Case Colt Ingersoll Tractors banner

1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,052 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here is a few pics of how I did my poor mans power steering mod. Does it help yes, how much, I cant tell you because I replaced all the tie rods at the same time as well as doing a front end alignment. The tractor does steer a LOT easier now though.

Before attempting this mod, please secure the front of your tractor in the air with jackstands. Do not use just a jack.

First step was to remove the snap ring holding the steering spindle on the front axle:


Next, remove the nut that secures the tie rod to the spindle and pull the tie rod up and off the spindle:



Now remove the spindle assembly from the front axle. Your tractor should look like this now:


Here is the parts I used for my mod. I bought them from mscdirect dot com. You will need 2 needle bearings MSC# 03380920. You will need 4 thrust washers MSC#03381092


I placed the bottom factory thrust washer back on the spindle and then, one MSC washer, bearing and washer on the spindle like this and then reinstalled the spindle on the axle:



Once the spindle is in place I then reinstalled the top factory thrust washer and snap ring. You can then reinstall the tie rod assembly and secure everything in place in the reverse order of removal. THe 400 series tractors may use a larger spindle. Measures your first.

Now I took an extra step in this procedure and I highly suggest you do the same IF your zerk fittings are either broke or gunked up. I removed the push in stlye grease fittings and replaced them with threaded ones. This change required me to drill and tap the holes in order to screw the fittings in. This is something you should look into if your fittings are no good. I also suggest cleaning any old grease on the spindle and inside the axle and replacing it with new grease.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
3,185 Posts
Hi Case 220/4,
Looks like a restore job!! Nice!! I do one more step and that is to take a Dremel or a die grinder with a small burring tool and make several small dips into the ID of the upper washer. This will let the pumped in grease at the axle grease fitting flow into the bearing easier. I sometimes jack up the tractor front so the bearing and washers are open somewhat when the spindles slide down a little and grease the spindles.
Bob MacGregor in CT :smile: :geek: :mrgreen:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,648 Posts
Very nice. I'm planning on doing mine in the spring, after looking at this I feel almost as if I've done it once already.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,442 Posts
I'm going to do this to two tractors. But, I would like to find a washer to place on top that has a lip extending down at least below the bearing. Preferably all the way to the spindle. That would help retain grease and prevent at least some of the water and dirt I encounter from entering the grease and bearing.
'
Anyone done a search for such a thing? Any luck finding it?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,373 Posts
Brad, as many times as I have read about this mod, your description and pictures have made the MOST sense to me and I really feel like I understand what all is involved now.

Great pictures and nice work. :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
Bob MacGregor said:
Hi Case 220/4,
Looks like a restore job!! Nice!! I do one more step and that is to take a Dremel or a die grinder with a small burring tool and make several small dips into the ID of the upper washer. This will let the pumped in grease at the axle grease fitting flow into the bearing easier. I sometimes jack up the tractor front so the bearing and washers are open somewhat when the spindles slide down a little and grease the spindles.
Bob MacGregor in CT :smile: :geek: :mrgreen:
And I can tell you this works great! :thumbsup:
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
3,185 Posts
If I had a tractor with PS I still would install PMPS, it would make the load on the PS easier. 400/4000 series tractors use a 1" ID bearing and washers. However!!!! I have yet to find a Wis built 4000 series tractors where the lever arms were welded correctly at 90 degrees to the spindle. If you want to install PMPS you need to remove the spindles and look for a high wear point and it will need to be reworked to remove it or the bearing and washers will crack. I have a file that is rectangular in cross section but it has one smooth side on it and I used it to clean up the high spots on my 4018 spindles. If you have access to a lathe that has a large swing then the areas can be cleaned up easily with minimal lathe setup. My 448 now Tom Goldencoves had the best results of any PMPS that I have installed to date.
Bob MacGregor in CT :thumbsup: :letitsnow: :mrgreen:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
Thanks Brad, I ordered my parts from McMaster (2) # 5909K33 (4) # 5909K46 for $9.86 + tax & shipping
Good little project come spring!

