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Recently there has been much discussion of a shortage of Non C/L posts.
So... in the interest of creating more "infield chatter" I`ll ask the following mostly pointless question.

My `87 446 runs great but burns a lot of oil. (2000 hrs)
Have a freshened short block coming from our esteemed Onan guru. ( THANKS!)
Have the 4020PS and a Simplicity for backup :mowlawn: while performing the transplant.

OPTION 1. I run the B43 until it begins to foul plugs or otherwise fails. I guess it would be interesting to see how long the old Onan will soldier on. Of course it might throw a rod :thumbdown: and bust the crankcase, this would "complicate" my plan to rebuild the original engine.

OPTION 2. I get busy and perform the swap ASAP.

Hopefully, this question will provide us with 15 minutes of entertainment. :sidelaugh:

T.I.A.
 

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If it was mine, I definetely WOULD NOT run the existing motor until it stopped. That could possibly finish it for good. As long as you have alternate tractors, I would give it a rest until you get your short block swapped. By the way, I've been in the Excavating business for going on 34 years now and have experienced only 1 or 2 catastrophic engine failures over the years, knock wood!
 

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I would not let it fail and perhaps cause more damage. I would want to know the condition of the cylinders to determine what it would take for a rebuild. It could be that a fresh set of rings and a light honing might do the trick. You never know until you get in there.
 

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RUN IT 'TILL IT BLOWS!!! put the video in Youtube. :sidelaugh: No, actually I would do the swap and get the original redone before any more damage is done. Cheaper, the less parts to replace. If you had my luck, rods would break, destroying the crankshaft and block, and would have nothing worth rebuilding. :thumbup:
 

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Option 2

It's easier to fix up a complete engine that doesn't have holes in the side of the block. If it blows up, you are either going to have a more expensive rebuild or a engine that can't be rebuilt.
 

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Onan Master, new and used parts.
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randy
as long as you keep at least one quart of oil in it,
i highly doubt that you will BLOW it up.

NOW, that this subject (blowing it up) was brought up,
i may have to try it some day.
SMILE. boomer
 
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