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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do you think I would be asking too much from my 7020 if I were to put this plow in it:

http://maine.craigslist.org/grd/2163294897.html

The current owner has made sheet metal mounts to slide over the cutting edge of the bucket, and then drilled holes in his bucket to mount it. I'd really rather not drill holes in my bucket, but I am sure I can come up with another way to mount it. Just wondering if I have the HP to move that kind of snow.

I guess I could always cut it down to a better size with a torch!

Thanks for the advice and expertise!

(no I haven't given up on the hydraulic snowblower!)
 

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I don't think you'd have any trouble in the HP are pushing snow with that. I have my 54" plow (and wishing it was wider!!) mounted to a snap fast mount on the front of my articulated, and use the loader to lift it. One of the main reasons I did it this way was so I didn't have that extra length sticking out in front of the tractor like you would if you mounted it on the bucket. Here's a picture:



 

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Your tractor will handle it but..............

you should make a quik-tach setup similar to what's used on skid-steer loaders so you can swap the bucket for the blade and back again in seconds. If you don't do this, you will quickly begin to hate having to change over attachments.

A power-angle cylinder could be added to that blade and trust me..that's essential.

The other thing that's essential is for you to repair that Hilliard front axle problem if you have not done so already. Having all-wheel drive to push that blade would make a big difference. i would also suggest loading all four tires with beet juice and adding a substantial set of wheel weights and counter-weight. These things are essential in order to find the necessary traction to push a full blade of snow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I did replace the gear box this December. Works pretty good. It seems to be on demand, because it doesn't seem to be engaged all the time. Not sure if there is a short somewhere or what. I will add the quick attach plate sooner than later, but I might hold off on the angle adjustment until next winter. $$$ is a bit tight. It's still cheaper than paying a plow guy though.

I have weights on the back wheels now, but that's it. I have been thinking about making a concrete block to put in the 3 point hitch. Guess I'll have to do that sooner than later.

ArticIngerCase:

It will look better if I did what you have, but I think it will still work OK if I mount it where the bucket went. I have a lot of room to swing around so I imagine it won't be an issue. It will look kinda funny though.

I'm hoping to go get it Thursday. We'll see how it goes. I'll defiantly try it on the bucket first. I may try to find a tap and die set so I can thread the holes and add some bolts to crank it down to the bucket. That way I don't have to drill into my nice bucket.
 

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My opinion is that 80" is probably too big for that tractor. As you suggested in your earlier post it's a lot easier to make one smaller than bigger. I think that 60" would be nice and still cover your wheel track when angled. If you cut the extra off nice and straight, you could make them into bolt on extensions when you need more width. I would also encourage you to follow the suggestions about finding another way to mount it. Mounting anything on the bucket lip is an accident waiting to happen. I have seen a lot of bent buckets. Of all the products that I sell, pallet forks that clamp on the bucket are the only one that I don't recomend (please don't tell my boss). If you do go this route you may consider welding a hook on the top of the bucket and holding them on with a chain and binder. This also transfers some of the load to the top. Gregg
 

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I agree with Tom that it should be mounted in place of the bucket. You won't have any problem pushing the snow but if your blade is too wide and too far in front of the front wheels you'll have trouble keeping make it go in a straight line. If this is to be a seasonal changeover then swapping out the bucket pins isn't too onerous but the quick attach would make sense if you need the bucket during the winter months. If I were you I'd load up the front tires and mount the blade with it's current width. If you find it difficult to control you can always cut it down later without much effort.
 

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Those who have used a blade will understand and likely agree with the following.

There are two ways to use a plow blade to clear snow. The one way is to keep the blade straight so it is like a bulldozer pushing the snow straight ahead in the line of travel. If the machine doing the pushing is heavy enough and is able to find sufficient traction at all times, then the snow will not stop the machine. It will be able to push a full load of snow until the destination for the snow is reached.

That's fine if you want all the snow pushed to that one location but it takes many passes with the tractor to get it all pushed there because the blade will only hold X amount of snow and the rest will fall to either side of the blade during the pass.

