Case Colt Ingersoll Tractors banner
101 - 105 of 105 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
333 Posts
Drawings would be appreciated. Looks like the front exit muffler is discontinued but still available in a few places. I recall there was a mud motor company that made a performance muffler.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
327 Posts
I am impressed with how quick this project took you. It took me 2 months to re build my card, adjust valves and paint my tractor. You took 3 weeks to investigate, purchase and assemble a entire engine swap and test it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
177 Posts
Discussion Starter · #103 ·
Looks great.
What’s the total cost estimate?
Would you do it again
What would you do differently?
I am impressed with how quick this project took you. It took me 2 months to re build my card, adjust valves and paint my tractor. You took 3 weeks to investigate, purchase and assemble a entire engine swap and test it.
Total on this swap was around $2200 after tax and shipping. I'll post up a full breakdown with part numbers and prices soon.

I would definitely do it again. The cost of the repower is cheaper than a new equivalent tractor and the extra power will be helpful for what I do around my property. This tractor is also my only means for clearing snow and cutting the grass so the peace of mind knowing it will be reliable is worth it to me.

The only thing I would have done differently is fabricating my own clutch anti-rotation bracket. I paid $65 for a new one and ended up cutting it up and rewelding it together to make it fit. I could have fabbed my own in an hour from a $5 length of steel and been all set.

I was fortunate to have the use of my dad's heated shop and fab tools and the welding and fabricating expertise of my dad and little brother. My brother banged out all of the fab work while I was setting up the engine and clutch so it went fast. It took three weeks start to finish but I spent the first week waiting for parts and the rest was mostly two Saturdays. I had to get this project done in a hurry because I was a sitting duck without a tractor just waiting the get a good Michigan snow dumped on me. If I had a spare tractor I would probably still be working on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
177 Posts
Discussion Starter · #104 ·
Here's the total cost and part number breakdown:

From Small Engine Warehouse:

P/N 386447-0463 - 23HP Vanguard, 1-1/8" x 3" shaft - $1449 + $84 S&H

P/N MUF0460 - 21-23HP Vanguard Muffler - $89

From XtremeOPE:

P/N 0153 - Ingersoll C47447 equivalent clutch - $300.95 w/free S&H

From the Ingersoll dealer:

P/N C33200 - Clutch washer - $19.25

P/N C48775 - Clutch cup washer - $10.50

From the hardware store:

7/16" x 20 x 1-1/2" clutch bolt and lock washer, M8 flywheel adapter bolts, misc hardware and materials - $10

Grand Total: $1962.70

*My total ended up being more than this after I bought the clutch anti-rotation bracket (P/N C48772, $65) that didn't fit and the flywheel adapter (SEW P/N JD318B-FLY-BV, $89) that I modified to work. The clutch bracket could be fabricated for a few bucks if you have a welder and a cutoff wheel and any local machinist could make the crank pilot and flywheel adapter for less than $100 in labor and material.


Summary of modifications required:

Machine a crank pilot button and flywheel adapter.

Remove the blower housing, install the crank pilot and flywheel adapter, and reassemble.

Install the CW clutch with the pulley against the crankcase.

Slot the debris screen and cutout a center hole for the pump coupler.

Drill new engine mounting holes in the frame.

Fabricate a clutch anti-rotation bracket and secure to the bottom of the frame rail through the front engine mounting bolts (requires two longer bolts).

Raise the hood 1-1/4" to clear the engine air cleaner housing.

Remove the hood side shields and discard.

Clearance the hood heat shield until it clears the air cleaner housing and engine lifting bracket and fabricate ears to support the shield from the upper studs inside the hood.

Modify the muffler outlet per your liking. If you can get the exhaust out without cutting the hood, you have my respect.

Fabricate a cowl extension from the front of the hydraulic tank to the engine blower housing to maintain airflow through the hydraulic oil cooler.


In conclusion:

You could save money by buying this engine with the 1-29/32" shaft and using your original 4016 clutch, eliminating the need to fabricate a flywheel adapter, an anti-rotation bracket, buying a new CW clutch, and drilling new holes in the frame but this will require swapping your old flywheel and blower housing to the new engine. I chose not to do this because Briggs and Stratton made changes to the flywheel, cooling fan, and blower housing to prevent the cylinder head overheating issues that these engines are known to have. The CW clutch is the whole key to making this swap possible and keeping the new engine's cooling updates by allowing the engine to shift forward in the frame while keeping the original belt alignment. This makes room at the flywheel end for the deeper blower housing to clear the hydraulic pump arm and hydraulic tank. The flywheel adapter just takes up the extra distance between the pump coupler face and flywheel face after moving the engine forward.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
177 Posts
Discussion Starter · #105 ·
Drawings would be appreciated. Looks like the front exit muffler is discontinued but still available in a few places. I recall there was a mud motor company that made a performance muffler.
10-4, I'm working on some halfway decent drawings. What I have right now is worse than a napkin sketch :sneaky:(n)

Mufflers are a crap chute. They don't post dimensions for most of them and for how much they cost, trial-and-error ordering and returning isn't an option.

You are correct, there are performance stainless mufflers for the mud motor guys and they look sweet and sound good but they are expensive. It's also hard to distinguish which ones will be sufficiently quiet and which ones will make your tractor sound like a Harley with drag pipes.
 
101 - 105 of 105 Posts
Top