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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Several people have expressed interest in making an OEM style pallet fork bracket that will attach to the loader in place of the bucket. I have shamelessly copied the OEM bracket from the manuals with a little measuring help from a friend.

This is not a particularly difficult project to complete with basic metal working equipment.

First some photos to familiarize you with what you're trying to make.

This is a side view.



This is a frontal view.



This is a rear view.



Another rear view.



Please, no snide comments about the welds on this project as I know they are crappy but they have held up under some pretty heavy stress. This was my first project with my mig welder and I didn't realize it wasn't setup properly until I was done.

As you can see in the photos the loader arms and dump cylinder connections are all in a line and consist of six matching plates welded to a 2" pipe and spaced to line up with the loader arms and cylinder end. The forks are simply bolted to two pieces of angle iron on the top and bottom of the plates.

The following is a diagram of the plates with dimensions. The only important things are to make sure the plates are welded on the pipe to line up with the loader arms and that the connection pin locations are correct so that it will pivot properly.

Below is a diagram of the plate.



The bill of materials is as follows

5 ft of 6" x 1/4" bar stock
28" of 2" x 1/8" round tube
6 ft of 2" x 2" x 1/4" angle iron
12" of 3" x 1/4" bar stock

You can substitute other material sizes but if you go down in size you may not have the OEM bulletproof strength. If you use a different pipe size be sure to adjust the hole size accordingly.

Here is a photo that shows it is strong--that is an oak log on the forks!



One final note, I originally made forks from standard 3"" channel iron and they worked quite well until I used them to try to dig one of those big logs out of the frozen tundra. I would have simply made another set the same way but I can across some forks from a forklift truck which are strong enough for anything. Since it is pretty much impossible to drill holes in forks I welded a couple of blocks of mild steel, tapped for 5/8" bolts, to the forks.
 

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Thank You very, very much Bart! :goodpost: A picture gives perspective compared to a drawing from the parts book and the dimensions are a plus. As soon as my "new" used welder arrives, I will be making a set of these.Again, many thanks to Bart! :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
 

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Just got a quote back on the steel to do this thing up.....$205. That is with 3 x 1 1/2 x 3/16 box for the forks and all plates punched.I don't think that is all that bad considering how much steel has gone up lately! :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I made mine up with scrap for $0. I would go to a welding shop and see what you can find in their scrap pile. As I noted previously the 3" channel works quite well for forks and will hold more than the loader capacity.
 

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Mr onetwo said:
Just got a quote back on the steel to do this thing up.....$205. That is with 3 x 1 1/2 x 3/16 box for the forks and all plates punched.I don't think that is all that bad considering how much steel has gone up lately! :thumbsup:
I am wondering where you got the quote from, local supplier or from the net.

Ted
 

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Ted Miller said:
[quote="Mr onetwo":wk7kva7r]Just got a quote back on the steel to do this thing up.....$205. That is with 3 x 1 1/2 x 3/16 box for the forks and all plates punched.I don't think that is all that bad considering how much steel has gone up lately! :thumbsup:
I am wondering where you got the quote from, local supplier or from the net.

Ted[/quote:wk7kva7r]
I got it from the local steel fabrication/supply co....no shipping! Got 3 different quotes and this was the lowest.Price difference between channel and box for the forks was only $10....I think the box section will do a nice looking job....I plan on tapering the tips in the first 8". :gums:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Stewart said:
I'm sure that a big hole saw would cost $50 here in :canada:
Since I don't have a CNC plasma cutter like some people do I just make a circular pattern out of masonite about 1/4" smaller in diameter than I want the finished hole. I drill a small hole (1/8") for a nail in the center of the pattern and the center of the hole position in the steel then take it all to my local welder buddy and he cuts the holes with his hand held plasma cutter in about 5 minutes. Cutting pieces with a plasma cutter takes no time and when you provide the pattern you eliminate most of the work.
 

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i agree with whats been said about a plasma making good use of time. i have a hypertherm powermax30 that I've had and baby'd for a few years now.

i discovered that a pallet jack/truck when disassembled sizes up to a 444 3 point hitch quite well.

my project has changed direction a few times. spare rearends and a volvo b20 showing up at your door can do that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
It has been brought to my attention that I made an error in transcribing the measurements on the diagram in my original post. The correct dimension for the center of the large hole to the left edge in the diagram should be 2-5/8", not 2". Also, the diameter of the large hole should be large enough to allow you to fit a 2" pipe (2-3/8" OD) through it--I would make the hole 2-1/2" to allow for easy alignment prior to welding.

