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I was going to add this onto my ongoing 7020 thread, but I feel it deserves it's own independent thread, easily accessible by anyone rebuilding one of these in the future.

Just as a quick intro, I bought a Ingy 7020 about 6 months ago now. It shows low hours, only about 300 hours at this time, but I suspect the original owner of the tractor did not understand the concept of greasing equipment. Which of course caused some wear in various places, like the spindle bushings and axle pivot on the front end. Also, when I acquired the tractor, it was stuck in 4wd, I could not get it into 2wd, and because of this was forced to use low range all the time, as most of you know, you cannot run the 7020 in high range with the 4wd engaged.

Now for the repairs. I pulled the front differential out of the machine and took it apart. My assumption after researching the Hilliard differentials, was that the armature plate inside had become warped or permanently magnetized, not allowing the differential to disengage. What I found was worse than that. The sprague carrier, a plastic "Cage" inside the differential that holds many steel rollers, had literally shattered into 50+ pieces. While this was somewhat surprising, I had been prepared for it. Before I had even removed the differential from the machine I had ordered a complete kit to repair the differential including the sprague carrier (upgraded to a machined aluminum piece, new rollers and a new armature plate.

After I replaced the internal parts the differential was ready to be reinstalled. But my conscience got the better of me and I decided I'd better replace the seals in the differential while I had it apart. Even though with the way the differential is designed, none of the old seals had to be touched when disassembling the differential. Fast forward a few days, seal kit is in and I get the old ones swapped out. Differential is now reassembled, and I move on to the axle itself.

Ok for the purposes of clarity, we'll call the solid steel "axle" that carries the weight of the front end simply as the
axle" and the actual drive axles in the front end we will call "CV axles". The axle was quite fun to remove. My recommendation would be to drop the pan for the 4wd, I didn't do this, while I can say it CAN be done with it in place, it would make your life a lot easier if you removed it. It took me HOURS to turn off the large nut on the pivot pin/bolt. I ended up buggering the threads on it, had to clean them with a thread file, and replaced the castle nut. But I did get it off eventually.
Now, the biggest issue with the axle itself was one of the bronze bushings had broken at the flange. These bushings have an approx. 0.100" flange on the top of them that seats against the axle itself. There is a total of 4 of these bushings on the axle, 2 for each spindle. The other 3 were in good shape but did show some minor signs of wear. Honestly, they could have been kept in service for awhile yet, but I didn't see the point of replacing just the one. I figured I might as well replace the 4 and be done with it. I priced them at a couple of our sponsors websites, they were around $20 each I believe. I decided to buy a length of suitable bronze stock from McMaster-Carr and machine new ones out on my lathe myself. Not an option for everyone but it basically cut the price of the bushings in half, along with that I was able to get my McMaster order in about 2 days, vs. the couple weeks it would take to get anything from a dealer in the US. The width of the flange on the bushings is not critical. You can simply use shims in place of the factory's quite thick washers. I made the flange a little thicker than stock seemed to be, remember my bushings did have some wear to them as is, I then replaced the thick washers as I said, with some thinner steel shims. I did make a little oopsie on 2 of the bushings, they weren't loose in the bore of the axle but they weren't as tight as I'd like either. I used retaining compound to keep them in place.

