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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
got a TCV with lift circuit from ebay... the USPS was nice enough to use the package for soccer or something, so the cover on the end of the lift circuit is broken.


1.Does this seal in hydraulic fluid or is it just a dust cover?
2.Can I fix it with JB Weld, or should I try to find a replacement?

Thanks!!
 

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Do you see the two opposing hex bolts on that cover?

Carefully remove them. It might be best to lay an old towel on a clean bench surface and then set this valve onto it while dismantling.

Each hex bolt is actually hollowed out inside to hold a coil spring that pushes on a small ball bearing. I don't want you to lose your balls while doing this so that's why I suggest the towel. With the two hex bolts, springs and balls removed, you can then undo the two Phillips fillister-head screws that retain the cap to the valve body.


This unit is actually on the lift spool, not the travel spool. This is what gives you "float position" on the lift spool. The two spring-loaded balls engage a "detent" on a rod that is screwed into the end of the lift spool. When you push your lift lever all the way up, you engage "float" and that allows your snowcaster or utility blade to float up and down with no interference from the tractor's hydraulics. There is no fluid in this area. It is supposed to be dead dry and rust free.

You can try to repair it with JB weld but in order for it to work properly, it must be on the main body in alignment with the body. Secondly, you do not want moisture to get inside either. When this happens, everything rusts up and you have problems working the lift. I think that I would opt to just replace that "dunce cap" , as some people call it. Brian may be able to source a new one for you if no one steps up with a used one.

Assembly is the exact opposite of dis-assembly. Now try to imagine doing this while the valve is installed and you are laying flat on your back underneath the tractor during the winter months? The price of the new cap will seem cheap at that moment.
 

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I don't disagree with that notion. But as you just stated, the finger of blame points in two directions. USPS will send out an inspector to view the packaging. He will say that the sender screwed up by not using strong enough materials to withstand the normal rigours of travel through the postal system. After all, the object is heavy. Most likely, the inspector will be right. I've been down this road far too many times in the past with e-bay sellers. The seller will claim that he's done no wrong and not responsible. Now what?

If the valve was paid for by Paypal, their rules require you to package the item up and return it to the seller FIRST......but at your own expense. Then Paypal will credit your account. If Alan H got a good deal when buying this valve and now has to go looking for a replacement PLUS eat the cost of return shipping........who suffers the most?

Costs are important but so is time, aggravation and frustration.
 

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I agree with Tom. When something like this happens sending it back is the only option when it's absolutely the wrong item or is beyond repair.


Also, the TCV is a royal pain in the butt to put back on unless you have someone else helping you get the bolts that hold it in back in place. You can even recruit your wife for the 5 minutes it will take them to help line up the bolts back in the holes.
 

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Alan is going to have to drill new mounting holes about 5/8" back from the OEM holes to mount this travel/lift valve with holding, so says Grummy who has done this conversion more than once in his checkered career. :sidelaugh: The lines going to the motor will also need some schmoozing to get them to fit nicely.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I'm in email conversation with the seller to see how he wants to handle it. I got a great deal and don't think I can replace it for what I paid for this one, so I'll probably keep and fix it. I am hoping he will be amenable to a partial reimbursement to help me cover the cost of the replacement cover. I did use PayPal, and the seller has already proposed a return and reimbursement, so he is trying to work with me... I'll see how it goes from here.

It's for a project tractor, so thankfully I'm not out of commission with this item, it was/is going to be a secondary TCV along the likes of one of grummy's very instructive posts. :thumbup: I am lucky that it has the float, as I was not sure when I won the auction... so either way it goes with the seller, I'll probably be keeping it, as I already have a line on a replacement cover thanks to one of the members on this forum.

Thanks for all the responses, the information has helped me alot!! :thumbsup:
 

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Just a sidebar thought here, to add to this thread. Shipping items such as this valve can bring problems because packages travel along conveyor belts in postal sorting stations that often have them dropping short distances to another conveyor or into a buggy. Vehicle vibration is also another issue the package has to contend with and if an item is packaged too close to the outer walls, it can rub its way through the cardboard or the impact from falling can cause the item to pierce the cardboard.

One way to prevent this from happening is to choose a box that is a bit larger than the item and then cut a piece of 1/2" or 3/8" thick plywood so that it fits snugly in the bottom of the box. Place the valve on the plywood and center it. Drill 1/4" holes in the plywood that line up with the valves mounting holes and bolt the valve to the plywood by inserting the bolts into the plywood first and putting the nuts next to the valve body.. Cut an extra piece of heavy corrugated cardboard to place in the box first and then put the valve/plywood in. The extra bit of cardboard will protect the bottom of the box from the bolt heads. Then pour foam peanuts all around the valve to FIRMLY fill up the voids between the sides of the box and the valve as well as the top of the box. Just before closing the box, put a full size sheet of copy paper on top of the peanuts that has the shipping address on it as well as YOUR address for return. You do this as a precaution in case the information you put on the outside becomes removed or unreadable. The postal authorities can then open the box, find the sheet and get the package delivered. With no information there, this valve would end up in the "unclaimed" section and eventually be disposed of in some manner.

As the shipper of any item, it is YOUR responsibility to choose proper packaging and use proper packing methods that will ensure safe passage for the item under normal circumstances. A postal truck that is involved in a highway crash is not normal circumstances but it can happen. The better you pack, the more likely it is for the item to arrive damage-free.
 

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Though that cover is dry inside it retains the rear spool seal. You may want to check it's condition. It sounds like you are going to replace the part. In my opinion this is not a good aplication for JB Weld.
 
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