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Oh, another thing, regular Ethanol gas is 10%% not 15% as you state. Some states have been asking for the move (mainly mid states where the farmers have been pushing for more profits) to 15-20% but 10% right now is the standard. Even there are few car engines that can take the extra ethanol without causing serious internal damage to the engine. If you are buying your gas at the marina most/all sell non ethanol gas!!
 

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So im going to avoid the ethanol issue other than to say it is probably tangentially relevant if the problem is in fact carb icing. 'Pure' gas would change the symptom, but whether one could have enough control over all the other variables to notice the difference, who can say..

But if the problem is carb icing, keep in mind that the boiling or freezing point of liquids changes with pressure. This is the whole reason it would happen in a carb venturi. But the carb is not the only thing that affects pressure in the intake tract. A dirty air filter would cause an incrementally lower pressure through the carb throat at a given airflow. Would that be enough to cause icing at +4f when it didn't used to happen at -10f? Possibly.. and if it was hard to test for it i might not bother, but since it's super easy, why not try just blowing out the filter, see if it ever happens again, if it happens again, pop the filter out and see if it quickly alleviates. If it does replace the filter entirely. If it doesnt, try non-ethanol gas or a gas additive. May be able to just 'cut' normal pump gas with non-ethanol gas if desired. Could also rig a simple fuel-warming circuit.. If you have a fuel pump and aren't concerned about gravity feed, cut a longer piece of fuel hose to the carb and tie up a loop or two where the heated air leaves the engine shrouds. Or a 12v heating pad stuck to your fuel tank. Here's a 25w for $9. Around ~2 amp draw to make 25w on 12-14v.
 

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Virgo, I like your approach and thank you. You have totally missed the point though. The icing is NOT in the tank but the carb! The corrosion occurs in carb also. Mixing ethanol with gas just makes a mixture that effects the aluminum of carbs built before 2005! The mixture causes major carb aluminum failure period!! The first symptoms are always corrosion in the fuel bowl and input solenoids and any jets. Every carb is different just like everyone picks up a virus differently too.
 

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Oh as far as icing. Please forget all the theories.. The gas in the bowl freezes!!! The water/gas mix separates there and never makes it to the venturi at all. Pressure does not even come into the equation but just basic science - below freezing with water in the carb bowl and ice blocking any movement of fuel..
 

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Temperature change happens over time. The warmer the fuel starts, the longer it will take to drop to freezing. That is the idea of warming the fuel in the tank. It just has to get through the carb without freezing. If it was barely freezing before, making it just a BIT warmer to start with should make the problem stop. Plus, you already know you wouldn't need to heat fuel until it's down to single digits outside. If the issue has never happened in the teens or 20s there is no real need to heat fuel under those conditions.

However, since you seem to be saying it is the water in the fuel that causes the problem, it's likely that a fuel additive or non-ethanol gas would cure the issue with no actual 'modification' to the tractor.
 

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Temperature change happens over time. The warmer the fuel starts, the longer it will take to drop to freezing. That is the idea of warming the fuel in the tank. It just has to get through the carb without freezing. If it was barely freezing before, making it just a BIT warmer to start with should make the problem stop. Plus, you already know you wouldn't need to heat fuel until it's down to single digits outside. If the issue has never happened in the teens or 20s there is no real need to heat fuel under those conditions.

However, since you seem to be saying it is the water in the fuel that causes the problem, it's likely that a fuel additive or non-ethanol gas would cure the issue with no actual 'modification' to the tractor.
A carburetor run on zero ethanol rec fuel can still ice up - not due to water in the fuel or the carburetor but due to latent heat of vaporization of the fuel. This is why most carbureted V6 and V8 automotive engines have an exhaust crossover cast into the intake manifold to warm the intake manifold and carburetor to prevent icing of the throttle plates and a stuck throttle situation. I'm sure you've also seen the 70's and 80's snorkel air cleaners with a shroud around one exhaust manifold and a tube ducting heated air to the air cleaner. This is also why snow blower engines have an open window into the air cleaner housing from the cylinder head to allow heat into the carburetor.
 

