Case Colt Ingersoll Tractors banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
284 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone ever try it to extend the life of a muffler. Products such as Corroseal converts rust to an inert substance so I would expect it should be okay. As I am installing my freshly rebuilt K321 I am cleaning things up. My 1989 muffler is still good, but certainly crusty on the outside. I was thinking I could pour some inside and shake it around as well. It may help extend life. Anyone know if these products are not appropriate for high heat items?
 

·
Administrator
1973 Case 444, 1974 Case 644, 1976 Case 446, 1977 Case 646
Joined
·
2,578 Posts
I used some high heat header paint on my 644lbh exhaust. It lasted a few years and now it's starting to rust again.

Keep the Peace
Harry
 

·
Administrator
1973 Case 444, 1974 Case 644, 1976 Case 446, 1977 Case 646
Joined
·
2,578 Posts
Yes that's the high heat paint that I have used before. I've tried a variety of rust converter paint before even on non high heat situation and have not been entirely happy with the results.

Keep the Peace
Harry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
284 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes that's the high heat paint that I have used before. I've tried a variety of rust converter paint before even on non high heat situation and have not been entirely happy with the results.

Keep the Peace
Harry
Thinking more, probably a waste of time and material. Rust converters do need a surface paint to avoid future rusting. Sure I could rust convert and use header paint on the outside, but the muffler would still rust from the inside given that's where so much moisture goes as a product of combustion.
 

·
Administrator
1973 Case 444, 1974 Case 644, 1976 Case 446, 1977 Case 646
Joined
·
2,578 Posts
I repaired a mowing deck for my son in law two years ago. The idler pulley needed to be fixed and a few cracks in the deck. I used the rust reformer then a black truck bed paint over that. The deck returned last week for round two of repairing. The deck held up good with no new cracks but the other idler pulley needed some attention. It surprised me how the rust reformer paint had peeled off and was rusted again. This time I'm sand blasting the deck before painting.

Keep the Peace
Harry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
284 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You forgot heat. Mufflers generally don';t rust on the inside.
I was thinking of the moisture I see when I start my '66 Mustang. Perhaps that is because it is cold at that time and it has a much longer path down a cold pipe to condensate. Perhaps when hot at shutdown it is dry. (y)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
you would be better off soad blasting it and have a pro use the correct exhaust paint... this ensures that the paint has a good surface to stick to and all rust is gone. i work in a exhaust factory we used to make onan Kohler and brig's probably the rest of I cares to do the digging mufflers.. do it right the first time and it will last another 25-30 years provide it's taken care of. another thing is is it just the outer heat shel and insulation?. I did a 446 muffler at work the outer shell was toast but the muffler was still good. I shot blasted that one and had it washed and painted. sold it to someone so I can't tell you what its like now.


(we soda blast at work) it's shipped out then returned to paint.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Anyone ever try it to extend the life of a muffler. Products such as Corroseal converts rust to an inert substance so I would expect it should be okay. As I am installing my freshly rebuilt K321 I am cleaning things up. My 1989 muffler is still good, but certainly crusty on the outside. I was thinking I could pour some inside and shake it around as well. It may help extend life. Anyone know if these products are not appropriate for high heat items?
Way back when i got my first snowmobiles a guy told me to spray my expansion chambers with non stick cooking spray and then run it to bake it on to preserve them. I thought he was crazy. He was not! Cant see why it would not work on a muffler.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
674 Posts
I was thinking of the moisture I see when I start my '66 Mustang. Perhaps that is because it is cold at that time and it has a much longer path down a cold pipe to condensate. Perhaps when hot at shutdown it is dry. (y)
I remember my old auto shop teacher from 50 some years ago. Mr Schulz was a real character, he would scavenge paper towels from the garbage cans and hang them up to dry for us to reuse! Anyways, one of our projects was retrofitting a Cummins 6 cyl diesel into his mid '50's Oddmobile, he insisted that we braze in a greasefitting into the exhaust header pipe as he swore it was a common practise back where he was from and that it greatly extended the life of the system. I am not sure of that but certainly he was convinced.
 

·
Administrator
1973 Case 444, 1974 Case 644, 1976 Case 446, 1977 Case 646
Joined
·
2,578 Posts
I remember my old auto shop teacher from 50 some years ago. Mr Schulz was a real character, he would scavenge paper towels from the garbage cans and hang them up to dry for us to reuse! Anyways, one of our projects was retrofitting a Cummins 6 cyl diesel into his mid '50's Oddmobile, he insisted that we braze in a greasefitting into the exhaust header pipe as he swore it was a common practise back where he was from and that it greatly extended the life of the system. I am not sure of that but certainly he was convinced.
So the zerk fitting was to grease the exhaust manifold?

Keep the Peace
Harry
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
674 Posts
No, it was brazed into the lower bend of the header pipe with the idea that the hot exhaust gases would carry the grease thru-out the pipes and muffler
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I just repaired the muffler on our 1978 446 a few weeks ago. The right outer end cap crimp tabs have rusted off and I don't think the shell material is thick enough to weld. Used an old 6 inch diameter steel coffee can and cut a 1 inch wide slot down the side to slide over the right exhaust pipe. Painted hi-temp flat black and used three 6 inch stainless hose clamps to hold it on. Put some red silicone sealer around the old end seam before sliding the can on. The bottom of the coffee can makes it look like a factory made part with the hood closed and now is as quiet as it was before the rust out. Hope it's good for another 40+ years - ha ha. Dishware Cookware and bakeware Tableware Serveware Audio equipment
Automotive tire Motor vehicle Tire Wood Automotive exterior
Automotive tire Bumper Automotive exterior Automotive wheel system Gas
Hood Automotive tire Automotive lighting Vehicle door Bumper
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
4,370 Posts
I just repaired the muffler on our 1978 446 a few weeks ago. The right outer end cap crimp tabs have rusted off and I don't think the shell material is thick enough to weld. Used an old 6 inch diameter steel coffee can and cut a 1 inch wide slot down the side to slide over the right exhaust pipe. Painted hi-temp flat black and used three 6 inch stainless hose clamps to hold it on. Put some red silicone sealer around the old end seam before sliding the can on. The bottom of the coffee can makes it look like a factory made part with the hood closed and now is as quiet as it was before the rust out. Hope it's good for another 40+ years - ha ha. View attachment 126746 View attachment 126747 View attachment 126748 View attachment 126749
VERY well done!!!! Especially considering the huge cost lol, Looks almost factory and the paint on the hood will thank you!
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top