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Put the Berco sweeper to use at the family farm cleaning off driveways of winter sand and gravel. 1/2 throttle works very well. It also works great removing gravel from the grass after pushing snow all winter and thatches the grass as you go.
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Put the Berco sweeper to use at the family farm cleaning off driveways of winter sand and gravel. 1/2 throttle works very well. It also works great removing gravel from the grass after pushing snow all winter and thatches the grass as you go.
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Nice set-up!!! I am working on a hydro sweeper myself. Mine will mount on the 3point in the rear. Wondering how hard it is to steer when the broom is up. Also do you find a need for weight in the back? Thanks
 

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I have an old Sweepster hydraulic driven broom for my 446 and I love it. One day out of the year when I return the gravel to the county after plowing it is the best attachment I own.

Curious what the handle on the left side does?
 

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I'd say that it's Berco's way of locking the sweeper in a fixed forward position,, for angling the head, rotate handle and push/pull for angle.
 

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I have an old Sweepster hydraulic driven broom for my 446 and I love it. One day out of the year when I return the gravel to the county after plowing it is the best attachment I own.

Curious what the handle on the left side does?
That is exactly why I want one, between what gravel I push in driveway and the county does it's quite labor intensive to remove.
I have 4.5 acres with a lot of road frontage.
Been looking for one!

Jim
 

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That is exactly why I want one, between what gravel I push in driveway and the county does it's quite labor intensive to remove.
I have 4.5 acres with a lot of road frontage.
Been looking for one!

Jim
I've read this so many times now, I have to ask ...

It snows here. Not anything like what some of you have to deal with but usually, at least some each season and sometimes, a seasons worth, could be measured in feet. I do recall a few times, when I had to really work my plow rows in the drive, back, to make room for more but just a very few times.

I've read many talk about their County putting gravel on the roads, over winter and needing a way to deal with excess gravel.

Actual gravel? On paved roads?

Here, cinders are sometimes used, sometimes sand, sometimes rock salt but mostly now, its mainly, a brine solution. I'm aware that the brine needs a minimum temp to work and some of you may go long stretches without seeing temps that high ...

I've always had at least some major portion of my drives being gravel and at both places, 100' or more but even if I got a little sloppy and got some in the yard, it wasn't anything a quick raking couldn't handle, once everything was thawed. Even if it was more than that, I'd think I could get it down to a manageable degree, by pushing it back in place with the blade.

Am I just being particularly dense, or is it just that you guys have so much more to deal with, over a longer time?

Regions differ, for lots of reasons. Need, regulations, material availability etc. ...
 

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So, I suspect regions differ quite a bit, typically, Northern Canada,

All of the highways get sanded often in the winter time, includes all streets in the cities as well.. Normal mix includes a bit of salt in the mixture. In that mixture, there is sand, and small pee gravel, up to 1/2" diameter in size. Normally, you'll end up changing your windshield at minimum once a year if you do any sort of traveling, don't know why, but windshield don't like being fed the off rock here and there. If you were fortunate enough, (normally I'm not) not to replace your windshield, after the first year, if you were to clean the outside of the windshield,, the thing feels like it has been through a massive sandstorm. Very gritty feeling.

As far as gravel on the lawns,, let's say you have 20' of lawn space facing a street,, in the spring, you'll have 300-400 ibs of gravel to take off. That's after you've removed it off that lawn, which can be a bit of a chore.

Again, depending on locations in BC, 12-15 ft of snow would be normal say up against the towns/cities that are located beside the mountains, and roughly, 5-6 ft of snow in the Northern interior, say Prince George BC.

A truly abnormal year like this past winter, Prince George received 3 ft of snow, and little old Terrace, in the western side of BC, up against the rain forest, we received roughly 5' throughout the winter. All of that snow,, forms to a very beautiful ice layer on the highways, and without the works crews sanding,, the roads would be extremely treacherous.
 

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The county highways in our area have limestone shoulders anywhere from 2'-3' wide. The soil usually isn't frozen when we get our first snows, so a lot of gravel, and sod gets pushed into our yards along the road when the plow operators push the snow banks further away from the road side. As the winter goes on, with more snow and ice, there is gravel and fines mixed with salt spread on the roads. Some winters we don't see the pavement again until the spring thaw. I'm usually pretty good at scraping a portion of our gravel driveway into the yard with my Case 530 with a snow bucket on the front end loader. Our garage is about 100' from the house, so I have to make a path through the snow to the house, then a path around the house so we can get to our beagle to feed and water her. Then I make a path down to the burn barrel. I end up scraping the high spots off the yard before the ground get frozen. Makes a pretty good mess of the yard each year. I'm hoping that using a snowcaster on the driveway and the paths through the yard will eliminate a lot of that mess, but the road side needs to be raked, or brushed clean each spring. I'd like to get a sweeper for my 444 for this chore. My wife doesn't want me to, because she hires it done for $75.00. The guy that does this does a really good job, so I may forget about the sweeper for a while.
 