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Hi FastEddie, all I can say my friend is that your specific engine has an aluminum carb material that is not effected by ethanol and that might be because it was designed as an outboard motor to function in a salt based environment too ?! almost every carb based small engine used on land before 2005-6 has the problem with ethanol gas. It is well known and documented that ethanol gas absorbs water! water freezes below 32 F/0 C and no matter what physics you use that does not change. Ethanol is chemically not compatible with Gas either. From the moment they are mixed together they are trying to separate which is why they only mix during transport and Ethanol absorbs water and freezes. Why do you think that the advise given is NEVER EVER let you gas tank go below 1/4 full during the winter!!!
Oh, another thing, regular Ethanol gas is 10%% not 15% as you state. Some states have been asking for the move (mainly mid states where the farmers have been pushing for more profits) to 15-20% but 10% right now is the standard. Even there are few car engines that can take the extra ethanol without causing serious internal damage to the engine. If you are buying your gas at the marina most/all sell non ethanol gas!!
I've never seen an outboard motor with a pot-metal carburetor and a cork float intended for corrosive environments but regardless, I fuel my 12' rowboat at the gas station like everyone else. It's good general practice, with blended and non-blended gasoline, to store your equipment with a full tank of fuel and fuel in the fuel bowls to prevent varnish from forming. If you are storing your equipment improperly or directly in the elements, you will have carburetor issues with any fuel.

As an engine rebuilder and dyno tech, I can say from personal experience that your claim that modern engines "can't take the extra ethanol without causing serious internal damage to the engine" is not accurate. Nearly all modern vehicles are flex-fuel. Vehicles made since 1996 and prior to FFV's in 2006 were built with ethanol tolerant fuel system materials. I have dyno tested several non-FFV OEM engines on E85 and you can watch the fuel trims change to compensate for the leaner mixture - most have enough capacity to fully compensate, some run out of trim and run slightly lean, but there is absolutely no chance of internal engine damage, period. With all due respect, please stop scaring people with bogus information.
 

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Hi FastEddie, really enjoyed reading your counter claims but we are really talking different things here. An outboard motor is not usually in use during freezing weather! I have had ethanol gas freeze during winter use as I am driving the GT !! Also you really missed the point - ethanol gas causes some aluminum to corrode! Don't take my word for it ! check where refineries load ethanol into the fuel, ask why they don't add it to their storage tanks, then check the internet for ethanol use in small carbonated engines. When you talk "modern engines" these engines started life over 70 years ago!!!!
Don't want to start anything here..
 

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A carburetor run on zero ethanol rec fuel can still ice up - not due to water in the fuel or the carburetor but due to latent heat of vaporization of the fuel. This is why most carbureted V6 and V8 automotive engines have an exhaust crossover cast into the intake manifold to warm the intake manifold and carburetor to prevent icing of the throttle plates and a stuck throttle situation. I'm sure you've also seen the 70's and 80's snorkel air cleaners with a shroud around one exhaust manifold and a tube ducting heated air to the air cleaner. This is also why snow blower engines have an open window into the air cleaner housing from the cylinder head to allow heat into the carburetor.
I just happen to be an ASE Master Tech who teaches automotive at a community college. Before my tractor addiction started i did all this typing on car forums! :D

I am all for whichever approach is easy enough to actually get implemented and consider that the main factor vs which is actually 'most ideal'. I've never even seen a snowblower in real life but i know a lot of them run no air filter, and going back to my earlier comment it's still possible that just replacing or removing a slightly restricted air filter is all that's actually needed here. But heating the intake air, while a good idea, may not stop the water in the fuel from beginning to crystallize into ice in the float bowl, thus my idea of heating the fuel. Heating fuel sounds funny considering it evaporates and boils at such a low temperature to begin with and in the car world we are usually trying to reject heat from both the air and the fuel in order to run more timing, boost etc.. but in below-freezing conditions using a 20w heater, i am just talking about heating the fuel from below freezing, to 'around' freezing or maybe a whole whopping 45 degrees F. Not talking about a whole lot of heat here. Just a little heat pad stuck to the fuel tank.
 

