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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I have an Ingersoll 4018 hydriv that was included when I bought my house. It's been a little temperamental over the past few months, and about a month ago, it just crapped out on me. After checking a few things, I noticed the spark plug was not getting a spark when trying to start it. I ordered a replacement ignition coil kit, and after I installed, it started right up. After about 10 minutes of letting it run and heat up, it died again, and I'm no longer getting a spark on the plug. The coil kit looked brand new and not a refurb, so I can't imagine it would else it could be. Any help would be greatly appreciated
 

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Welcome!

Assuming your tractor is powered by an Onan P218 (or similar Linamar) engine, you might have a faulty ignition switch (or poor connection in the wiring) that is resulting in a loss of power to the coil. Or you might be dealing with a failing ignition module.

You can use a 12V test light or multimeter (set to measure DC volts) to make sure the + side of the coil is receiving battery voltage whenever the key is on. You can also hook up a temporary jumper wire (directly from battery + to coil +) to power the coil independently of the tractor's wiring to see if that makes any difference. Note that you'll have to unhook this wire to stop the engine since it bypasses the key switch. Also be careful not to accidentally hook this jumper to the - side of the coil (that will damage the ignition module).

If the power to the + side of the coil checks out okay and/or the engine still quits while powered with the temporary jumper wire, it's probably an issue with the ignition module. That's located in under the flywheel so it's a bit of a job to replace (have to pull the engine out of the tractor and remove the flywheel). But fortunately, it's easy to test while still in place. Remove both spark plugs and connect a multimeter (again set to measure DC volts) to the coil. Hook the meter's positive lead to the negative (-) coil terminal and the meter's negative lead to a good ground (engine block). Then (with the key on or temporary jumper wire supplying power to the coil), slowly rotate the engine crankshaft by hand while observing the meter reading. A socket on the PTO clutch retainer bolt can be used to rotate the engine. The reading on the meter should switch between battery voltage and 1 to 1.5V every revolution. If the reading doesn't switch back & forth, the module likely needs to be replaced. Note that since your module hasn't completely failed you'll want to run the engine up to temp (when it quits) and perform this test before it cools down again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you for all the information. I do have a volt meter, and will check everything this week, and post an update. Hopefully I don't have to lift the engine, but I'll take it a step at a time
 

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1973 Case 444, 1974 Case 644, 1976 Case 446, 1977 Case 646
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Welcome Sjones55 to the forum. I believe Ray gave you some good info to get and keep your 4018 running fine. The manuals are here on the site as Dealers are posted to help sourcing parts. We all love to see pics of these great machines, so posting some would be great. Keep us all posted on your success with the ignition situation.

Keep the Peace
Harry
 
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