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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking to build a Jib boom (cherry picker, engine lift, reach arm) for my Case 646. Built a cross bar like the factory built fork lift bar. I want to use this as a universal mount. Built a Jib boom to bolt to it but when it comes back level, it is too sloppy.
I use the loader for a lot of lifting of my old Hit & Miss engines and need a pole with hook on the end instead of trying to loop a chain over the bucket.

Anyone have any pictures of a Jib they built for theirs?
 

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Sounds like an interesting project.... How long do you intend to reach out beyond, say, the original front cutting edge of the bucket ? We have one of those forklift booms we put on the skidder at the shop, and that thing really gets heavy all by itself even when its collapsed. When I think of perhaps how my 644 would handle such a thing, I'm thinking I wouldnt want to be much more than a foot past the original cutting edge line or I wouldnt be able to lift all that much. Having a short pole there over a bucket though sure would give a guy a lot of room to see and pinpoint locate the load though.

Maybe you can get some ideas from this little luffing boom being put together down the road from me:

http://www.data-cut.com/images/31000-1.jpg - 5 blocks away.
http://www.data-cut.com/images/31000-2.jpg - 3-4 miles away.

Those are photos of the new 31000 series cranes being built here at Manitowoc Crane. The main lower boom in the photo is about half length of maximum, and I am told that the luffer can go another section or two. Not sure if they will have room in the yard to set it up at full length as they have a LOT of cranes underway right now.

The main booms 4 base legs are 12.75" Diameter and 1.75" wall thickness. The operators cab is larger than my kitchen.... A decent comparison as I have been told it does contain a microwave and refridgerator.

The "sister" crane to this one is already built and can be seen just in front and to the right of the erected one in that first photo. As of today, they have the sister erected with a much longer main boom and a short luffer, and it shockingly stands every bit as tall as the one in the first photo. If it stops raining up this way, I want to get some more distant photos. I was out about 10 miles the other day without my camera.... the thing looks taller the farther you get away from it !

You can find some closeups of boom segments in this forum... you know, for some ideas on your jib ! LOL !
http://www.bouwmachineforum.nl/forum/vi ... hp?t=13902
 

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Be careful, with those cranes in the neighborhood you may wake up one morning and find that some of your Cases have been spirited away despite the 20 foot barbed/razor wire fence you erected to protect them. :sidelaugh:
 

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Gregad511 said:
Anyone have any pictures of a Jib they built for theirs?
I have forks on my loader that I use frequently for all kinds of moving activities. By simply making a hole in the tip of one of the forks you can attach a short length of chain with a hook and use the fork as a boom. This may not do the job if you need a lot of lift height but I think making a boom for your setup to provide more lift height would be quite easy. I would probably use some 2" x 1/8" square tube and bolt it vertically to the forks frame. If you want to make it more flexible you could have a second section of tubing that fits inside the main section of tubing so that the length could be adjusted. You can also stiffen the boom by welding some rods with standoffs to the tubing. The length of the boom will be dictated by the desired lift capacity and height. I would caution you that stability decreases rapidly as the lift height increases so be careful particularly if you're using it on uneven terrain. Adding substantial weight to the rear end will give you a surprising amount of lift capacity--I have over 700 lbs of weight between wheel weights and a backhoe and can lift about 1,000 lbs with the forks.
 

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That setup looks pretty nice..... What do you figure you can lift out there in pounds ?

I realize its not all about being able to lift a lot. Something like that can be real handy for positioning even the small stuff you'd rather not have to grab a neighbor or throw a back out on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I just used it to lift a 375lb small engine with no problem except blew front tire out. Ouch I guess that old 30 year old rubber don't last forever.

Built this because I wanted to be able to reach at least half the way into my pickup bed. 4 feet. My bucket seemed sort of weak to use a bucket mounted one and not long enough to reach into bed very far. Designed it sort of like a 3 point mount. I did build a universal mount something like the fork lift attachment sold by dealers. I can bolt the jib and other future ideas to that.
 

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So how much ballast did you need to be able to pick up 375# four foot out?
How high were you able to lift it?
I know on my skid steer with the forks I can put a trailer ball on the tip and
if I hang a chain off it I can't lift near what I can with the bucket.
On an engine hoist you lose 25% lift capacity for every six to eight inches of
length you add but your saying you didn't lose much at all if any.
It does look great and I do like your adapter mount. :thumbsup:

 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I am guessing I have around 200 lbs of weight on the back of the tractor. It was there when I bought it. Lifting the 375# (Again I am guessing as I never really weighed the engine either but have been told they weigh that) I only lifted it high enough to pull it out of the back of my pickup and lower it to a cart. Slow and easy. Yes I did feel the lift on the back end.

By saying no problem, I am saying, nothing broke and I felt confident that the lift was able to handle the load.

Most of my lifting is going to be lighter than 375# But too much for my old body to lift anymore.

So guys who know the physics, What should I be comfortable lifting weight wise, to and from 4 feet above ground level?
 

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Gregad511 said:
So guys who know the physics, What should I be comfortable lifting weight wise, to and from 4 feet above ground level?
As long as you are on level ground and don't go much higher than 4 feet you should be able to lift as much as you can without lifting the rear wheels. I've lifted a 1000 lb pallet with the forks. The problem is usually having enough traction to move anywhere. :sidelaugh:
 

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Your loader arms actually travel in an arc. Your greatest lifting capacity begins with loader in the fully down position. The capacity drops off at about the half-way point and then increases as the end of the loader arms move past the mid-point of the circle and start coming back toward the Operator. All of this is good if you are on hard, flat ground with your wheels (front and back) in perfect alignment with one another.

If you turn the wheels very gradually while staying on perfectly flat, hard ground......then the tractor will stay stable even with the load in the air. Where you get into trouble is when you turn the front wheels hard to the left or right or you traverse uneven ground while the load is carried high. Keeping the load close to the ground is always a wise move. Adding triple cast iron wheel weights along with loading the tires with beet juice plus having six hundred pounds of counterweight close to the back of the tractor will vastly improve stability, safety and lift capacity.
 
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