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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In the spring I want to add power angle to my plow. I've been thinking about the most common add-on power angle - the single cylinder. I wonder a little about the durability of just one cylinder, and also wonder why couldn't I put a dual cylinder setup on like a full size truck plow runs ?

Anyone been through this exercise in their engineering mind ?

Thoughts ?
 

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A single cylinder is all that's needed. Bart will likely see this thread and chime in with some photos for you. Another option is to just use a linear actuator and skip all the issues that come with hydraulics.
 

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Hydriv said:
A single cylinder is all that's needed. Bart will likely see this thread and chime in with some photos for you. Another option is to just use a linear actuator and skip all the issues that come with hydraulics.
Why do I have to do all the heavy lifting? :sidelaugh:

Here are a couple of photos of power angles done by others.



 

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I have seen someone use a linear actuator on the chute angle (not side to side, but up and down) on a snowcaster before, I think that might be the route I end up taking for the easiest solution to the problem. Less plumbing...
 

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Bart, do you happen to have any pics of how the plumbing is routed and hooked up on those tractors? Members are going to ask where the lines go to and how its controlled
 

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Bart said:
Hydriv said:
A single cylinder is all that's needed. Bart will likely see this thread and chime in with some photos for you. Another option is to just use a linear actuator and skip all the issues that come with hydraulics.
Why do I have to do all the heavy lifting? :sidelaugh:

Here are a couple of photos of power angles done by others.



Thanks for posting my pictures for me Bart. They are both the same snow plow hooked up on 2 different tractors. Starting with the bottom one first, that is on my 4016. I ran the hoses to the PTO but I altered the PTO valve "doors" so as never to give full power to the cylinder. That could be very, very dangerous if the cylinder bottomed out with the full pressure of the PTO behind it. This was the first mod I did to my tractor which was back in 1994 and have used it every winter up to this year without incident. It always worked without any problems.




The First picture is the same snowplow, but it's connected to my articulated tractor. I subscribe to Bart's theory of one implement per tractor, so I picked up a snowcaster for the 4016, and connected the snowplow up to my articulated. I used the "lift" ports of the Travel Control Valve to control it. This is the most preferred method because it has pressure relief so there's no chance of deadheading the cylinder. I would recommend if someone were going to do this modification, that they pick a used TCV with the lift ports and add that TCV in series with the existing TCV on their tractor to control the power angle.

I hope I've covered everything, but if not, someone will let me know.

-scott
 

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CASE 220/4 said:
Bart, do you happen to have any pics of how the plumbing is routed and hooked up on those tractors? Members are going to ask where the lines go to and how its controlled
These are not my projects but Scott has chimed in while I am writing this to explain what he has done to control the cylinder.

Owners have found a variety of places to mount additional valves including under the engine, on the rear fender, on the side of the steering console and under the seat. Probably the cleanest installation involves mounting one or more control levers to the right of the steering console but that requires some careful design and fabrication. Additional hydraulic circuits are a popular enhancement for most who modify their tractors as the added circuits simplify such features as the power blade angle. Probably the cheapest and easiest way to control the cylinder would be to put a tee in the attachment lift cylinder circuit along with a selector valve and then you could angle the blade with the attachment lift lever but then you'd have to switch back and forth between the lift function and the angle function every time you wanted to angle the blade.
 

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[quote="ArticIngerCase] I ran the hoses to the PTO but I altered the PTO valve "doors" so as never to give full power to the cylinder. That could be very, very dangerous if the cylinder bottomed out with the full pressure of the PTO behind it[/quote]

I'd like to amplify Scott's points for anyone planning this mod, in any device that has a hydraulic cylinder the cylinder should be able to move the full length of it's stroke and bottom out before the part being controlled reaches the end of its range of movement. In other words, the plow should be able to swing as far as the cylinder will move it without hitting any stops otherwise the power of the cylinder will likely damage the joint or structure. So, measure carefully before you start welding things together. You can also set the pressure relief lower to avoid overpowering the joints but you never know when someone might "reset" it. A hydraulic cylinder can be deadheaded safely up to the pressure rating of the cylinder so you're not going to blow it apart unless you exceed the design rating.

Aside from the issue of overpower the joint, you want to be careful to limit the flow so that the cylinder doesn't move too quickly as it would if given the full flow of the pump. I'd probably make connections using 1/4" lines as that would limit the flow to the cylinder to a reasonable rate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I prefer to use the tractor's hydraulics, just because I like to utilize the guts of the tractor. However, it seems much more cost effective to just add the electric actuator.

I remember seeing a vid of someone's tractor with this added - anyone know who it was or better yet - what throw and rating the actuator needs to have ?

Thanks guys.
 

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I'm guessing the stroke is a bit long but you should take some careful measurements to figure out both the stroke and overall length before putting any money on the table. The load rating doesn't have to be very high to swing the blade but you want something pretty stout if you are going to be banging the blade into solid objects. I think a hydraulic cylinder would take more shock abuse than most actuators but the cost and simplicity of the actuator is appealing. I don't recall anyone having done this particular mod with an actuator so I'm sure there are others who would be interested in your experience if you go this route.
 

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I might get a little German with my building, but the point is the weight of the tractor banging into the actuator is amplified by the leverage of the blade sticking out past the actuator connection on the blade. Personally I think the actuator with 200 lb load force would be getting abused, the one with 500 lb force would be a better bet. I know you guys won't worry about having a run at the frozen chunk of ice the grader just left at the end of your drive, and how much momentum does your tractor have with you on it?
They have the small sized hydraulic actuators with adjustable relief valves and adjustable flow control that come in up to 4 spool configurations so hooking up valves shouldn't be a problem for all types of implement applications off the same tractor. The hydraulics would take the beating you're going to put it through. you probably wouldn't need a 2" dia cyl for this app.
My 2 cents
My favourite part of this forum cause I can't help chopping' everything. My buddies call my stuff Gorlingized.
Chris
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Well, all I can say is I always over-build it. I can't stand light duty anything, so I have the rest of the winter to decide what to add to it. I don't have a place for working on it during the winter, I'll survive without it this year. But I can assure you that whatever I construct will be bulletproof...........
 

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Here's a hydraulic one.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qla71L44aIQ


I like the idea of a hydraulic one better as it seems sturdier. That and if you're ever stuck up against a snowbank I think the hydraulic would have more power to push you back a bit.
 
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