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Discussion Starter #1
Well as I posted recently I was looking to buy a WW40 wheel weight. Received a few suggestions from this awesome forum and decided to make one. What was left of the WW40 weight was the lower plastic piece. When I was a young machinist I often worked in the pattern room helping to make patterns for castings, so I had to improvise because I didn't have a lathe to turn it round and the conical angle round. What I ended up making was a pattern taking measurements from the other wheel weight on the right side.

I basically drew it up and ended up making (20) 18 degree blocks, faceted which would be round once strapped together. I used 1/2" PVC for bolt guides and used dowels in the bottom board to keep it aligned, 10 1/2" bolt circle. Anyways here's some pictures, BTW I filled it Quickreet 5000 1 inch from the top and filled the rest using mortar.

all.JPG
 

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Pretty nice, what did they end up weighing? I was thinking of doing this until some weights kind of fell in my lap.


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Concrete works, but my feedback is that its only 1/3 the weight of cast iron for the same size - shape.

You need a block of cement 3 times the size of the same block of cast iron for the same weight.
 

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Concrete works, but my feedback is that its only 1/3 the weight of cast iron for the same size - shape.

You need a block of cement 3 times the size of the same block of cast iron for the same weight.
Agreed. Almost any metal is more dense than concrete. I showed that in a chart in a previous post.

For some crazy reason, beet juice is cost prohibitive here but for a lot of guys, its very cost effective. Even cheaper than doing it yourself with RV antifreeze and has superior freeze protection and density.

That said, :deadhorse:but I get along just fine without permanent ballast, except in the front tires of the 4018, equipped with a 3pt. Different soil types and more snow, might change my mind but I can't relate to wanting the hundreds of pounds I see some guys load their mowing tractors up with.
 

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DJ, you did some really nice work there. Unfortunately, as a no B.S. concrete expert, the medium is a poor choice for this application.

Its relatively inexpensive, readily available, formable and heavy. Those are the only good points and it falls short, relative to other choices on the latter.

"Concrete cracks. Thats what it does."

Quikreet 5000, is a high early mix and 5,000 psi. is nothing to sneeze at but thats in compression, where concrete excels. In tension, it sucks. Adding fiber mesh, would have helped a lot and if I had to, would be my choice but any reinforcing, so long as it had adequate cover (1") would have been better than none. Chicken wire, hardware cloth, threaded rod spread around, anything.

Quikreet does make a fiber mesh product.

https://quikrete.com/productlines/fiberreinforceddeckmixpro.asp

Air entrainment, adds microscopic bubbles and up to a point, does improve strength and frost protection. I should know, I ran the lab tests, in developing the general mix. (Not for Quikreet) You don't need anything fancy for that. Plain old dish soap will do it. You just don't want more than 7%, so a little goes a long way.

Any home mixed concrete I place, has a squirt of dish soap and one of the now many, concrete glues, put right in the mix. Especially helpful with thin applications / patching.

Embedding big washers, on each end of the bolt holes, would have been handy too, as if it would give the opportunity to put the mass in compression. I would have gone with a monolithic pour but at a minimum, pinning the two, while still plastic, with say, a half doz. 2" bolts spread around would help prevent the inevitable separation you'll experience.

But thats all water under the bridge at this point. For now, about the best I can recommend, is to get one of the rubberized coatings (Flexseal, Plastidip etc.) and paint the hell out of it. Quikreet 5000 is billed as having frost protection but it won't be enough.

EDIT

"For now, about the best I can recommend, is to get one of the rubberized coatings (Flexseal, Plastidip etc.) and paint the hell out of it."

Keep it protected from freezing, dry and inside, for at least 21 days before painting. It takes a while for the moisture to cure out.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well my only intention was to duplicate the stock WW40 which weighs 75lbs. I only made one and it weighed 80lbs.
 

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Hey Dave, thanks for thorough reply. You know my intention was to duplicate the stock WW40 weight that is still on. I basically did what the OEM did, I had an old email from Ingersol when they were still in Portland, ME and they were very helpful. I should have drove the hour to buy there last set 3 years ago when I noticed the plastic separating, but I didn't. Instead the tech guy told me how they're made, so I basically did what he wrote. My mold was right on and with the 1/2" pvc at the correct length allowed me not to overtighten them. Hey if it breaks apart, I'll make another and take your suggestions under consideration. Thanks.
 

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As mentioned, you did really nice work. And Ingersoll made really great tractors and attachments but pretty crappy weights. :wink:

Can't blame you for wanting to match your other one though. :thumbup:

Two guarantees we used to give about concrete ... "It will crack and no one will steal it."

I'd still try to come up with a way to enhance what you've made. Maybe encapsulate it in fiberglass cloth and resin?
 

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That's NOT that crazy. Along with the comment about a few coats of fiberglass..

I followed a build your own boats forum for a while and there was a, lets say very off the grid gentleman, that built lots of boats and the guy used PL - 400 (polyurethane construction glue) and fiberglass cloth to hold plywood boats together.. And it REALLY did work. He did not like or maybe was allergic to Epoxy and Poly resins and stuff.

You could use truck bed liner and fiberglass cloth to cover cement weights and give it a more finished look, also would waterproof it. The fiberglass clothe is a reinforcement, regardless of whether you are using Epoxy or Poly Resin, or PL - 400 or anything that sets up and could benefit from some reinforcement.

A few coats of truck bed liner?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Dave, lets see how long this one lasts. The stock ones lasted 15 1/2 years, not bad. I snow blowed yesterday, we got around 7" wet heavy slightly frozen snow from a late Saturday storm. So far so good!! I do like your resin and bolt idea. Next time I will enhance it.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Here's an update on wheel weight:

Made it through another New Englander winter. We had 11 storms and used my tractor on all of them. A couple were bitter cold but only got around 5" each time. But, the wheel weight I made is still intact, no visible cracks at all. So the next test will be on how it holds up in warm weather, 70's to 90's.....stay tuned!! I'll report back.
 
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