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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I purchased a Ingersoll 4016 tractor at an estate sale. It has a 3 point hitch and runs good. I put a small bucket on the fron( no dig just carry) and a splitter on the back

I was getting ready to change the fuel line so I crawled under the back and noticed a 3"x4" piece of metal removed from the bottom of the transaxel. I can see up inside the transaxel.

MY question is why would anyone remove a 3"x4" piece of the transaxel from the bottom???????

I plan to remove the transaxel and weld a piece to the bottom so I can put oil in the transaxel.

Anyone have any idea why someone would remove a piece from the transaxel

thanks

John
 

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Ok some minor technical issues here. Lets try this again. Does the missing piece look like it was broken off the housing or does it look like it was cut off? Like mentioned above, it could have been broken off by someone by accident. Take a picture of it
 

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Would it be true to say that the broken bolts could have happened, but most likely not in a 4000 series tractor? I read your write-up (Tom, very nice, if you did it) so in most likelihood would we say that it is more probably that the broken bolts would happen in <= 1985 and that it would be more likely that something hit the bottom of the transaxle and broke it?

I have had maybe three or four 400 series and 1one 600 series with broken bolts, but like the document said, I have not had any 200, 3000 , or 4000 series. Maybe the newer stuff just isn't old enough yet or I haven't had enough to run across them.

-Justin
 

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unclecake said:
Would it be true to say that the broken bolts could have happened, but most likely not in a 4000 series tractor? I read your write-up (Tom, very nice, if you did it) so in most likelihood would we say that it is more probably that the broken bolts would happen in <= 1985 and that it would be more likely that something hit the bottom of the transaxle and broke it?

I have had maybe three or four 400 series and 1one 600 series with broken bolts, but like the document said, I have not had any 200, 3000 , or 4000 series. Maybe the newer stuff just isn't old enough yet or I haven't had enough to run across them.

-Justin
I don't recall anyone reporting such a huge chunk being blown out of their housing, so that's a new one. I have never heard of a 4000 Series tractor suffering the broken bolt malady but as you say, perhaps time plays a part. Let's face it. There are some people out there that are just animals with machinery and no matter how well made something is, they will find a way to wreck it. Even a sledge hammer can end up with large chunks breaking off if it.

Right now, all of this is pointless speculation. The OP needs to drop his trans-axle and remove the cover plate. That will tell him if all four bolts are still where they should be and whether they are still tight. He will also be able to examine the rest of the components to see if a large chunk of the selector cluster broke off, fell to the bottom and burst that large chunk out of the housing. I'm looking forward to some photos and more information because this one is unprecedented as far as I'm concerned.
 

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unclecake said:
My questions came up because of the previous post that it was likely it was the bolts and being a 4000 series tractor...
As far as I know, Ingersoll only changed the high range gear from it having 4 clearance holes for these bolts to having 4 threaded holes. The did not added anything that would mechanically lock the carrier halves together or mechanically lock the two gears to the carrier so that the torsional loading is bearing 100 percent on the mechanical interlocking instead of bearing on the 4 bolts. Had they done that, then I would say that the broken bolt problem would be solved permanently. While what they did do has proven to be fairly effective, I cannot say to an absolute certainty that broken bolts will never happen.

If all a tractor does for 30 years is motor around a flat piece of property and cut grass, the bolt problem will likely never arise if the person operating the tractor treats the tractor with reasonable respect. But when it comes to plowing snow, dirt or gravel along with certain other operations that can place high stress levels on the trans-axle, then all bets are off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hey Guys thanks for all the info. The tractor is a Ingersoll 4016 ID # 14128782-1990

I am trying to attach a few pictures hope it works.

I paln to take the transaxel out some time this summer when things slow down. What is the easiest way to drop the transaxel
Thanks
John

I uploaded to an album and I can't get the photos to this reply
 

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John, that a good size chunk missing out of that housing. That sure isnt getting repaired. Dont even think about weling a patch piece in there either. Welding cast steel is almost impossible. Start looking for a another housing.
 