Bart said:
Several people have expressed interest in making an OEM style pallet fork bracket that will attach to the loader in place of the bucket. I have shamelessly copied the OEM bracket from the manuals with a little measuring help from a friend.

This is not a particularly difficult project to complete with basic metal working equipment.

First some photos to familiarize you with what you're trying to make.

This is a side view.



This is a frontal view.



This is a rear view.



Another rear view.



Please, no snide comments about the welds on this project as I know they are crappy but they have held up under some pretty heavy stress. This was my first project with my mig welder and I didn't realize it wasn't setup properly until I was done.

As you can see in the photos the loader arms and dump cylinder connections are all in a line and consist of six matching plates welded to a 2" pipe and spaced to line up with the loader arms and cylinder end. The forks are simply bolted to two pieces of angle iron on the top and bottom of the plates.

The following is a diagram of the plates with dimensions. The only important things are to make sure the plates are welded on the pipe to line up with the loader arms and that the connection pin locations are correct so that it will pivot properly.

Below is a diagram of the plate.



The bill of materials is as follows

5 ft of 6" x 1/4" bar stock
28" of 2" x 1/8" round tube
6 ft of 2" x 2" x 1/4" angle iron
12" of 3" x 1/4" bar stock

You can substitute other material sizes but if you go down in size you may not have the OEM bulletproof strength. If you use a different pipe size be sure to adjust the hole size accordingly.

Here is a photo that shows it is strong--that is an oak log on the forks!



One final note, I originally made forks from standard 3"" channel iron and they worked quite well until I used them to try to dig one of those big logs out of the frozen tundra. I would have simply made another set the same way but I can across some forks from a forklift truck which are strong enough for anything. Since it is pretty much impossible to drill holes in forks I welded a couple of blocks of mild steel, tapped for 5/8" bolts, to the forks.
 

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I have a very nice set of OEM LL20 forks available in SE Mich. Shipping available, also.

Converted the 7020 to the quick attach system (also available for sale) and have the quick attach fork set. Won't be going back to changing out the forks on the pin mounts ... ever. LQA is just less than 5 minutes and no tools to swap the attachments on the front of the loader.

Drop me an eMail or PM for further information.

Brian
 

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I would like to thank Bart for starting this thread. Many of us don't have the money to buy oem attachments like LL-20 forks, but do have the skills to make our own, as long as we know the measurements. I started my forks and hopefully Bart doesn't mind me adding them to his thread :trink:

Here are the pieces cut



Pieces stacked up to make sure the holes line up :thumbsup:



Test fitted




I cut some lengths of 3/4" ID steel pipe to keep the pairs of brackets the correct distances apart while welding, they are held together with some 3/4" bolts

Heres where mine will differ from Barts. He pointed out that making a sliding mechanism rather than bolting the forks on the angle iron would add weight, and reduce lift capacity. He is absolutely right. I weighed the pro's and con's of doing it each way. In the end I decided to lose the 30 lbs of lift capacity (what my "mechanism" ended up weighing) in order to gain the convienence of not having to bolt/unbolt them each time.
Heres how im doing it.



Im using 2 pieces of 3" wide x 1/2" thick steel, which will get welded to the angle irons. The top one will have to be 2 pieces because of the small 2 brackets for the top pin connection. The forks I got have the "ears" already welded on to go over the 1/2" bar. I'll post pics of it after its painted and on the tractor. Already have a few jobs in mind for them.

Thanks again to Bart, for taking the time to help out other members :trink:
 

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Got it all welded up and on the tractor.





Had to test it out :mrgreen:





The "smaller" rock is a piece of granite measuring approx. 3' x 20" x average of 4-5" (smaller on one end, bigger on the other)
Seeing how granite weighs about 166/cubic foot, it should weigh approx. 300 lbs give or take

The larger piece is the same rock I had lifted sideways in another pic, one of the mods told me it was an inch thick, mmm. no. :lol:



I really like the slide mechanism, works very well, and acts as a stiffener to the angle irons. Don't see this bending anytime soon
 
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