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Sure, why not? They have a rating that far exceeds the lifting capabilities of your loader. They attach and remove quicker than you could mount OEM forks and they are easily adjusted for different pallet widths. Most of all, they are inexpensive. You do realize that they are not solid steel but are box tubing. That's a good thing because it helps keep the weight down. I doubt that your pallets will weigh more than 400 lbs unless you have really wet wood on them or you are using pallets larger than 4 X 4.
 

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The only pair of those forks that I've seen were on a small skid steer and they had the cutting edge and bucket tweaked where they were attached. I see them listed everywhere and I'm sure they sell lots of them and if you don't exceed the ratings they're probably fine but that's easier said than done.
Take a look at these forks for a Toro Dingo sized machine. The outfit in KC told me they would sell just the forks for $150. Building a carriage for the 600 series would be pretty easy and while I haven't done it it's on my list. My skid steer always has the forks on it and about the only time I swap to the bucket is for snow removal.

http://www.budgetforklift.com/micro-pallet-forks.html
http://www.equipmentland.com/products/a ... ndex.shtml
 

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Rich, The company that I work for sells that type of fork. I refer to them as "bucket benders" (though not in front of my boss). If used carefully they are a great tool. They do apply a lot of leverage to the edge of the bucket. For the best results keep them out next to the sides where there is the most strength. It is also a little difficult to see the tips to go into a pallet because the bucket is in the way. I agree with cp7 that a quik coupler type would be much handier though the cost would be higher. The Dingo style quick attach would be a great setup. It is the standard on all of those small track machines so there are a lot of options. Gregg
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you all for the posts. In my case it would be pretty limited, careful use, so it appears I could get by.
Gregg if I go for a pair I'll get in touch and try to hook up with you across the Sound, points north on your routes. Lunch or coffee too. :thumbsup:
Thank you.
:222: :446: Best Regards, Rich
 

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Rich, I was asked last week if I wanted to add Long Island to my territory again so I may be visiting. The eastern end of the island is nice and I enjoy the ferry rides (beautiful in the summer) but hate the ride through NYC.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Nutcase446 said:
Rich, I was asked last week if I wanted to add Long Island to my territory again so I may be visiting. The eastern end of the island is nice and I enjoy the ferry rides (beautiful in the summer) but hate the ride through NYC.
Gregg: Your always welcome to stop by the place if Long Island is added. The ferry ride is enjoyable and the food is actually good. Its come along way. I go to Virginia on a regular basis. Where do I always hit traffic on the way back, the belt parkway!!! Way down I go through in wee hours before the city folks wake up! :sidelaugh: :sidelaugh: :sidelaugh:
:222: :446: Best Regards, Rich
 

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InTroubleAlltheTime said:
Thank you all for the posts. In my case it would be pretty limited, careful use, so it appears I could get by.
Gregg if I go for a pair I'll get in touch and try to hook up with you across the Sound, points north on your routes. Lunch or coffee too. :thumbsup:
Thank you.
:222: :446: Best Regards, Rich
Rich,
Keep in mind that the Case bucket likely uses 1/8" steel for all the large areas and derives its strength from being bent into shape with sides welded onto it. The main strength comes from the cutting edge and if your edge is badly worn, then you should consider cutting it off and welding a new edge on. You might want to think about using a slightly stronger edge but you don't want to overdo that either. The edge is a like a knife blade and thinner, sharper knife blades take less effort to cut than thicker, blunter knives do.

However..............another consideration in the equation is this. No plain edge bucket will ever perform as well as a toothed bucket will. The difference is night and day. So if you intend to make up a "tooth bar" to bolt/unbolt from your bucket, then you need to factor that into your decision about which cutting edge to use. If I was going to replace the cutting edge on a 600, then I would choose one that was meant for and 1840 or 1845 Case skid steer loader because it would beef up the leading edge of the bucket dramatically and there would be no problem getting teeth to make up my own tooth bar.

Going with the beefier edge would be good for both the tooth bar application as well as those "bucket bender" forks that Gregg was talking about.
 

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http://www.alzwelding.com/product.html

They'll look just as good on a red tractor and probably work better. He always advertises that he's running a sale so I wouldn't worry about the dates if it was me and I'd hold him to a better price.

Brinly also made a pair that attached to the three point adapter. It's a real simple design and could be done with the forks I mentioned earlier.

 

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My thoughts are as follows:

1. Those forks are a lot of money for what they are.

2. Sooner or later you will damage the bucket.

3. Moving firewood on a pallet is a tricky proposition--I've tried it. In my opinion the only productive way to do it would be with some purpose made "pallets" that have sides to contain the wood.

4. Pallet forks are the most useful attachment I own and I have dedicated one loader to their full time use.

5. The quick attach system, though more expensive, opens up a lot of options for using the loader--particularly if you like to fabricate attachments. One idea floating around in my head is to build a log splitter to fit on the loader so I could split very large logs from the seat of the loader.

6. Forks can also be used as a kind of quick attach system if you design the attachment with some tubes that will slide over the forks and can be locked in place.

7. The best idea I've run across for moving wood utilizes the 3 pt. hitch. It consists of an "A" frame with a hitch receiver and wood bins with a tube that fits into the hitch receiver. The bins are made of steel and have fixed sides so the wood can be stacked and will stay in place. The virtue of this arrangement is that you can have multiple bins loaded and stored in a convenient spot then just back up with the 3 pt and pick them up to move them close to the point of use as needed. You should be able to handle at least a 600 lb load with this arrangement and the weight is carried on the rear axle where it will be more stable.
 
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