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Hey all, This is a question for those of you that have loaded your rear tires. How did you do it?? I just bought 20 gal of windshield washer fluid and am ready to load the tires on my 1970 444.. (yes, I installed tubes) did you just get a small plastic hose and siphon it in??? or ??? That is how I loaded the tires on my VAC-14, but this is going to take a lot smaller diameter hose than the farm tractor did.... Thanks!!
 

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I have some questions on this subject too. How many gallons does it normally take to fill a tire, does it make the ride any rougher, my buckshot muddersthat the po installed stand up and look perfectly fine at 0 psi and they are supposed to have 80 so I don't think my ride could get any worse.
 

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You don't need tubes, Dave. There's nothing corrosive about WW A/F. Had you left the tubes out, you could have broken the bead just on the valve side of the rim with the tire/rim laying flat on the floor. Push the tire bead away from the rim and literally pour the A/F directly into the cavity. When it won't take any more, release the tire sidewall to allow it to touch the rim once more and the put the air to the valve stem to reseat the bead.

Now that you have tubes in the tires, filling them is not as easy.

Inflate and deflate the tubes a couple of times to properly position the tubes in the tires and to also seat the beads.

You may have to clamp a mini pair of needle-nose Vicegrips onto the valve stem to hold it in place while you are filling the tubes. With the tire/rim on the tractor and the tractor on axle stands, put the valve stem at 2 o'clock. Take a plastic bucket of any size larger than one gallon and drill a hole in the side of it about an inch above the bottom so that you can pull another tubeless tire valve stem through it. You need a length of rubber hose that is a snug fit over the valve stems. Support the bucket on a bench or anything that puts it higher than the tire. Pour the A/F into the bucket and allow it to gravity feed into the tire. It's a slow process. You want an 80% fill, hence the 2 o'clock positioning of the valve stem.
 

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I put about 12 gallons in each 8-16 tire.

I pump it in, not gravity feed. Any suitable pump will do and then you must periodically stop, bleed pressure off the tire, then start pumping again.

My preferred tool is a 30 gallon electric tow behind sprayer ... lawn sprayer. I can dump the W/S solvent in while it is pumping. I just use a fitting that is not tight to the valve stem and sort of clamp it in place ... allows some bleed while filling. Haven't been able to locate a proper tire filling valve for the small valve stems ...

Takes about 10-15 minutes this way.

Brian
 

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After seeing the recommendations on several different forums, I picked up one of these at Tractor Supply for <$10.
The Slime® Air/Water Adapter Kit connects to standard garden hose to allow for ballast to be added to tires. For use on air/water valves, standard valve stems, new style fast flow valves and large bore valve and extensions.
-- Connects to a standard tractor valve
-- Built-in bleeder releases trapped air
I'll be using it this week. My tires are tubed. I'm taking an old (clean!) 5 gal bucket and attaching a 2' length of garden hose to the bottom. I'll set that higher than the tire, keep filling it, then let gravity do the rest.
 

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I forced mine in with an air compressor.


Take the cap from one of the WW jugs and drill two 1/2 inch holes in it.

Lay the tire you're going to fill on your garage floor with the valve stem facing up.

Remove the valve stem core.

Run a length of vacuum/fuel line tubing over the valve stem and through one of the holes you drilled in the cap.

Screw the cap onto a full jug of WW fluid with the hose reaching all the way to the bottom of the jug.

Use your air compressor to pressurize the jug of WW fluid. The pressure will force the liquid into the tire. You'll have to stop every 1/3 of a jug or so to let air back out of the tire.