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I just happen to be an ASE Master Tech who teaches automotive at a community college. Before my tractor addiction started i did all this typing on car forums! :D

I am all for whichever approach is easy enough to actually get implemented and consider that the main factor vs which is actually 'most ideal'. I've never even seen a snowblower in real life but i know a lot of them run no air filter, and going back to my earlier comment it's still possible that just replacing or removing a slightly restricted air filter is all that's actually needed here. But heating the intake air, while a good idea, may not stop the water in the fuel from beginning to crystallize into ice in the float bowl, thus my idea of heating the fuel. Heating fuel sounds funny considering it evaporates and boils at such a low temperature to begin with and in the car world we are usually trying to reject heat from both the air and the fuel in order to run more timing, boost etc.. but in below-freezing conditions using a 20w heater, i am just talking about heating the fuel from below freezing, to 'around' freezing or maybe a whole whopping 45 degrees F. Not talking about a whole lot of heat here. Just a little heat pad stuck to the fuel tank.
ASE Master is an awesome credential! Did you work for a particular dealership before teaching? I rebuild and dyno test diesel engines for one of the "big yellow" equipment dealers and often dyno test OEM automotive gas and diesel engines that get installed in industrial applications and engine packages. No certs here but I do miss my teen years at the Ford dealership working with some ASE Master Techs that I found to have a very broad knowledge on anything and everything.

A heat pad attached to the tank could be a good workaround for your situation but the only issue I see is the tank cooling off again after prolonged use at below zero temps. Automotive applications would have return fuel coming back to the tank to maintain the temp above freezing. I've still never seen pump gas with so much water content that it would freeze in a fuel bowl. Typically it freezes inside the venturi where the pressure drop occurs and forms a crusty ice buildup that prevents the throttle plate from closing to the idle position. It's not just snowblowers that use engine heat to prevent icing either - my Stihl MS270 chainsaw has a small plastic plate in the air cleaner housing that you remove for winter use that allows the cooling fan to blow heat from the head into the air cleaner.

I was going to suggest an inline fuel heater from a diesel application but I looked some up and they draw more amperage than the Predator can put out.
 

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Hi FastEddie, really enjoyed reading your counter claims but we are really talking different things here. An outboard motor is not usually in use during freezing weather! I have had ethanol gas freeze during winter use as I am driving the GT !! Also you really missed the point - ethanol gas causes some aluminum to corrode! Don't take my word for it ! check where refineries load ethanol into the fuel, ask why they don't add it to their storage tanks, then check the internet for ethanol use in small carbonated engines. When you talk "modern engines" these engines started life over 70 years ago!!!!
Don't want to start anything here..
Ethanol blended fuel draws moisture and can become acidic to the point that it will corrode aluminum but it takes a long time and is usually a result of neglect. It happens when folks store their equipment outside, leave a fuel tank cap open, or leave a carburetor exposed without an air cleaner for extended periods. Moral of the story, and why I mentioned my 66 year-old outboard motor, if you store your fuel and equipment properly and don't neglect it, you won't have issues with corrosion in the fuel system. Both my Stihl chainsaw and my new Briggs Vanguard I just purchased mention in the literature that they recommend no more than 10% ethanol fuel - not due to corrosion of the parts but due to the jet and air bleed combination of the carburetor. Running higher ethanol content fuel in a carburetor that's not tuned for it causes a lean condition and produces excessive heat.

I live in Michigan and have run lots of equipment, including the Ingersoll, in below zero temps - not once have I had a pump gas slushy in the fuel bowl, tank, lines, or filter. If this happens to you or someone you know in the future, please send me a picture.
 

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Ethanol blended fuel draws moisture and can become acidic to the point that it will corrode aluminum but it takes a long time and is usually a result of neglect. It happens when folks store their equipment outside, leave a fuel tank cap open, or leave a carburetor exposed without an air cleaner for extended periods. Moral of the story, and why I mentioned my 66 year-old outboard motor, if you store your fuel and equipment properly and don't neglect it, you won't have issues with corrosion in the fuel system. Both my Stihl chainsaw and my new Briggs Vanguard I just purchased mention in the literature that they recommend no more than 10% ethanol fuel - not due to corrosion of the parts but due to the jet and air bleed combination of the carburetor. Running higher ethanol content fuel in a carburetor that's not tuned for it causes a lean condition and produces excessive heat.