The second way is to place the blade on an angle and make successive passes starting in the center of the driveway or parking area to push the snow to either side. If the snow fall is light, this method works well. The snow shifts a little bit sideways with each pass to create what is called a windrow. As the tractor moves the windrow closer and closer to the edge of the area being cleared, the windrow gets larger and larger in size and increasingly difficult to move do to the sheer weight of it.

At some point in this process, you may find that the windrow's weight/size will push your tractor sideways and eventually, you won't be able to move the windrow an inch. This is why those of us who have involved in snow removal for years tell you to add as much weight to your tractor as you can. Most of the time, this is not a horsepower problem. Instead, it's a traction problem and traction problems are directly related to operation weight of the machine. When you cannot angle-blade the snow sideways any more, then you have no choice but to make your blade straight, turn the tractor 90 degrees and bulldoze the snow off to the sides of the area to be cleared. Once you have the bulk of the windrow pushed well off both sides of the area, you may want to angle the blade one more time and make some fast passes in Hi Range to do a final clean up.

Tire choice is also important. "OUR" tractors are not blessed with "Differential Lock" or some sort of traction control differential such as "Posi-trac" or "Detroit Locker" type rear ends. If a rear wheel on our tractors loses grip, the tractor stops dead and that one wheel spins. The best winter set up is turf tires with 2-link tire chains. Yes, ag type bar tread tires will work better than turf tires but neither one will find adequate traction on ice or hard-pack snow.

Studding your tires does help but even that does not work as well as chains. No matter what you have on your tractor for tires, it's the total weight of the tractor that forces those tires against the surface you are driving on. Bottom line, you cannot expect ONE thing to save your ass while dealing with what winter throws at you. This is war and if you want to win the war, you bring out the big guns on day one and overwhelm the enemy. Doing so saves you time and aggravation because it often turns clearing snow into a fun experience instead of a frustrating one. Preparation is 90 percent of the work in darn near everything in life and clearing snow is no different.

The guys on forums who practically beg for snow to come their way are the ones who have prepared their tractors for the task of clearing snow well in advance of the season. They want to meet Mother Nature head on and show her that she's going to have to do better next time if she intends to defeat them. These guys make a game out of it and they are willing to spend the time and the money to outfit their tractors properly for the war games.

I look at it this way. If you didn't come here to win, then why did you bother to come in the first place? Go hire some guy with a 4X4 pick up to plow your drive whenever he finally gets there. If that keeps you housebound, then that's your decision that you will just have to live with. Of course, you can always stare out your picture window with your wife at your side and watch your neighbor blow his driveway clean in a matter of minutes while sitting in the warmth of his cozy cab.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hydrive,

You were right. Traction was an issue! If the rear tires are off the ground traction is not very good.

I got the plow. Drove an hour through the storm, but I got it.

It has a bracket to mount on the bucket. I used some ratchet straps to hold it in place and hooked it up to the plow. It is WAAAAY too forward. It looks ridiculous. After almost crashing into my cars with it, I decided I need more weight as you suggested. I am going to order the quick attach plate and get that welded on. That should move the CG closer to the center, and when I build my concrete weight box I hope that will help too.

Time to search the forums to figure out concrete weight box designs.

I'll strap that bad boy on there one more time for a photo shoot to show how dumb it looks.
 

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Here is a weight box I built.



This bracket allows you to use commonly available 12" sq landscape pavers and they are easy to add or remove since the individual pieces aren't to heavy.
 

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Have you weighed one of those pavers? I think that members should have an idea just how much weight is there. In addition, it does sit back from the rear of the tractor a fair bit so there is also the "leverage factor" at work here.
 

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I haven't weighed them but they're probably about 20 lbs each so the whole set is at least 350 lbs. I have stacked additional ones on top in extreme conditions and have even used some human ballast sitting on the blocks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Bart,

Nice set up. I like that you can change the weight quickly.

I have no welding equipment or experience, think I can make it out of angle iron and brackets I buy at Home Depot or TSC? Could I just bolt the whole thing together?
 

