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· Ingersoll Dealer
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I don't think I have seen these tools mentioned on the forum before ... so here is a little info.

This is a very useful tool for thread REPAIR, not new threads. Compact in comparison to typical thread dies and nice for chasing a damaged thread in place ... think a hard to remove stud or hydraulic fitting.




The pack listed above is SAE FINE, which is useful on hydraulic fittings on the Case/Ingersoll tractors. Coarse and metric are available, also, of course. No specific endorsement of the vendor shown, but I prefer to link a comparative small business ...



Why am I thinking about it, you ask yourself ... ?

Those of you with experience servicing the power steering hydraulic lines know this can be a routine job ... that can easily turn in to a good dose of frustration ... or worse ...

On a zero F start at XMas, my 4223PS chose to sacrifice one of the P/S hoses, which had accumulated some casing damage over the years. Bummer, but I can work on it in the heated shop and there was a warming trend after XMAS.

Well ... it was the LH forward hose (return oil to the TCV), which generally requires removing at least 2 of the others. Note to self ... go ahead and remove the tower return hoses and change the oil while doing so. Consider replacing them all while you are there.

Now, for those of you specifically experienced in P/S service, you know further the gut response when you realize you may have fouled one of the threads on the P/S controller fitting ... these fittings are effectively not replaceable.

Yep ... I do tend to be pretty skilled at wrenching and sensing what's not right ... but in the drippy, oily moment of reinstalling the feed hose from the P/S flow divider block, I reached for the wrench before I ran the fitting all the way up by finger. Wasn't started as far as I thought ...

So, now my P/S controller has neatly reformed threads, which was easy to do with a rethreading die. There is sufficient clearance in the tractor, simply with a dose of patience and a ratcheting socket. Could never be done with a standard size threading die.

I did end up pulling the tower hoses and doing an oil change while I was at it ... that improved the access greatly.

And ... for those wondering ... yes the under chassis P/S hoses are an extra special pleasure to change on a 4200 series tractor with foot control hardware in the way ... lots of patience recommended and 1/8 rotation turns on the fittings.


Hope this helps someone along the way, on whatever related project you are facing.


Brian
 

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1993 Ingersoll 4118, 1984 Case 448
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275 Posts
Do not feel alone Brian, last summer while replacing the hoses on my 4118 I damaged the 37° JIC face on the inlet fitting on my power steering unit. While removing one of the other fittings with an open end wrench the back side of the wrench marred the face of the inlet fitting.

This seems like an appropriate place to add this for anyone working on their power steering:
1. Be patient and careful - there's not much room to work in there but it's not impossible.
2. Buy or make a fitting wrench.

I tried these Flaretite to start with, but the damage was to severe to seal.
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I found this small diamond hone from Koul tools online and it worked well.
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I was able to get it through a hole in the cross between the where the travel control and lift levers attach.
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With a 12" drill extension I was able to clean up the fitting without removing the steering unit from the tractor.
I then used one of the Flaretite gaskets.
 

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I don't think I have seen these tools mentioned on the forum before ... so here is a little info.

This is a very useful tool for thread REPAIR, not new threads. Compact in comparison to typical thread dies and nice for chasing a damaged thread in place ... think a hard to remove stud or hydraulic fitting.




The pack listed above is SAE FINE, which is useful on hydraulic fittings on the Case/Ingersoll tractors. Coarse and metric are available, also, of course. No specific endorsement of the vendor shown, but I prefer to link a comparative small business ...



Why am I thinking about it, you ask yourself ... ?

Those of you with experience servicing the power steering hydraulic lines know this can be a routine job ... that can easily turn in to a good dose of frustration ... or worse ...

On a zero F start at XMas, my 4223PS chose to sacrifice one of the P/S hoses, which had accumulated some casing damage over the years. Bummer, but I can work on it in the heated shop and there was a warming trend after XMAS.

