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So, you haven't checked the number one thing you should: voltage at the battery when the tractor is running. A good charging system should be able to put around 14V DC on the battery, no matter what. If the meter doesn't show a steady voltage around 14V DC you have a problem with the charging system. If the voltage is steady and around 14V DC, the battery is the problem.

If the total load from the consumers (lights, battery) is too high for the charging system, the voltage seen at the battery terminals while the tractor is running will be much lower than 14V DC. Anything that looks like 12.x V DC is telling you there's a problem. You can then eliminate the lights and see if the charging voltage is fine; if so, the new lights are you problem.

You can do a lot of troubleshooting without an clamp amp meter.

However, most multimeter have a 10A measuring function too. Just pull the lights out of the circuit and put the multimeter in series (between the lights and cable that comes from L at the switch) and measure the draw of the lights. That if you were really curious about the amp draw of the lights.
 

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If, while your tractor is running, the voltage on the battery is below 13.8V or more than 14.3V your charging system isn't right. Can you confirm the voltage you measured on the battery while the tractor is idling? Doesn't matter cold or warm engine.
 
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