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I can buy a P220 engine complete out of a Bobcat. 400 hours on it. I have seen it run. It has a tapered shaft. I thought about picking it up for future use if it will work in my 448. Question is will it work?
 

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fatbob
the taper crank is almost a killer deal. i,m surprised that the bobcat has it. (UNLESS the bobcat is a miller welder)
my manual shows four different lengths of the taper shaft.
when used on your 448 it should clean up at 1" dia, which is o.k. as far as i,m concerned.
the bad, you need to remove the crank to do it properly. (in my opinion)
if i were to use a P in place of a M
i would use ALL of the B M parts. oil pan, starter, flywheel, sheet metal, ignition, etc., etc..
price you pay for the engine will determine a lot.
if you get me the spec# i can tell you all the options the engine has.
e/ mail or call 651 437 2826
thank you. boomer
 

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Would it not be possible to use the tapered shaft but come up with something between the crant and the pump and/or clutches. Seems like it would be easier and cheaper in the long run to do that assuming the packaging works out.
 

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Rockdog said:
Would it not be possible to use the tapered shaft but come up with something between the crant and the pump and/or clutches. Seems like it would be easier and cheaper in the long run to do that assuming the packaging works out.
This would not be a course of action that I would take.

The crank stub on engines spec'd for use in Case GT's is very short because it just has to be long enough to slide one half of a LoveJoy style coupler onto it. Trying to adapt a LoveJoy coupler half to a tapered shaft would not be a fun project and then trying to make sure it did not move along the taper and come loose would also be a challenge.

The best long-term solution is to just remove the crankshaft, spin it in a lathe and change the tapered shaft to a 1" straight shaft. Then clamp the crankshaft onto a milling machine and cut the key-way into it. Yes.. it's a bit of a PITA to take the engine apart but if you do this right at the outset, you put all those issues behind you permanently. You won't have to pull the engine two weeks later due to a failed coupler.
 

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Hey Boomer, while we are on this subject, I've got a B48G - GAO19.9 / 3713B serial# j793484911 that I picked up on ebay to replace a bad engine in a 226 (busted connecting rod). I know that I need to swap out the flywheel & oil pan, & I'm pretty sure the crank is too long, is there any thing else that I need to be aware of? Also, can you give me some idea as to what this engine was originally used for & its specs? The previous owner had purchased it from an older lady whose husband had passed away, and he was using it to run a 4000 watt genset in his garage but had no idea about its origins. Any info you could provide would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks, Dan.
 

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Once concern will be the governor. Onan engines could be governed at different speeds, including 1800 rpm for long service life in generator duty. It too, may have a tapered output shaft on the crank.
 

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dan
GOOD news.
your B48G is from a Sears tractor.(engine built in oct. 79)
19.9 h.p. 1 1/8 crank.
i currently use the same engine in my 448.
here is what to do.
keep the G short block, with front cover, oil pump and pickup, and cyl. heads. (the heads perform better)
then mount all of your other M parts,and cut the crank as you stated.
you will have to slightly modify your side tin to fit the G heads (easy)
if your 226 did not have an oil filter, you will need to trim the sheet metal to clear the oil filter.
if i were you i would do a de carbon and adjust the valves at this time.
in my opinion this is a very easy swap, good luck. and keep us posted.
boomer
 

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Thanks Boomer. As always, a quick, informative reply. You are as reliable as gravity, and a real asset to all of the forums in which you participate. As luck would have it, the 226 is indeed equipped with an oil filter, making the swap simpler.

When I got this engine home, I hooked up a battery & a remote fuel supply, hit the starter button, and was amazed that it immediately came to life with what seemed like one revolution of the starter. It ran smooth as silk with no smoke, rattles, knocks, or noises of any kind. I was like a kid on Christmas morning. As eager as I am to make this swap, I have 5 or 6 projects in front of it, so it will have to wait a little while. Thanks again for all of your help, & I will start a new thread when the project gets under way.

Dan.
 
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