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johno107 said:
What is the easiest way to drop the transaxel
Thanks
John]
The good news John, is that you don't have to drain the trans-axle. :sidelaugh:

You need to put the FRAME of the tractor on jack-stands, high enough for the rear wheels to clear the ground. \

Remove rear wheels

Remove seat

Remove fenders

Remove seat pedestal

Remove fuel tank.

Remove the two steel hydraulic lines going to the drive motor.

Disconnect the parking brake rod because the actual brake is part of the trans-axle.

You may have a seat switch to deal with when removing the seat.

Slide a FLOOR JACK under the trans-axle and put a bit of pressure on the trans-axle

Remove the remaining LARGE bolts at the front of the trans-axle that secure it to the frame.

Get a helper to hold onto the drive motor of the trans-axle while you lower the floor jack. The trans-axle will try to rotate right off the jack if you do not hold it securely.

The top cover is held by a bunch of small bolts. Once you have moved the trans-axle to a workbench, remove those bolts and open the cover.

Use your serial number to find the correct parts book for your tractor in the Technical Library. That will show you an exploded view of the trans-axle. Go to the Service Manual section and find the books for the 2-speed trans-axle at the bottom of the list.

Between those 2 manuals and the FAQ about the trans-axles, you should be fairly well informed about what you are dealing with. However, we are here to help with any problems that you are unsure of.
 

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While you have the tank out, it would be a good time to replace the hose and filter. Hopefully your tank isnt full of fuel. If it is then just cut the rubber fuel line under the frame and let the fuel drain into another container that is fuel safe. There will be some oil that drains from the two lines going into the drive motor so have something under them when you loosen them or you will have a mess to clean up.
 

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unclecake said:
My questions came up because of the previous post that it was likely it was the bolts and being a 4000 series tractor...
My fault, I completely missed the fact that the OP was referring to a 4XXX.
Read broken housing and immediately ASSUMED bolts. Sorry. :oops:
 

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Looks like it had water in it froze and cracked the piece outward. I don't see any broken bolt marks in the pics. Very interesting!!!!! A loader increases the possibilities of the operator getting into strange situations. :facepalm:
Mad Mackie in CT :mrgreen:
 

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I just reread your initial post and understand that you just put the loader on the tractor. You bought the tractor from an estate sale so there probably is no way to know what and how this happened.
I would look for a complete transaxle assembly, inspect it and replace the four bolts in the differential and install it on the tractor. Preferably get one from an Ingersoll 400 or 4000 series tractor or buy a parts tractor. I am not in favor of parting out late model Ingersolls but this may be your only source.
In 1997 production year Ingersoll changed to the slower ground speed high range gearing. This is a 46 tooth gear and the bolt holes are threaded. The threaded bolt holes made a more secure differential and possibly stopped the broken bolt problem that has plagued the 400 series tractors for years. :facepalm:
Bob MacGregor in CT :lol:
 

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We don't know as of yet what caused this chunk of casting to get blown off the housing but I find it interesting that it happened directly under the Low Range gear. That fact certainly suggest some sort of metal failure inside the trans-axle that led to a chunk of metal getting trapped between the Low Range gear and the housing. We will know better once the trans-axle is opened from the top.

Let's assume for a moment that the High Range gear is in perfect condition. If so, then you could purchase any used trans-axle from Craigslist, Uncle Henry's, e-Bay or privately and then do a thorough rebuild of it. That rebuild is simple. Check the existing axle bushings for play and if they are OK, then just put 4 new oil seals plus an O-ring into the appropriate locations and then put the whole thing back together using the Hi Range gear from your existing axle along with 4 new Grade 8 bolts from the local CAT dealer.

The bulk of this exercise is your own personal labour. Parts costs will not exceed $50.00 for the new stuff. Used trans-axle prices are all over the map. I've seen them sell for $20.00 to $150.00. Shipping is the main issue because of weight. The time to start looking for another axle is now. You can use any 200 or 400 trans-axle from 1971 to 1988 as well as 3000/4000 Series units.


Any questions?
 
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