Well ... it was the LH forward hose (return oil to the TCV), which generally requires removing at least 2 of the others. Note to self ... go ahead and remove the tower return hoses and change the oil while doing so. Consider replacing them all while you are there.

Now, for those of you specifically experienced in P/S service, you know further the gut response when you realize you may have fouled one of the threads on the P/S controller fitting ... these fittings are effectively not replaceable.

Yep ... I do tend to be pretty skilled at wrenching and sensing what's not right ... but in the drippy, oily moment of reinstalling the feed hose from the P/S flow divider block, I reached for the wrench before I ran the fitting all the way up by finger. Wasn't started as far as I thought ...

So, now my P/S controller has neatly reformed threads, which was easy to do with a rethreading die. There is sufficient clearance in the tractor, simply with a dose of patience and a ratcheting socket. Could never be done with a standard size threading die.

I did end up pulling the tower hoses and doing an oil change while I was at it ... that improved the access greatly.

And ... for those wondering ... yes the under chassis P/S hoses are an extra special pleasure to change on a 4200 series tractor with foot control hardware in the way ... lots of patience recommended and 1/8 rotation turns on the fittings.


Hope this helps someone along the way, on whatever related project you are facing.


Brian
It's one of those tools that don't get used much, but handy as hell when you need it. Back in my younger days I was on a Snap On fixation, and bought one of their sets. It is coarse and fine thread, aslo external and internal chasers. Hard to recall but i think the set was $250 35 years ago. I also find the thread chasing files come in handy from time to time.


Cheers,
Gordy
 

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Years ago, I bought one of rethreading sets from craftsman and just a warning, be really careful where you put them after using them as you may pick it up and use it for a nut. I know for almost a fact that my 1/4" went that route. :(:rolleyes::cry:
 

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Here is a pretty comprehensive kit.


I do not own one, and confess I have used standard taps and dies to "fix" threads, which is not the best thing to do.
 

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I have an axle thread repairing tool, which clamps a single die around a shaft and cleans/recuts the threads on it as you spin it.

But for something smaller like a JIC fitting, I'm not sure I know the difference between a cutting die and a chaser die. Either way you're needing to clean up the thread form, and either way it's the top/first thread that's the key. The very first thread ridge gets bent/folded over to one side and the thread of the nut then gets directed into the wrong groove. It's a bit like a railroad track switch that intercepts the ridge of the train wheel and cuts it over to one side.

I've cross-threaded the JIC 10 on my travel motor before, and to get the nut to go back on straight I had to carefully file off the lead-in of the thread ridge on the JIC 10 male fitting, just the very beginning of it, just the part that was folded over to the side. Once that part stopped mis-directing the nut's thread ridge, then it all worked OK again.

If you just blindly run a threading/chasing die on there, I'd think you have to be careful: If the leading thread ridge of the die/chaser is off on the wrong thread groove, then it'll re-cut a full series of threads that are cocked a few degrees off of center. The JIC nut would be able to screw on ok, but it'll be cocked, and it won't produce even pressure around the rim of the cone, so you won't get a good seal.

So from my standpoint, I wouldn't consider a threading/chasing die to be an "automatic" silver bullet. I'd say to go ahead and use one, be be sure you deal with that first bent/folded thread ridge before you run the die/chaser on there.

And if you have fixed the first bent/folded thread ridge, then you may not need the die/chaser at all.

Bob
 

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I have always kept taps and dies as part of my tools kit. I not only use them to creat new threds for projects but also to re-thread or even clean old threads too. I agree the thread kits need to be part of anyone's toolkit though and not some special item. Way too easy to damage a thread, even lightly during assembly and requires a "touch" to just everything to fit just right.
 

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Somebody mentioned the thread files in that chaser set but i actually think those are a tool a lot of people don't know the value of or don't know they exist..

Another thing about rethreading dies.. if one is looking to buy a single die online and notice some dies a lot cheaper than others in the same size, be careful you don't end up with a rethreading die when you were looking for a thread cutting die. Depending on where you buy from that info may be obvious or you may have to read carefully.
 
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