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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have seen the paint color question come up on the tractors but what about the mower deck and snowcaster? It seems like the casters and mower decks are more of a red color where my tractor is more orange? I have an '87 226 if that helps.
I plan on a complete restore on my mower deck before spring.
 

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Power Red has been the only red used on mower decks and all other attachments since the 1968 model year ended.

Ask yourself this question.

Why would Case use two different shades of red on their equipment in any given year?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·


Maybe I am just color blind but these two tractors have different colors. My '87 226 looks more like the orange tinted one but i swear my mower deck is a darker red like the other tractor?

Am I crazy? Or is it just the lighting or what?
 

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I went out and compared my 1986 deck and tractor and the paint looks the same as the original portion of the tractor (I did a partial restore). Your 226 does look on the orange side in the picture. Perhaps it's just the run of paint in the factory (did this happen, a little variation in pigment?) or did the tractor paint fade a little more for some reason? Is it possible your tractor was repainted?
:222: :446: Best Regards, Rich
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Rich,
Thanks for checking out yours and giving me some feedback. The picture of the orangeish one isnt even my tractor that is just a google search image I found but my tractor looks identical to that one. This is one is mine:



I am not 100% certain however I think the paint is original.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If you also look at the snowcaster that I restored it is painted with Kabota Orange paint that I bought at tractor supply. You can see part of the of the snowcaster lift arm in the close up picture and you can see it is not a perfect match but its not terribly off either.
 

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FWIW,
The shade of Power Red on my '96 4020 does appear to be slightly darker than the Power Red on my newer 4016 and my older Case 400's. I wouldn't be too surprised to learn that over the years there were slight variations in the shades of Power Red used by Case/Ingersoll.
Tim
 

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What your eye sees and even what the camera lens sees, can vary widely just based on the TYPE of light used to illuminate the tractor. Incandescent, fluorescent, metal halide, halogen, mercury vapour and high pressure sodium lamps will make the paint look different than when it is outside in bright sunlight. Time can cause fading due to exposure to light that has components in the ultra-violet spectrum. On rare occasions, paint can be altered by exposure to chemicals.

Talk to any pro level painter and he will tell you that consistency is job 1. In other words, you use the exact same primer everywhere on the tractor. You mix up ONE single batch of paint that is large enough to do the complete job. You do not alter the percentages of hardener and thinners when spraying the major items such as hoods, fenders, panels and the frame. Those who do not follow those rules, run the risk of the paint job not coming out the way they expect it to.

The intensity of the light along with the direction of the light can also impact on what you see.


Did Power Red change over the years? Perhaps. After all, the tractors were originally painted with spray guns inside a spray booth but that gave way to powder coating some time in the early 90's. When you have a signature colour like Power Red, then it stands to reason that you are going to tell the powder supplier that he has to match that colour exactly. I don't think that Ingersoll would have allowed anything to leave the plant that was not a perfect match or so close to being one that no one could easily pick it out. After all, what would a dealer say if he had six tractors on the floor and 2 of them were painted a dramatically different shade of red? Wouldn't the buying public also react negatively to implements that did not match their tractor?

I cannot explain why you see what you see but logic tells me that there is an explanation that has nothing to do with what happened at Winneconne.
 

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I'm going to start off by saying I know little about Case/Ingersoll paint..

However, Back in the 40's 50's and 60's, a few major farm equipment manufacturers would have variances in their paint, even in the same day.. Allis-Chalmers was probably one of the worst judging by what I have read in the books.. Massey-Harris and IH did the same, according to what I have read (they likely all did I imagine).

The paint was brought in barrels, and they would buy from whatever manufacturer was cheapest or could supply the order in timely fashion (can't be shutting down production due to lack of paint.. Line isn't moving, we aren't making money).. Not saying Ingersoll did this, but it is a possibility.. I will also agree with the statement that a change in primer, thinners/reducers, hardeners, and even application techniques can cause a difference in appearance.

My suggestion would be to buy the "correct" color from a dealer, or get a code and have a higher end paint mixed and get after it.. However, I have found out the tractor I have been restoring is "supposedly" a incorrect shade of red.. No one can prove to me exactly what color it should have been in 1953 though (we can all speculate as to what code is "correct", show me concrete..)..

In the end, the important thing is you like the looks of it.. (not saying you should paint it green with a yellow seat or anything like that though LOL, but, you own it, and if thats what you want to do, who would I be to judge?? :sidelaugh: It's supposed to be the land of the free yanno.. lol)

Brad
 

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In your reply, you imply that price was the main criteria. I would disagree with that notion. What manufacturer of Ag and construction machinery would choose a paint that would not stand up to the elements? Would customers be happy with paint that flaked off or allowed their machine to exhibit serious rusting issues within the first 5 years after purchase?