Thanks again
Donkman
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,052 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The part numbers for the bearings and washers for the 400 series tractors is:

McMaster parts

5909K36 1" ID .078" thick 2 required
5909K49 1" ID .032" thick 4 required

another option is to use is:

2855T7 thrust washer, graphite plugged, .125" thick 2 required but no washers are needed.

You might want to check the diamter of the spindle on your tractor. I think the 400 series tractors used a bigger diameter spindle (1" vs. the 3/4" in the 200s). That is why I titled the thread for (200 series)
 
G

·
Kenc said:
I'm going to do this to two tractors. But, I would like to find a washer to place on top that has a lip extending down at least below the bearing. Preferably all the way to the spindle. That would help retain grease and prevent at least some of the water and dirt I encounter from entering the grease and bearing.
'
Anyone done a search for such a thing? Any luck finding it?
I can make you some washers with a shoulder ( lip as you call it) how much is it worth to you ???
GEP :mrgreen:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,648 Posts
GEP said:
I can make you some washers with a shoulder ( lip as you call it) how much is it worth to you ???
GEP :mrgreen:
Seriously, I could see a demand for an upper washer with both the shoulder to help shield the bearing below and the "Mad Mackie Divots" to let the grease in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Scuze the resurrection of this thread, but it did'nt appear to be ready for the archives just yet.

What is the best method for removal of the PUSH IN TYPE of zerk/grease fitting. I noticed that one of the wheels on my 224 was missing the fitting, so I attempted to install one of the fittings I had in stock. It didn't fit, so I decided to remove the fitting from the other wheel to determine thread size and I noticed it didn't have a faceted shoulder. Twisting with a set of channels didn't work, even with a cotter key puller applying pressure on the fitting from the inside out.

I've got dozens of metric fittings in straight and offset, but I'd prefer to keep all the fittings on the tractor the same.

By the way, love the mod. Would love to get as deep into a steering improvement as this;
http://www.data-cut.com/projects/Case448r4.html

........but for now, I just need a running CASE GT!!!!

-Jimbo
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
3,185 Posts
Hi Jimbo,
Get some American sized grease fittings, they have 1/4-28 thread. Get a 1/4-28 tap and tap drill for this size thread, remove the spindles and drill and tap the holes, then install the grease fittings. Clean the metal chips from the axle. Over the years I have had to do this to many Case/Ingersoll tractors and others.
A little known fact about grease gun adapters; There is knurling on the adapter and is there so the user can unscrew but not remove the end to make it easier to connect and disconnect from grease fittings and not pull them out or brake them off. With so many offshore copys of grease fittings found here in the US it has become necessary to loosen the knurled part just to get the grease gun on and off some of these fittings.
Bob MacGregor in CT :446:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,052 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Jimbo, I did exactly what Bob just mentioned in his post. I picked up a handful of zerk fittings from my local NAPA and then just drilled and tapped the hole for the fitting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Bob and Case 220, thanks for the replies. My current problem lies more with removing the PRESSED IN Zerks before tapping the holes to install threaded fittings. I still haven't found a way to remove them without just resorting to cutting them off flush and knocking the remaining stub into the grease channel between the inner and outer bearings.

That sounds like a bit of a hack job repair so if someone has a method they have used successfully for removing those press ins I would be most grateful.

-Jimbo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,052 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Jimbo, If you are having this much trouble with the removal of the pressed in zerk fittings then I suggest you remove the entire front axle and secure it in a bench vise so you can perform a more professional surgery. Have you tried putting a little heat to the surrounding area around the fitting? If not then try that and use a pair of vise grips to twist the fitting around and then see if it pulls out. The axle does NOT need to be cherry red when you heat it. You just a little bit of heat to expand the steel and break the bond it has to the fitting.

If that fails then just carefully cut the fitting off flush and use a punch to knock the remains back inside the axle. The piece should just fall out at that point and then all you need to go is clean the hole and use a number 3 drill bit and then a 1/4-28 tap The drill bit is .2130"

Drill the holes as straight as possible and use tap oil. Start the tap and make a few clockwise rotations with it and then back it out by one half of a rotation. Doing this will break up the steel that is clogging up in the tap. Then just repeat the previous steps until the hole is fully tapped. If the tap feels hard to turn the DO NOT force it. A broken tap in the hole is a lot worse then a stuck fitting. Good luck.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top