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On city streets and maybe some subdivisions, there wouldn't be any, or much of a ditch but County roads, should have good drainage, for road bed, longevity.

1/2" gravel ... I can see how that would be rough on windshields ... The amounts you mention, almost seem enough to want to reclaim?

LFure, Have you tried a pipe on your blade? Really helps with gouging.
 

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On city streets and maybe some subdivisions, there wouldn't be any, or much of a ditch but County roads, should have good drainage, for road bed, longevity.

1/2" gravel ... I can see how that would be rough on windshields ... The amounts you mention, almost seem enough to want to reclaim?

LFure, Have you tried a pipe on your blade? Really helps with gouging.
I used the pipe trick last winter. It would peel back a layer of sod the same size as the pipe on the bucket edge. I cut the pipe off as soon as I saw that. I also added short sections of pipe on the rear blade, and that does the same thing.
 

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The gravel they are referring to comes from the snow plows kicking it out of the shoulders of a paved road. In Michigan, most public snow plows have an underbody scraper blade mounted between the front and rear axles. This is used for most snow fall events until they either get a larger snowstorm or have to deal with drifts. Then, they mount a large front directional plow that only throws snow to one side, usually right. Around here, the front plows don't actually touch the road surface, they just move the bulk of the snow to the side while the underbody plow gets the rest. Many counties also have wing plows mounted on their trucks and graders that allow them to clear the lane and shoulder in one pass.

The underbody scraper blade on a truck does not have the same adjustibility as a grader does. They can rotate around in the horizontal plane and the angle of attack of the blade can be adjusted. You can't usually change the tilt of the blades with respect to horizontal. So, the tilt of the blade is determined by the crown of the road. When you place material in your driveway right next to the road and at a higher elevation than the adjacent surface, the scraper blade can catch that material and send it flying back into your driveway or grass.

My neighbor gets mad every spring because the plow peals back some grass that he has let grow over the top of the pavement. If you simply keep the stuff trimmed back and sloped away from the road, the scraper won't hit it and you don't wind up with a mess in the spring. He won't listen and expects that somehow the drivers should be able to see his grass under a foot of snow in the dark.

My boys had to rake a bunch of gravel out of their grandfathers yard this spring as his neighbor put in a new gravel driveway and left the surface too high next to the road.

The sand they put on the road for traction has pretty small particles in it, like 3/16". This stuff doesn't pile up to any great amount. It takes several years before the accumulation of this sand becomes noticeable.
 

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On city streets and maybe some subdivisions, there wouldn't be any, or much of a ditch but County roads, should have good drainage, for road bed, longevity.

1/2" gravel ... I can see how that would be rough on windshields ... The amounts you mention, almost seem enough to want to reclaim?

LFure, Have you tried a pipe on your blade? Really helps with gouging.
Yes, when the municipal guys cleanup the streets in the spring, that's recovered. Now, if they had half a thought, they would wait till all the snows gone off the lawns, that way, the stuff they put on the lawns would be recovered as well. Instead, they cleanup at the earliest opportunity,, and then, there's a bunch of whining and sniveling from the public works because a lot of home owners just push that dirt and gravel back into the streets, and then, they leave it like that. At times,, you've got to wonder about this yearly process. Over here, the plows wing everything off the roads onto everyone's lawns. It's not a case where they pick it up and get rid of it some wheres,, the cheaper way is to just wing it off the streets, onto the lawns, so you sort of know what the stuff comes from in the first place,,
 

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I used the pipe trick last winter. It would peel back a layer of sod the same size as the pipe on the bucket edge. I cut the pipe off as soon as I saw that. I also added short sections of pipe on the rear blade, and that does the same thing.
Hmmm. Works great for me.

I checked a soils map of Wisconsin. The Leslie area, shows Sandy and Silty Loams. Great for growing stuff but not known for high strength.

A bigger pipe diameter? Softening the edge, has to make a difference. Other than extremely fragile soils and turf, it should float right across it.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
The long handle allows the operator to angle the sweeper left / right or straight on. Berco makes a few models of sweepers and this model is designed for certain horizontal shaft garden tractors, Ingersoll being one of them. The mule / lift bracket is specific to Ingersoll 3000/4000 series. Looks similar to a snowblower mule bracket but with slots to slide the various Berco attachments into it. The same bracket works with the Berco 2-stage snowblower.
 

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Hmmm. Works great for me.

I checked a soils map of Wisconsin. The Leslie area, shows Sandy and Silty Loams. Great for growing stuff but not known for high strength.

A bigger pipe diameter? Softening the edge, has to make a difference. Other than extremely fragile soils and turf, it should float right across it.
The soil here is pretty soft. It doesn't take long to dig a 16" post hole down about three feet. If you find a rock in the soil it was put there by someone. Like an old building foundation. In one area of my property you find yellow sand about 6'-8' down. Makes me think that the valley near by was a lake several million years ago. I was told that the deep top soil in this area was blown in by a wind storm millions of years ago. That must have been a pretty intense storm to blow that much dirt.
 
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