Moving on to the actual axle pivot now. There was SOME play, not an outrageous amount, but some. It was most noticeable with the axle in the tractor, you could move the axle back and forth, think froward and backward in reference to the machine itself if you grabbed the end of the axle at the spindle. I came up with 2 solutions to fix this, the first was to replace what I thought was an OEM steel bushing in the axle pivot. The other we'll get into a bit later.
So I took the axle and tossed it on my bench. As I said, it looked to me like there was some sort of steel bushing welded into place in the axle. I did some exploring with an angle grinder and a really big hammer, only to find out that this axle has NO bushing in it at all, and whats welded in place on either side is just a large washer. Well at this point I was backed up against a wall, I HAD to fix my mess at the very least, might as well fix the whole thing right. I decided to weld a 1 1/4" chunk of steel rod in the bore to act as a guide, since the bore wasn't THAT wore I was able to get it in there where I feel it was pretty bang on. Prior to welding it in I had chucked it up in the lathe and centre drilled the rod in preparation for the next step. Now this is the, somewhat sketchy way of doing things I'll admit, and after I'll explain the right way lol. Anyway, like I said, I had centre drilled the rod so that I could throw the axle on my drill press table, level it up, and drill out the pivot with a 1.5" annular cutter. It drilled straight and true all the way through and I was satisfied with the results. Remember, this is JUST an axle pivot that moves very little. I then made a steel sleeve to drop down from 1.5" to 1.25" using some bushing stock I had. Re created the washers from the same bushing stock and welded it back together. The bushing stock has an ID of 1.5" so in the future the washers would not need to be cut off, the sleeve should be able to be just pressed out.
Now, as promised, I will simply state that the "correct" way to do this would be to set the axle up on a milling machine and bore the pivot out with a boring head. I don't own a mill, and I didn't feel like taking it to a machine shop. I felt that the way I did it, was the best way given my circumstances, and maybe that's what is the correct way?

So axle pivot is done, spindle bushings are done, differential is repaired, all that's left is to throw a couple new wheel bearings in the thing. When I tore the front end apart earlier, I had taken the time to inspect the bearings, one side looked good, the other side was a little questionable and was missing one of the grease seals. I took the numbers off the bearings and went searching. I was able to find the outer race, and the bearing cone WITH the grease seal on it on eBay NOS out of Quebec for about $10/ cone+seal and $5/ outer race. Guy only had 2 of each but that was all I needed anyway.
I packed them with fresh grease, installed them into the spindles as I put the front end back together.
I made sure to check all boots on the CV axles as well, as everyone knows keeping those boots from getting ripped or cracked is super important, CV axles won't live long if contaminants are allowed in and the grease comes out. Figured this out long ago on ATV's.

Oh yeah, remember I mentioned earlier about my 2nd fix for the slop in the pivot? Well, with my axle re-installed my play was at about zero, or it was zero. But I wanted to make sure the wear blocks on the frame were right up against the axle. That way any twisting force on the front axle should be all but eliminated. I ordered some AA size shims from McMaster-Carr in 0.0300" thickness. I stuck the shims over the bolts in between the wear block and the frame, 1 shim for each bolt, so 2 on each block. It took about 1 shim thick on each block to get it where I wanted it. Depending on how accurate you were with your pivot in the first place you might require more or less shims on certain blocks.

Well, now that the song and dance is over, let's talk part numbers and whatnot, that's what you're REALLY here for, right?

The Hilliard differential in the 7020 shares A LOT in common with the differential out of a 2003 Polaris Sportsman 600 Twin 4x4. There is another models also, I believe 2004 and 2005 are the same, but I just made sure to order parts for the 2003 model. I do not know for sure if the differential is 100% the same, but everything I replaced in the diff the parts were for that model. So the sprague carrier, armature place, and all the seals were for that model.

Polaris OEM Parts
Armature Plate - 3233924
Sprague Carrier - 3233949
Rollers - 3233957
Seal Kit - 3233956
Approx cost from Polaris would be around $480.

A little more research turned up Deere part numbers for the same parts. One or more of their Gator's used the same differential, or similar enough anyway.

From JD
Sprague Carrier w/armature plate- MIA10667
Roller Kit - MIA10666
Seal Kit - MIA10654
Approx cost from JD would be around $188.

These OEM parts are EXACTLY the same as what is in the Ingersoll Hilliard diff from the factory, so that means they are no stronger. I opted to purchase an aftermarket kit containing a aluminum carrier, instead of plastic.
This is the kit I used...
https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B07QX5KQS5/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Cost is about $123 USD, no seal kit with it, used All Balls P/N 25-2059-5, which cost an additional 16 bucks US.
Total cost of aftermarket upgrade: ~$150

The spindle bushings are 1.5" OD x 1.5" L (including flange) x 1.25" ID. Flange is 2" x .100" 4 are required. I used 2" OD x 1.25" ID 932 bearing bronze to make mine. The ID is undersized to it can be finish bored.

