Case Colt Ingersoll Tractors banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am replacing the "bearing flanges" which are in reality just bushings. However, I admit, I have no idea how to proceed...

I recently replaced the axle seals in the transmission of my 1973 Case and in the process discovered the axels themselves were VERY worn at the position where they meet the inner bushings, as well as both inner bushings (bearing(s)/flange('es) being worn also. So I bought used replacement axels, and ordered new bushings (not happy with the unannounced 2 week delay on these parts - I bet Brain would have done better), however, I cannot turn back.

Now the the transmission is completely removed and disassembled, I have no idea how to remove the inner bushings. Do I heat them, or is there a special tool or method?, I tried pounding them out with a steel bar but they do not budge.

Do I need to take this to some specially shop?
:eek:
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,618 Posts
I have to wonder as to which way you are trying to drive the bushings.


The bushings are flanged. When installing them, you insert them from the outer ends of the housing and drive them inward until they seat against the lip that is machined into the housing. To remove them, you must drive them from the inside to the outside by using a long steel rod that passes through the bushing on the left or right side first and reaches the bushing on the opposite side. They are just "press fit" into the housing and should remove without too much force. Just so you know, there is a thing called a "bearing puller" that consists of expandable jaws on a slide hammer. You insert the jaws through the bushing, expand them so that they grab the edges of the bushing and then use the slide hammer to yank the bushing out of the housing. Rental houses often have this type of puller.

A last ditch effort is to use a Sawzall with a long, fine blade on it and carefully slice the bushing all the way through in a couple of spots. Then use a cold chisel to split the flange open and extract the bushing a piece at a time. This should not be necessary but it is an option.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
great news,

after pounding and pounding, my neighbor came over and discovered the inner sleeve of the axel shaft was con-caved. By simply raising the ram rod over the inner lip, the bushings popped out with very little resistance!!

Now I am just waiting for the new bushings.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top