I live in Michigan and have run lots of equipment, including the Ingersoll, in below zero temps - not once have I had a pump gas slushy in the fuel bowl, tank, lines, or filter. If this happens to you or someone you know in the future, please send me a picture.
Ok, new B&S 18Hp Vanguard engine bought 2010 and installed in a Case 446 for snow blowing use also in 2010 December timeframe. Before the end of January 2011 the engine failed using Ethanol gas (might add New ethanol gas and not some stored). I had to replace the whole carb as it corroded the fuel bulb and solenoid located there! Not theory _fact! Replaced the carb under warranty, changed fuel to non ethanol and still using the same engine now!
 

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I just happen to be an ASE Master Tech who teaches automotive at a community college. Before my tractor addiction started i did all this typing on car forums! :D

I am all for whichever approach is easy enough to actually get implemented and consider that the main factor vs which is actually 'most ideal'. I've never even seen a snowblower in real life but i know a lot of them run no air filter, and going back to my earlier comment it's still possible that just replacing or removing a slightly restricted air filter is all that's actually needed here. But heating the intake air, while a good idea, may not stop the water in the fuel from beginning to crystallize into ice in the float bowl, thus my idea of heating the fuel. Heating fuel sounds funny considering it evaporates and boils at such a low temperature to begin with and in the car world we are usually trying to reject heat from both the air and the fuel in order to run more timing, boost etc.. but in below-freezing conditions using a 20w heater, i am just talking about heating the fuel from below freezing, to 'around' freezing or maybe a whole whopping 45 degrees F. Not talking about a whole lot of heat here. Just a little heat pad stuck to the fuel tank.
Thanks for your comments Vigo. For me, living in WNY where winter snow fall can range from almost nothing (this year so far) to several feet in a short period of time my GT sits under cover in my front yard ready for use. I know from other enthusiasts in my area, some running the opposition green machines, that they do the same. I don't have my GT connected to a power source at all, I expect my GT to turn over and start with little objection (I maintain my equipment to ensure that). I know that if I have the facility to house my GT in say a heated garage that starting would be better but for me not an option, as is connecting up heaters, etc. Lets take this one stage further...I use non-ethanol gas in ALL my small corroborated engines, GT, chain saw, hedge trimmer, leaf blower, etc. I mean EVERTHING summer and winter. They run better, provide more power, start better, etc. There have been so many articles on this very thing for over 20 years now and it seems we are still arguing over it.
 

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Ok, new B&S 18Hp Vanguard engine bought 2010 and installed in a Case 446 for snow blowing use also in 2010 December timeframe. Before the end of January 2011 the engine failed using Ethanol gas (might add New ethanol gas and not some stored). I had to replace the whole carb as it corroded the fuel bulb and solenoid located there! Not theory _fact! Replaced the carb under warranty, changed fuel to non ethanol and still using the same engine now!
I could see a brand new carburetor corroding to the point of replacement after a year if you parked the machine outside and didn't run it at all in that one year timeframe. How was is being stored and were you operating it regularly?

Including vehicles and equipment, I have 13 carburetors to maintain and none of them have rotted out from pump gas, even after long term storage.
 

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I could see a brand new carburetor corroding to the point of replacement after a year if you parked the machine outside and didn't run it at all in that one year timeframe. How was is being stored and were you operating it regularly?

Including vehicles and equipment, I have 13 carburetors to maintain and none of them have rotted out from pump gas, even after long term storage.
Yes, every day from the moment the engine was fitted. At the time I lived in an area that had an elevation of about 2000 ft, and was in the Lake Erie snow band. I would regularly get woken up to 10-24 inches of snow and a 150 drive to clear. The GT was stored inside an unheated garage. I did not store a lot of gas at that time, perhaps a couple of gallons from a local gas station that was well used. Never even gave ethanol gas a thought either. I often filled the tank every day, but at most every two days. After my problem I have changed (we are talking at least 12+ years now) to non ethanol and have Never had a single problem since! I* am also a computer nerd too, any search on the internet will just expand on my analysis.
 