Shims on the spindle, I purchased 1.25" ID x 1.75" OD 0.134" thick which matched factory, I also bought them in .1250", .0600", and 0.0300" to use as needed to get everything nice and tight. These shims are used on both the top and bottom.

The pivot, about 1.25" ID, I just went by feel with the pivot bolt so don't have an accurate ID measurement. Thickness has to be around 2" or just under to fit in the frame. The pivot bolt is quite hard and doesn't seem to wear very much on these 7020's, the design is different than the older Case loaders.

Differential oil I used Shell tractor hydraulic/trans fluid.

Front wheel bearings. Each side requires 2 cups and 2 cones, 2 seals. I bought the cones with the seals they worked fine but were slightly different in appearance to the OEM ingersoll seals. If you wish to purchase OEM Ingersoll seals you can do so, then use the part number for just the cone itself, not cone+seal.

I used genuine Timken bearings. Which as far as I know are the same as OEM used.
LM48548 (Just Cone)
LM48500 (Cone w/ Seal)
LM48510 (Cup/Race)

One previous mod I'll just briefly mention, I installed a remote grease fitting onto the axle pivot. As you know the grille has to be removed to reach the fitting, so I installed a line from the pivot up to the hood/front end support, easily accessible when you raise the hood. I think this is a MUST DO mod to these tractors, a grease fitting you can't easily access is all but useless as far as I'm concerned. When I installed this remote fitting I had to remove the dust cover on the fitting, which tells me when I greased it, it was likely the first time since it left the factory in 2003.

Pictures to follow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
More pictures...
 

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Excellent write up on the Hilliard differential!

Mac102004, Not that I know much about your drive system, but the post seems quite detailed, including replacement of parts. Since this is the first post I've seen of this, Can you perhaps let me know,

The attached manual below, I'm assuming this is what you are referencing, a how to get into a re and re of this differential? If you could confirm this, I'd like to take your first couple of posts, and add those under the service manuals section. Perhaps maybe there aren't too many questions at this point in time, but going forward, I see this being an added resource for others that may follow you in the next years to come. Excellence post and write up, we should add to the below section,

Your comments?

https://manuals.casecoltingersoll.c...fferential-for-On-Demand-Four-Wheel-Drive.pdf
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yep that is the drive unit in the 7020. There isn’t much out there for useful parts diagrams or anything, that does show some specs and basic information though.


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I've zero experience on the tractor and very intrigued by your good work. Obviously, many hours of thought, research, disassembly, and a great repair to upgrade robustness and serviceability. I particularly like your stellar welding and am curious what rod you used....The axle appears to be a steel grade, and not cast like our small tractors....so, welding the bushing on the pivot, was it 7018? Beautiful bead, and little spatter.....Great work!:clap:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I've zero experience on the tractor and very intrigued by your good work. Obviously, many hours of thought, research, disassembly, and a great repair to upgrade robustness and serviceability. I particularly like your stellar welding and am curious what rod you used....The axle appears to be a steel grade, and not cast like our small tractors....so, welding the bushing on the pivot, was it 7018? Beautiful bead, and little spatter.....Great work!:clap:
The axle appears to be cut (plasma? water jet? ) from 1.75" thick steel. Welded it with 7018 rod. To be honest I took a pic of the best part of the weld lol

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Wasn't sure on the axle template cutting procedure but it's clearly fabricated which actually makes it easier to repair, in my opinion, vs cast. I'm sure you're selling yourself short on your welding skills....Your profile states you're a dairy farmer, and I have encountered and known many farmers who weld better than many non-farmers, out of necessity of having to repair one's own farm equipment.....Great job, once again!
 
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