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You have two choices.

Contact one of our resident Ingersoll dealers and order the kit. Look in the FAQ's for their addresses.

OR

Dismantle the valves and take the body and spools to a local hydraulics shop so they can match up the rings.

Then... consult the Service Manual section of the Library for the tutorial on valve repair.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Has anyone successfully resealed there TCV with a napa oring kit? I have mine apart right now and all of the inlet/outlet orings are matching up nicely, except for 1. The one with the 90 degree off the TCV seems to have a rectangular or even a 45 degree on one side. I have found a standard round oring that seems to match up nicely but not sure if it will work. On the actual valves themselves the orings are normal round but my new rings in my kit are a couple thousanths smaller in width but diameter is exact. Also on a side note where would I plumb another cylinder in to this system?
 

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The O-ring issue.

If you go to Google and ask "types of O-rings" you will get 34 million 300 thousand hits.

Here is just one.

www.ftir.com/html/o-ring_types.html

As you can see by the chart, O-rings are made from several types of material and each material has strengths and weaknesses. I have no idea what material is used to make the O-rings found in a NAPA kit. This is why I suggested that you take this issue to a hydraulics shop. They will not only have O-rings that are made from the correct material but they should have O-rings that are not a perfect O. Now. if you like to put things together and then take them apart and then put them back together and take then apart, any O-ring will do. Today... mechanics are finding out that certain parts that worked fine with pure gasoline are now failing due to alcohol being added to gasoline. Hydraulics shops make their living by installing the best quality seals that hold up in the world of today.

As for the cylinder question.... what is this cylinder expected to do?
 

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Is this triangular o-ring on an adapter fitting? They tend to flatten out where they seal over time. I just did one a couple weeks ago. The book calls for a couple $7-9 tri-rings and I used a couple $0.50 quad rings from a hydraulic supply house for the spools. Make sure the spools are in good shape and fit tightly in the body as the circuts seal by tight tolerances. The hydraulic fittings use a standard round cord buna o-ring.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
1031d said:
Is this triangular o-ring on an adapter fitting? They tend to flatten out where they seal over time. I just did one a couple weeks ago. The book calls for a couple $7-9 tri-rings and I used a couple $0.50 quad rings from a hydraulic supply house for the spools. Make sure the spools are in good shape and fit tightly in the body as the circuts seal by tight tolerances. The hydraulic fittings use a standard round cord buna o-ring.
What about the spool orings? where you able to find an exact match?
 

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aaron said:
I want to eventually build a three point and will need to plumb a cylinder for that.
Hydriv said:
As for the cylinder question.... what is this cylinder expected to do?
The cylinder for an OEM 3 point hitch is Tee'd into the Lift Valve that operates the mid-lift cylinder. When you pull down on the Lift Lever, both cylinders will raise any load attached. If you want INDEPENDENT operation, then you add a SELECTOR VALVE with 3 ports on it. If you put the selector valve in position A, the Lift Lever will cause the 3 pt hitch to work up and down and the mid lift cylinder will stay where it was when you switched the selector valve to position A.

If you have a tiller mounted to the 3 pt hitch and it is in the air, you can put the selector valve in position B. The tiller will stay in the air providing the hitch cylinder does not leak down on its own but now, the Lift Lever will make the mid-lift cylinder extend or retract while not affecting the 3 pt in any way.

Any questions.
 

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Hydriv said:
aaron said:
I want to eventually build a three point and will need to plumb a cylinder for that.
aaron said:
As for the cylinder question.... what is this cylinder expected to do?
The cylinder for an OEM 3 point hitch is Tee'd into the Lift Valve that operates the mid-lift cylinder. When you pull down on the Lift Lever, both cylinders will raise any load attached. If you want INDEPENDENT operation, then you add a SELECTOR VALVE with 3 ports on it. If you put the selector valve in position A, the Lift Lever will cause the 3 pt hitch to work up and down and the mid lift cylinder will stay where it was when you switched the selector valve to position A.

If you have a tiller mounted to the 3 pt hitch and it is in the air, you can put the selector valve in position B. The tiller will stay in the air providing the hitch cylinder does not leak down on its own but now, the Lift Lever will make the mid-lift cylinder extend or retract while not affecting the 3 pt in any way.

Any questions.
:headscratcher: Yes. :sidelaugh:

Would this be able to put down pressure on the three point as well ?

:crazy: :canada:
 

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Absolutely.

You would have all functions available for both cylinders.. Up, Down, Float, Down pressure remain. All you are doing with the selector valve is choosing which cylinder will receive the oil flow. The other cylinder is then hydraulically locked in position providing the seals on the piston and the cylinder walls do not allow oil to bypass from one side of the piston to the other.
 

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aaron said:
What about the spool orings? where you able to find an exact match?
mine had tri-rings in the housing for the spools and I just substituted quad rings as they are the same price from my supplier. The tri-rings seal oil in but let dirt in. Quad rings seal on both sides. Most things like this in the ag world have an o-ring or tri-ring to seal the oil and a secondary lip seal to wipe the dirt off the shaft. This makes a lot of sense for use under the tractor as its usually pretty dirty down there.
 

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I think it important that I add the following to this discussion.

Case did not make hydraulic components. They sourced them from every hydraulics manufacturer out there. Case used several different styles of travel/lift valves over the years. Secondly, used tractors may have travel valves in them that came from a different year and model. Therefore, the parts manual may not help you with O-rings. However, a qualified hydraulics repair shop can help because they have the expertise to identify which O-ring type is in the valve they are looking at. And they know what O-ring can be substituted safely.

This is a free service at the counter if you walk in with the valve dismantled and say "I need new O-rings for this valve. What do you have that will work?" Does it get any better than that? Not in my world it doesn't.
 

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Something else to try if a hydraulics service center is far away is go to an ag repair shop that works on equipment too as most of them make hoses and have a wide variety of fittings and rings in stock. We have a father/son repair shop on town that has a whole room of nothing but hydraulic hose, fittings, rings, pumps, etc and at decent prices too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I got it all resealed with some qaud rings for the spools and my oring kit matched nicely for most of the rest of them we will see how it all works in a day or 2 when I fire it up.
 
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