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Did you work for a particular dealership before teaching? I rebuild and dyno test diesel engines for one of the "big yellow" equipment dealers and often dyno test OEM automotive gas and diesel engines that get installed in industrial applications and engine packages.
I myself only worked at independent shops, but i see that as a benefit in terms of seeing a wider variety of stuff. Running a test cell might be a better way to develop certain problem solving skills than to be a regular repair technician anyway because you've probably got your eye on 'variables' a lot, and mostly rely on actual data vs hearsay when forming your opinion about things.:ROFLMAO:

A heat pad attached to the tank could be a good workaround for your situation but the only issue I see is the tank cooling off again after prolonged use at below zero temps. Automotive applications would have return fuel coming back to the tank to maintain the temp above freezing. I've still never seen pump gas with so much water content that it would freeze in a fuel bowl.
I was working off the OP's statement that the tractor always starts and runs fine for ~30 min. That's the number he used but im sure it would depend on a bunch of stuff. Anyway, if you don't need to heat the fuel BEFORE the tractor starts then you can power a small heater from the tractor's charging system and hopefully after 30 (but lets be pessimistic and say 15?) minutes have passed the fuel is sufficiently heated that it will not begin to freeze in the bowl. That was my theory. I've never seen pump gas with so much water content that it would freeze in a fuel bowl either, but i've also never operated a carbureted machine in single digit temps either.. ever, in my life, as a South Texan. Those temps have only occurred twice here in my adult life. :ROFLMAO: I have run a generator in the 20s F, but nothing in single digits lol. So i was just taking him at his word on that part!

I do know or think i know that when ethanol is sufficiently saturated with water it comes 'out of suspension' easier at which point it will settle to the low spot of a system, so it makes sense in my head that the very bottom of the float bowl, which is where fuel is sucked up, would have the highest water concentration and be the most likely to freeze. But that's sitting still! I would assume that with the float/needle valve dribbling in fuel and the natural movement of the tractor that the fuel is agitated enough to be 'uniform'. So i am not really sure why fuel would freeze in the bowl but not in the venturi.

Bmull1986, can you elaborate on what you saw??
 

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I myself only worked at independent shops, but i see that as a benefit in terms of seeing a wider variety of stuff. Running a test cell might be a better way to develop certain problem solving skills than to be a regular repair technician anyway because you've probably got your eye on 'variables' a lot, and mostly rely on actual data vs hearsay when forming your opinion about things.:ROFLMAO:

I was working off the OP's statement that the tractor always starts and runs fine for ~30 min. That's the number he used but im sure it would depend on a bunch of stuff. Anyway, if you don't need to heat the fuel BEFORE the tractor starts then you can power a small heater from the tractor's charging system and hopefully after 30 (but lets be pessimistic and say 15?) minutes have passed the fuel is sufficiently heated that it will not begin to freeze in the bowl. That was my theory. I've never seen pump gas with so much water content that it would freeze in a fuel bowl either, but i've also never operated a carbureted machine in single digit temps either.. ever, in my life, as a South Texan. Those temps have only occurred twice here in my adult life. :ROFLMAO: I have run a generator in the 20s F, but nothing in single digits lol. So i was just taking him at his word on that part!

I do know or think i know that when ethanol is sufficiently saturated with water it comes 'out of suspension' easier at which point it will settle to the low spot of a system, so it makes sense in my head that the very bottom of the float bowl, which is where fuel is sucked up, would have the highest water concentration and be the most likely to freeze. But that's sitting still! I would assume that with the float/needle valve dribbling in fuel and the natural movement of the tractor that the fuel is agitated enough to be 'uniform'. So i am not really sure why fuel would freeze in the bowl but not in the venturi.

Bmull1986, can you elaborate on what you saw??
I'm jealous of your Texas weather right now! Variety is the spice of life but God bless you for accumulating and retaining the knowledge to service all the various makes and models. The dyno can be repetitive some days but I've learned a lot from troubleshooting with the veteran guys and working with engineers that design and package the engines.

