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Have any of you tried to fix a cracked and broken steering wheel before I have been looking for one for over a year with no luck so think i might just try and fix mine I have the big piece that broke off so it would just be to fill the cracks in with a good material and get the whole thing painted the correct color? Any advice on what to do or if someone knows where there is one that is not both arms and a leg to buy thanks
 

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Which type do you have? Mine had the keyway type and was frozen to the steering shaft. I ended up having to buy a pin type steering shaft from Brian, and a used wheel from Joes outdoor power. The wheel that i got looks brand new, and i think i paid about 60 bucks for it.
 

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you know i am not to sure i didn't want to take it off until i knew I could get something back on there. did they use 2 types on the 1965 130's
 

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The Case 130 and 180 parts manual only shows one wheel for these tractors. Part Number is 70058. It is no longer available.

There is a replacement wheel for Oliver tractors that is a close match for appearance but will need some fiddling to fit on to your 130. I bought one.

It can be found here:
http://stores.agpartsfirst.com/Detail.bok?no=169

The spline is 11/16" instead of 3/4". The hole must be slightly enlarged and the teeth must be massaged with a three sided file for it to work with the steering shaft on the 130.

Steve Guider provided the above info to me over the phone. He has restored a number of Case Garden Tractors to include 130s and has used this wheel.
Here is a link to some pics of his garden tractors: http://www.mytractorforum.com/showthread.php?t=164035

Another way to fix your steering wheel would be to repair it. I repaired the wheel on my 8N several years ago with a two part epoxy putty and black Plasticoat both sourced from Lowes. That might work for you as well.

Eastwood offers steering wheel repair kits: http://search.eastwood.com/search?w=steering+wheel&p=Q&ts=custom

Dan
 

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Yes ,I have fixed them before using epoxy .Then once it is sanded to the right shape,I use epoxy primer ,and finally the right color.I also top that with clear coat so as not to wear through the color too quickly.It makes for a nice fix.
 

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The Eastwood kit includes a two part epoxy paste called PC7. It is available locally at ACE Hardware at a much reduced rate than the Kit. It works excellent. I used it on a cracked 8N wheel. Clean-fill-sand-polish and it looks great. A bonus is that when mixed it is Black. I have a number of cracked wheels which will be getting the treatment before long. I will take before and after pictures.
 

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Brian and Tom are both helpful Ingersoll dealers, for sure, but that wheel has been discontinued for a long, long time. Is it possible for one to be laying in a heap of dust on some old-timey Case dealer's parts shelf? Sure. But since there's no system in place that tracks inventory held by dealers, there's no way for Brian or Tom to use a computer to track it down.

Therefore, I suggest that you take Jack's advice and some others and repair the wheel you have. Removing it is dicey and should be done with extreme care.
 

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Tom, I'd have to say I agree with you. The wheel on my 190 was too far gone to save, so I had to remove it, and it pretty much disintegrated during the process. I'll probably use the Oliver wheel, Steve mentioned that one to me too. Only problem is, it resembles the flat wheel used on the early production tractors and is no match for my stock wheel with the raised finger grips.
John
 

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JBWeld works good for cracks and glueing missing pieces back on. It's a fairly low viscosity and flows into cracks well. PC7 is thick and is good for replacing missing areas. When finished sand to shape and remove scratches etc. Then, for best durability, prime with a good epoxy primer and paint with a urethane paint from you local autobody supply. Regular black enamel with hardener will work too.

Hundreds of vintage car and truck wheels are done every year and I've never heard on one breaking in use.
 
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