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I finally found a snowcaster made for my Ingersoll made Massey - the equivalent of a 3016. I'm thinking of disassembling it to sandblast and repaint but would like to study a parts manual first to see what to expect. I looked in the parts manuals section and found a place holder for the SB48 attachment which I think is basically what I have. Can any of you offer some advise on how to approach the tear down, what to look for, what not to do, etc.?
 

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There is really no difference between the SB series and the last of the older letter series when it comes to construction. The blowers are extremely simple. Once you start wrenching on the one you have, you will find it easy to tear down. Start by removing the chain and then go from there with either the jackshaft or the auger.
 

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One fine point on the later model casters with plain bearing is that you need a very slim wrench to get in between the auger end and the housing. There is a hex on the bearing stub shaft which you must hold to untorque the mounting bolt.

I recallit is a 3/4" ... grind thin any old POS wrench, or a good old fashioned tappet wrench if you have one that large.

Getting the bearings out of the auger is simple ... a 5 ft dowel from the opposing end will poke them out.

Don't bother to try to pull the driveshaft bearings ... a high speed cutoff tool is best.

Pulley can be a bear to get off the driveshaft, but your machine should have the clearance holes so you can get the whole driveshaft assembly to a bench where it can be pressed off after the spirol pins are removed ... caution that pulley is not cheap.

Else ... pretty simple mechanicals as Hydriv states.

Brian
 

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Willowmaster said:
Can any of you offer some advise on how to approach the tear down, what to look for, what not to do, etc.?
It's a pretty simple piece of machinery, most of it is obvious but I did get one nasty surprise: Look for rust between the bottom of the bucket and the solid piece it is welded to at the bottom. When I did mine I found that corrosion had started in the places where they overlapped but were not welded - as if water had creeped into the unpainted area between the two surfaces and rust had worked its way out from the middle. I started grinding until I hit clean metal and actually went all the way through in 2 small places. I welded that up and before I painted, I used auto body caulk to totally seal that area and a few others I found around the bucket. This was not evident until I started grinding, it appeared to be only surface rust and pitting. So look very carefully.
 
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