I would agree that paint companies would have to submit a price to the Ag company to supply paint in drums for the plant along with packaged product for the dealers. Most certainly, price would be an important consideration but I doubt that quality would fall by the wayside just to save in this area. Warranty costs and lost confidence by customers simply isn't worth the risk. Perhaps things were a bit different in the 40's, 50's and 60's but a lot has changed since then. In this discussion, we are focusing on the Ingersoll era which began really...in 1984. If anything.... Jack Ingersoll had to prove to his customer base that he wasn't about to cheapen the product in any way. Nothing is more front and centre with the buying public than the appearance of the tractor when they first walk into the showroom. After all, if you can't even get the paint right, then what other shortcuts did you take?

The current supplier of liquid paint products to Case/IH is Valspar, a global company that began in 1806. The product is available at pretty much any Case/IH dealer all across North America and if you follow the rules when applying it, you end up with an excellent, durable finish. If you wish to spend 2 or 3 times as much, then getting this colour from someone that mixes paint for the auto-body industry is certainly within your right. The question is........is it really worth it?
 

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Ok, I didn't man to imply that Ingersoll would intentionally "cheapen" the product, just saying that perhaps they used different paint companies (or powder coat makers, since you said thy went to powder coat) and that could certainly cause the "variance" in the color the original poster is seeing.. Of course, the color could vary slightly from every barrel, bucket, or can.. You and I both know this, just like the application process can make the color vary.. Or fading from being stored outdoors, or inside where light reflects through a window as opposed to that stored in a dark corner.. Basically, I was just trying to say seeing an "off" color could be perfectly normal and still be factory original.. I have noticed both on my Case 120 LGT and my full size 930 that there seems to be a couple spots (mainly hidden spots) where the color does not look right to be the 60's era tan, but more like that used on the later 70's era farm tractors (a more "yellow" look to it, IMO).. However, the tan on both is faded nearly to white (where it isn't rusty :sidelaugh: ) and I believe both are in their original skin.

I will also agree that the painting had changed from the 40's to 60's as opposed to that of the 80's, like it has to today.. In the older era, on farm tractors, most farmers really didn't care if it was the "exact" shade, or if there was some runs, sags, or thin spots.. It just had to work. Lawn equipment, IMO, would be different, as it appeals more to John Q. Homeowner, and I'll even admit, if I were in the market for a new lawn tractor (be it 1965, 85, 2012, or 2050) it HAS TO LOOK GOOD!! You are right, if the Ingersoll didn't look good, no one would have bought em..

As for the auto paint over the Iron Gard.. Is it worth it? Only the person who owns the tractor can decide. I will say this: Due to the wonderful Valspar paint from my local TSC, it has left a bad taste in my mouth.. I suppose it don't necessarily have to be totally the paint.. some of it was an inexperienced me painting, but either way, it faded horribly..

HOWEVER.. I have bought some C-IH paint in RED form.. LOL.. (unbeknown to me that it was Valspar.. I recently learned that) to paint my little buddy's pedal tractor I "refurbished" for him, and this far, I am actually very pleased with it, and everything I have used the remaining red on.. It does in fact hold color very well (even without hardener) and seems to be quite durable against scratches and chips.. Seems to be a very quality product indeed..

My dad and I are considering using Iron Gard on our next resto project (Farmall/IH tractor), but I personally am still leery.. My latest project I have used a higher end product and this far I really like my results..


I guess I need to learn to just keep my trap shut and not start a debate all the time :sidelaugh:

Brad
 

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Brad Gyde said:
Ok, I didn't man to imply that Ingersoll would intentionally "cheapen" the product, just saying that perhaps they used different paint companies (or powder coat makers, since you said thy went to powder coat) and that could certainly cause the "variance" in the color the original poster is seeing.. Of course, the color could vary slightly from every barrel, bucket, or can.. You and I both know this, just like the application process can make the color vary.. Or fading from being stored outdoors, or inside where light reflects through a window as opposed to that stored in a dark corner.. Basically, I was just trying to say seeing an "off" color could be perfectly normal and still be factory original.. I have noticed both on my Case 120 LGT and my full size 930 that there seems to be a couple spots (mainly hidden spots) where the color does not look right to be the 60's era tan, but more like that used on the later 70's era farm tractors (a more "yellow" look to it, IMO).. However, the tan on both is faded nearly to white (where it isn't rusty :sidelaugh: ) and I believe both are in their original skin.