I'm a dummy, I forgot you're not the OP. He will have a problem running a heating element capable of doing the job with the Predator engine as the charging system in those only puts out 2-3 amps. He could swap to a Honda GX flywheel with more magnets for 10 amps but they cost about half of the engine's on-sale price. Hopefully he comes back with a better description.
 

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If he is trying to run lights as well you are probably right. However, Watts Law is W = V x A and ~13v x 3a = ~39w, almost 40w. I was only suggesting to run a 20w heater. But i am not saying it's 'guaranteed to work'! I just tried to give a plausible option that wasn't guaranteed to fail. 😂
 

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If I may offer some in the box - out of the box thoughts ....

Before the advent of carbs with electronic shut-off valves (SOV), running the a machine in winter worked best the next time by having a manual fuel SOV near the carb and letting the machine "run dry." Keeping the tank filled till the next use as well. Starting the next time with a dry carb bowl - of course opening the SOV and waiting a moment for fuel flow.

As for carb icing while the machine is in use, this will require a bit of effort/fabrication. As noted, tank heating ideas would have too much e-power draw.

Option one: There are heating elements for chainsaw handles out there. I have one saw and it comes in handy. It is switch operated and gets quite hot quickly. There is a small stater on the flywheel, so I do not believe much juice is needed. (AC source) I believe? This element comes in the form of a "tape" w/wire leads. Why? Ok, so I looked at an internet picture of the Predator 670 for reference. The cooling tin directs engine heat away from the intake side. I"ll call it a modern engine. Interesting fuel lines and such, so uhm, replacing part of the fuel line with copper or aluminum tubing as a heat sink and attaching the heating element to it would essentially provide you with a low e-draw fuel heater. A dash mounted switch and some trial and error R&D would offer a "fuel heater" and prevent icing. Mount a 5 0r 7.5 amp fuse in-line for good measure. A possible problem with too much heat in the fuel would be the an issue with vapor lock from vaporized fuel. There is no chance of electrical arcing as long as wires are insulated. Where to get? Amazon or the Stihl dealer. Humph ......

Option two: The carb "aluminum", bowl may be steel, is mounted via bolts through a rubber/plastic manifold. Heat from the heads being insulated from the carb. For various reasons, it is a good thing. Since aluminum is the least expensive yet best conductor of heat, even better than copper, using aluminum wire as a conductor of heat - taken from the cylinder head (wrapped inside the fins in some way avoiding too much air flow loss) and routed to the carb - wrapped around the carb body and/or float - insulating the wire if needed-when needed, would prove a heating element to the carb preventing the icing situation.

Option three: Like in option one where part of the rubber fuel line is replaced with metal tubing and utilizing option two's use of aluminum wire as the heat sink from the cylinder head(CH), a heating element is created warming fuel entering the carb. Yes, this needs a bit of R&D as well so as to get enough heat or avoid too much heat. Starting with a length of wire wrapped around the CH and while the engine is running, bare handed holding the wire and gauging how much CH wrap and length of wire will be needed and where insulation on the wire will be needed. As for the new section of metal fuel line, determining how much wire will be needed for the heating element is the first thing to solve. It'a ball-park - by hand or thermometer of your choice measurement. It may be a short, straight length or a small coiled length of tubing. To be determined by you, of course - avoiding vapor lock.

Ideas of where to get the tubing? I would try a big box home center or a very well stocked old time-y hardware store. The aluminum wire will be found there as well in the electrical supply section where off-the-roll 0 gauge or 2 gauge wire can be bought by the foot. Or a coil length of 8 or 10 gauge wire may be found where length rope is on the rack.
Insulation may be a bit trickier because it will need to be wrapped in close working quarters. Try the first aid section. Silk bandage tape (not paper tape) is a good insulator. I have used it to replace the covering on the armature of the starter/generator on older tractors. Or possibly exhaust wrap (expensive)? Insulation may even not be needed. (?)
I would think this "heating element" is best mounted aft of the fuel pump. Where is the fuel pump?

