pushed in past the crimp, and read higher.

Fast forward to engine finally running well, pushing it through some heavy snow. Bang. No compression on right side cylinder. Pulled head off, piston not moving. Suspect con rod is busted, caused by lack of oil.

I would love some guidance on next steps. My game plan is to pull the engine off the frame, open her up, and check the damage. If not too bad, will replace the con rod, put new rings on both sides, hone, de-carbon everything, and put back together. Does that seem reasonable? I don't want this to become more of a project than it needs to be, so looking for the minimum viable solution to getting this machine back up and running.

Edit: Engine is a B43M, no oil filter.

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Recommend you contact Boomer once you get it apart. He has parts and his Knowledge is priceless...

 

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HI Guy
Sure sorry to here about your engine
I've had a few Onan powered engine tractors lots of good reading in the Onan Engine Section
(1) Search results for query: Onan Engine dip stick fix | Case Colt Ingersoll Tractors
The Onan guys here always told me to check your oil twice and keep it topped off
Boomer one of the best around here, he's rebuilt many engines for our members and has plenty of Engine parts
When you find some time go back and do a search "right side cylinder problem"
I wish you good luck with your rebuild

bigman 🎯
 

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As long as the engine is out you may as well give it and the frame a deep cleaning. Also, look closely at the pto clutch for wear and look at everything in that tower to see if anything is in need of adjustment or replacement (hoses, clamps, wiring, choke and throttle cables, tcv linkage, etc..)

Good luck.
 

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Ingersoll 446
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Update, I got it apart and inspected the damage.

Good:
  • Cylinder bore looks good
  • Engine case is good
  • Oil tube is good
Bad:
  • Con rod gone
  • Piston damaged
  • Aluminum smeared onto the crank

I'll contact boomer to arrange for parts. Would it be foolish to attempt removing the aluminum from the crank in-situ with muriatic or lye? Figure I could soak a rag in it, and wrap it around the crank journal?
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Muriatic acid will dissolve the welded on aluminum on the crank throw. Just soak it for a bit, in a well ventilated area. You need the crank out to do this and you will need it out to measure the bearings properly anyways. I did a kohler a couple of years ago. Took about half an hour. Another tip, When you mike the bores, be sure to measure at the top AND bottom of the cylinders in both directions. Onan cylinders often wear even more egg shaped at the BOTTOM of the bore due to rod angularity mid stroke.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Muriatic acid will dissolve the welded on aluminum on the crank throw. Just soak it for a bit, in a well ventilated area. You need the crank out to do this and you will need it out to measure the bearings properly anyways. I did a kohler a couple of years ago. Took about half an hour. Another tip, When you mike the bores, be sure to measure at the top AND bottom of the cylinders in both directions. Onan cylinders often wear even more egg shaped at the BOTTOM of the bore due to rod angularity mid stroke.
Ok, time to share some of my ignorance... what do I do about the bore if it's egg shaped? Is there a tolerance within which I'm fine to just hone vs. getting it machined?

Also, mic the bearings you say... are we talking about the crank journal bearings? What do I do with this information once I have it?
 

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If the bore is egg shaped/out if round new rings will leak/and take forever to seat and it will burn oil and loose some compression. If you download the engine manual here, all the specs and tolerances for the cylinder and bearings are in it. To measure, while a dial bore gauge is sweet, with a little practice, telescoping bore gauges work nice too. You also will need to borrow a micrometer for the crank journals and another for the cylinder. Once you get your measurements, then you can plan your path forward.
 

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I agree with dundee222 ... you'll want to remove the crankshaft to clean it up and measure it. It's not that difficult to remove but will require buying, renting, borrowing, and/or making some puller tools to remove the flywheel & timing gear.

I prefer to use lye (heavy duty oven cleaner) to remove aluminum from crankshafts. I think it takes a little longer than muriatic acid but the fumes aren't quite as bad. Still want to use in a well ventilated area though. And if you do go with acid, be careful where you store it. Years ago I left a bottle of muriatic acid in a shed ... not sure if the cap wasn't tight or if the container wasn't completely sealed, but a few days later I noticed that fumes from the acid had caused some light surface rust to form on some shovels and other tools in there.

Measuring the crankshaft journals & cylinders and comparing them to the specs / wear tolerances in the manual will let you know if you can get away with simply replacing the rods, honing the cylinders, and putting in new rings. Or if you'll have to have the crank journals ground for undersize rods and/or have the cylinders bored for oversize pistons/rings.
 

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Since the rod "grenaded" in there I'll bet there is shrapnel all through the engine. I'm sorry but a full disassemble/cleaning is in order if you don't want to throw good money after bad. The oil screen only filters out the big chunks. It is not hard, actually a learning experience but you will need a cam gear puller. Not hard to make if you have the tools.
 

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I agree with dundee222 ... you'll want to remove the crankshaft to clean it up and measure it. It's not that difficult to remove but will require buying, renting, borrowing, and/or making some puller tools to remove the flywheel & timing gear.

I prefer to use lye (heavy duty oven cleaner) to remove aluminum from crankshafts. I think it takes a little longer than muriatic acid but the fumes aren't quite as bad. Still want to use in a well ventilated area though. And if you do go with acid, be careful where you store it. Years ago I left a bottle of muriatic acid in a shed ... not sure if the cap wasn't tight or if the container wasn't completely sealed, but a few days later I noticed that fumes from the acid had caused some light surface rust to form on some shovels and other tools in there.

Measuring the crankshaft journals & cylinders and comparing them to the specs / wear tolerances in the manual will let you know if you can get away with simply replacing the rods, honing the cylinders, and putting in new rings. Or if you'll have to have the crank journals ground for undersize rods and/or have the cylinders bored for oversize pistons/rings.
Ray,

I second your caution regarding muriatic acid. I was using it for rust removal and left a small amount in a container uncapped........... found out how quickly some nearby hand tools could rust.

Bob
 
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