This method is very quick and cheap. It will probably take you longer to get the now 150lb tires back onto the tractor than it did to fill them with fluid. :trink:
 

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Snotrocket said:
It will probably take you longer to get the now 150lb tires back onto the tractor than it did to fill them with fluid. :trink:
Discarding the lug bolts and adding bolts threaded in from the inboard side of the axle simplifies this task. Even if you only swap two, it gives you a way to "hang" the wheel on the axle instead of struggling with alignment. add 2 lug nuts ( 1/2" fine) from a Ford P-U and you`re good to go.
For filling I went with the pour in through the broken bead method. :thumbup:
 

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I used a transfer pump from Harbor Freight, under 5 dollars and loaded my front tires. If I do the rear I will use beat juice, the dealers usually load them for you. Here is a video that I used to figure how to load the tires. Not a case but same procedure

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Toe8ifXX418
 

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Snotrocket said:
Plus they will charge you shop time.
My understanding was the total price would be about 2.75 to 3.00 dollars a gallon installed. When I originally went there I wanted to buy the beat juice and load the front tires myself. I was told they install it there but they were all out and would not be getting a shipment until the fall. I would rather do it myself and be able to leave the tires on the tractor, it did not take that long to pump a gallon into the front tires. I will check with them on Monday and let you know.
 

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Installing the axle bolts is a terrific idea (and add to this thread!). Makes it far easier to mount and unmount the tires.

I've done this with a few Ingersolls now. I use a high quality 1/2"-20 allen head bolt, run from the inside with a lock washer. Needs to be good and tight so nothing loosens up later in use.

Any common 1/2-20 tapered lug nut will then work great.

New production Ingersolls have had axle bolts and lug nuts for about 4 years now, rather than the old lug bolts. Another small, but nice, improvement.


On that tire filling valve, let me know if that one works for you. I am of the impression it is for tractor tire valves and will be too big ...

Brian
 

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bhildret said:
On that tire filling valve, let me know if that one works for you. I am of the impression it is for tractor tire valves and will be too big ...

Brian
The threads on the end are too big, but they include 2 adapters - one of those fits regular stems, I already checked.
 

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markgru02919 said:
Snotrocket said:
Plus they will charge you shop time.
My understanding was the total price would be about 2.75 to 3.00 dollars a gallon installed. When I originally went there I wanted to buy the beat juice and load the front tires myself. I was told they install it there but they were all out and would not be getting a shipment until the fall. I would rather do it myself and be able to leave the tires on the tractor, it did not take that long to pump a gallon into the front tires. I will check with them on Monday and let you know.
Maybe your local dealer is better than mine. I've never had good luck with mine. He quoted me $2.50 a gallon for the beet juice and said it would take 2 hours of shop time to fill the tires because they don't have a fill port and they would need to go through the valve stem.

Either way the WW is 1/3 the cost of the beet juice and you don't gain anything going with the latter.

The best thing about having filled tires is it's a hidden modification. Nobody can tell you're carrying around an extra 225lbs of weight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Bill.H said:
After seeing the recommendations on several different forums, I picked up one of these at Tractor Supply for <$10.
The Slime® Air/Water Adapter Kit connects to standard garden hose to allow for ballast to be added to tires. For use on air/water valves, standard valve stems, new style fast flow valves and large bore valve and extensions.
-- Connects to a standard tractor valve
-- Built-in bleeder releases trapped air
I'll be using it this week. My tires are tubed. I'm taking an old (clean!) 5 gal bucket and attaching a 2' length of garden hose to the bottom. I'll set that higher than the tire, keep filling it, then let gravity do the rest.
Awesome!!! I going to have to get one of those!.. TSC here I come!!
 

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Bill.H said:
After seeing the recommendations on several different forums, I picked up one of these at Tractor Supply for <$10.
The Slime® Air/Water Adapter Kit connects to standard garden hose to allow for ballast to be added to tires. For use on air/water valves, standard valve stems, new style fast flow valves and large bore valve and extensions.
-- Connects to a standard tractor valve
-- Built-in bleeder releases trapped air
I'll be using it this week. My tires are tubed. I'm taking an old (clean!) 5 gal bucket and attaching a 2' length of garden hose to the bottom. I'll set that higher than the tire, keep filling it, then let gravity do the rest.
Thanks for posting that. I just ordered one from Amazon. $11 with free shipping. It pays to be a Prime member.
 
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