Brad,
After hearing that cci waz using velspar for there oem skin my ears turned up, And thought

I will also agree that the painting had changed from the 40's to 60's as opposed to that of the 80's, like it has to today.. In the older era, on farm tractors, most farmers really didn't care if it was the "exact" shade, or if there was some runs, sags, or thin spots.. It just had to work. Lawn equipment, IMO, would be different, as it appeals more to John Q. Homeowner, and I'll even admit, if I were in the market for a new lawn tractor (be it 1965, 85, 2012, or 2050) it HAS TO LOOK GOOD!! You are right, if the Ingersoll didn't look good, no one would have bought em..

As for the auto paint over the Iron Gard.. Is it worth it? Only the person who owns the tractor can decide. I will say this: Due to the wonderful Valspar paint from my local TSC, it has left a bad taste in my mouth.. I suppose it don't necessarily have to be totally the paint.. some of it was an inexperienced me painting, but either way, it faded horribly..

HOWEVER.. I have bought some C-IH paint in RED form.. LOL.. (unbeknown to me that it was Valspar.. I recently learned that) to paint my little buddy's pedal tractor I "refurbished" for him, and this far, I am actually very pleased with it, and everything I have used the remaining red on.. It does in fact hold color very well (even without hardener) and seems to be quite durable against scratches and chips.. Seems to be a very quality product indeed..

My dad and I are considering using Iron Gard on our next resto project (Farmall/IH tractor), but I personally am still leery.. My latest project I have used a higher end product and this far I really like my results..

I guess I need to learn to just keep my trap shut and not start a debate all the time :sidelaugh:

Brad
Brad,
Theres a couple words in your post that made my ears pop up,
1) velspar
2)tractor supply
Those 2 words add up to the worst possable, POOREST excuse, and abuse, of the word PAINT... That Ive ever experienced..
I waz quick to check, where your posting from and see you are here in my home state.
We both have had BAD experinces with there chit...
Maybe, since whe are likely on the same delivery route, its not a wide spread problem with there product. But, at this point, Iam dun with velspar. And there sorry ass excuse of a product they call paint...

kubotakid :usa2:
 

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My experience was different: :thumbsup: I had excellent results using the Case International paint which has been indicated by Hydriv to be manufactured by Valspar. The hardener that was sold with the paint from the Case Dealer was labeled Valspar and the reducer was labeled Case International. I used hardener and reducer and followed the instructions regarding ratios and application and painted under accepted guidelines. I also used the Case Iron Guard Primer and a good body filler. I still have more genuine Case International Power Red on hand for future projects. Before I purchased a spray gun I also used their spray cans on implements with pretty good results. :usa: :usa: :usa:
:222: :446: Best Regards, Rich
 

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For what it's worth: Speaking only of my 1971 442, which I'm certain has its original paint, and which happens to be the only Case GT I've ever seen in person, the red doesn't look red to me at all. It looks very much orange.

In fact, as I brought up in another post, "Rustoleum Engine Enamel" in the color "Chevy Orange" ($5 rattle cans at Home Depot) is a PERFECT match to the power red parts of my tractor: I've sprayed it on a couple weld repairs and you cannot discern where the original paint ends and the sprayed paint begins.

Bob
 

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Kubotakid,

I will admit, I have used MANY of the colors TSC sells. Some of it is worse than others.. Their red.. JUNK.. I painted a disc with their JD green and a paint brush (hey, it looked better than the rust) and it held color decent. I painted a grain wagon and a pickup with the allis orange.. The truck is long gone, but a neighbor still has the wagon.. it is faded some, but still looks pretty good from the road.. My first attempt at painting I used it to paint the tractor I put a picture up on one of the boards about painting with HVLP guns.. It was a absolute nightmare to remove.. Started with a sandblaster.. could see that was gonna take forever, so, I went to the hardware store and bought a sprayable stripper (you know, with the squirt bottle) and poured it into a old HF syphon paint sprayer, and went to it.. when it bubbled good, I pressure washed it off.. Took 3 times, but then I was in good shape.. Hit the rusty spots with the sandblaster and away I went.

Rich,

As I said, I have bought a total of one quart Iron Gard.. and I'm happy with that.. Would I do a full on restore with it?? I don't know at this point.. A neighbor used to paint tractors for a living.. It's all he used, and it always turned out good for him. I don't know what the difference between it and that of the TSC garbage (both a valspar product) but there is no comparing.. The Iron Gard is "thin" much like auto quality paint (at least my quart of IH red is) as opposed to the TSC stuff being about the equivalent of maple syrup. I have read on another forum that the Iron Gard is a modified alkyd (where TSC is just a full alkyd) and it has more/better UV inhibitors in it, which would really boost the "quality" of the paint. I've never sprayed it to get a nice quality finish, but when brushed on it just don't seem to have that shine.. But that was it, I brushed it on and done.. No color sanding, no hardeners, no reducers.. Brushed it on the "hood" of little man's pedal tractor, and his radio flyer.. Hey, he's happy, so that's the important part LOL.

Brad
 
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