This is all simply an offering of ideas. The end result may look the child no one knows about because it's never let out of the house because it might scare the neighbors or could be hidden nicely and be the envy of who ever.
(y)Keep the peace. :)
 

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If I may offer some in the box - out of the box thoughts ....

Before the advent of carbs with electronic shut-off valves (SOV), running the a machine in winter worked best the next time by having a manual fuel SOV near the carb and letting the machine "run dry." Keeping the tank filled till the next use as well. Starting the next time with a dry carb bowl - of course opening the SOV and waiting a moment for fuel flow.

As for carb icing while the machine is in use, this will require a bit of effort/fabrication. As noted, tank heating ideas would have too much e-power draw.

Option one: There are heating elements for chainsaw handles out there. I have one saw and it comes in handy. It is switch operated and gets quite hot quickly. There is a small stater on the flywheel, so I do not believe much juice is needed. (AC source) I believe? This element comes in the form of a "tape" w/wire leads. Why? Ok, so I looked at an internet picture of the Predator 670 for reference. The cooling tin directs engine heat away from the intake side. I"ll call it a modern engine. Interesting fuel lines and such, so uhm, replacing part of the fuel line with copper or aluminum tubing as a heat sink and attaching the heating element to it would essentially provide you with a low e-draw fuel heater. A dash mounted switch and some trial and error R&D would offer a "fuel heater" and prevent icing. Mount a 5 0r 7.5 amp fuse in-line for good measure. A possible problem with too much heat in the fuel would be the an issue with vapor lock from vaporized fuel. There is no chance of electrical arcing as long as wires are insulated. Where to get? Amazon or the Stihl dealer. Humph ......

Option two: The carb "aluminum", bowl may be steel, is mounted via bolts through a rubber/plastic manifold. Heat from the heads being insulated from the carb. For various reasons, it is a good thing. Since aluminum is the least expensive yet best conductor of heat, even better than copper, using aluminum wire as a conductor of heat - taken from the cylinder head (wrapped inside the fins in some way avoiding too much air flow loss) and routed to the carb - wrapped around the carb body and/or float - insulating the wire if needed-when needed, would prove a heating element to the carb preventing the icing situation.

Option three: Like in option one where part of the rubber fuel line is replaced with metal tubing and utilizing option two's use of aluminum wire as the heat sink from the cylinder head(CH), a heating element is created warming fuel entering the carb. Yes, this needs a bit of R&D as well so as to get enough heat or avoid too much heat. Starting with a length of wire wrapped around the CH and while the engine is running, bare handed holding the wire and gauging how much CH wrap and length of wire will be needed and where insulation on the wire will be needed. As for the new section of metal fuel line, determining how much wire will be needed for the heating element is the first thing to solve. It'a ball-park - by hand or thermometer of your choice measurement. It may be a short, straight length or a small coiled length of tubing. To be determined by you, of course - avoiding vapor lock.

Ideas of where to get the tubing? I would try a big box home center or a very well stocked old time-y hardware store. The aluminum wire will be found there as well in the electrical supply section where off-the-roll 0 gauge or 2 gauge wire can be bought by the foot. Or a coil length of 8 or 10 gauge wire may be found where length rope is on the rack.
Insulation may be a bit trickier because it will need to be wrapped in close working quarters. Try the first aid section. Silk bandage tape (not paper tape) is a good insulator. I have used it to replace the covering on the armature of the starter/generator on older tractors. Or possibly exhaust wrap (expensive)? Insulation may even not be needed. (?)
I would think this "heating element" is best mounted aft of the fuel pump. Where is the fuel pump?

This is all simply an offering of ideas. The end result may look the child no one knows about because it's never let out of the house because it might scare the neighbors or could be hidden nicely and be the envy of who ever.
(y)Keep the peace. :)
No offence, but that is way over complicated. Like others have mentioned hot air risers on the air cleaner snorkel of old cars, my Dads AC 912 came with a air filter cover with a elbow tube on it, that could be set in a hole in the cover over one of the exhaust manifolds. If he is having icing problems after 30 minutes of runtime this should be enough to fix the problem.

Cheers,
Gordy
 
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