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Why not find a local steel supplier after figuring out how many feet of angle iron you need. Steel is sold in 20 and 24 and 40 foot lengths and it's much cheaper to buy full lengths than those short lengths from TSC or HD.

You could bolt it together using 1/4" bolts and once you are happy with the design, take it to a local welder and pay him for a half hour's time to weld it up for you. Then bring it home, remove the bolts and paint it after cleaning up the welds and steel.

Most steel shops will make one gratis cut in a 20 or 22 foot full length to make it easy for you to transport it. You have to make a plan of what you are building and come up with a "cut list" so you can tell them that you want the 20 foot but you want a 12 and an 8, as an example.

If you have no way to cut the steel, these shops will also custom cut all the pieces for a small fee. Bart can give you the size and thickness of the steel angle he used.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I'll look around and see what I can find. Would 1/8" be suitable? Home Depot has these:

http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1v/R ... ogId=10053

Should I expect to pay less if I buy it in longer lengths? I have a 15A Ryobi compound miter saw, could I cut it with that if I got the right cutting disc? I think I could make all the cuts, and then bring it to someone to weld up?

Thanks for all the help.
 

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Hops_Farmer said:
Bart,

Nice set up. I like that you can change the weight quickly.

I have no welding equipment or experience, think I can make it out of angle iron and brackets I buy at Home Depot or TSC? Could I just bolt the whole thing together?
You've been on this site long enough to know that not having welding equipment is not a valid excuse. :lol: Just as you would find an excuse to buy another tractor, you now have an excuse to buy some welding gear.

If you choose not to follow the above advice then I think you'd be better off seeking out a local welder to put it together. The cost of buying the steel retail so you can do it yourself would probably be more than the cost of having someone weld it up for you from scrap steel. I'm not saying you can't bolt one together but it will be hard to make it really rigid just using bolts unless you put two bolts at every joint. You probably would not be happy if the frame flexed back and forth when full of concrete.

I just noticed Tom's reply while mine was in process but he had some good suggestions. You could probably buy a 24 length of angle iron from a distributor for less than 5 ft from TSC. I'd just print out the photos I posted and take them to a shop and tell them to make one. All they really need to know is the size of the blocks you want to use and where the mounting points for the 3 pt need to be. If I recall correctly I used 3/16" angle for mine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I like the idea of buying my own welder! Maybe I can trade my 16HP propane Kohler for a welder! With absolutely zero experience, what could I expect to trying to weld myself?

I think I'll take your advice, print this out, take it to a metal shop, drop the money, and have someone who knows what they are doing build this. I'll just measure the distance between the 3 point hitch arms to be sure I get it right.
 

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Hops Farmer where are you in Maine? I know I've asked before but I forget.

My local steel guys are 1/2 the price of buying steel at stores like Lowes and TSC. If you need something welded and wanted to drive to me I could do it for you. I'm not the greatest welder ever but it (probably :sidelaugh: ) won't fall apart. :thumbsup:
 

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Welding is not rocket science otherwise there wouldn't be so many people doing it. For most of the kinds of welding we talk about on here it's not terribly complicated to get a strong weld--welding critical components in a nuclear submarine is a different matter. Basic welding equipment doesn't have to be very expensive and if you can find someone to show you the ropes you'll be in business pretty quickly. A lot of areas have technical schools that offer basic welding classes at a very reasonable cost and that will not only help you learn the basics properly but you can learn about what equipment might be best for your purposes. The instructors for such courses are often local welders who can help you pick up some used equipment cheap. Once you learn to weld you'll be amazed at how handy a skill it is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I'll look into some of those adult ed flyers I use to start my fires with next time they show up in the mail. I have often thought it would be a useful skill.

Thanks for all the help gang, but I think I found a solution to my problem. I just talked to a friend of mine who also has a 7020 and he told me he has a weight box that you put concrete blocks in. I told him I have an extra sleeve hitch adapter.

He said he'd bring it to work on Friday.

I still have to weld the quick attach plate onto the plow, but the weight box sounds like it's taken care of!
 
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