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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone,

I picked up a 4016 with the sleeve hitch and rototiller. It is my first one and I really enjoy the tractor and am fixing up a bunch of miscellaneous things. All of the documentation and manuals are straight forward except I have one question. Which hole of the lift extension plate should the arm for the sleeve hitch go in? The manual only shows for the 200 and 400 series. My plate is also the late production with only 4 holes.

The PO had it in the first hole which looks wrong.
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The sleeve hitch manual is on the left. The utility blade uses holes 1 and 2 on the right.
123105
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Thanks
 

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I have a sleeve hitch and hooked mine up without directions. I have a 224 and think I started with it in #4. I found that the tiller would just barely clear and occasionally drag on flat ground, so I moved it to #6 and now all is good. The #2 hole should provide you with greater lift.
 

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I hooked up my sleeve hitch to my 448 w/o directions. And it wasn't too bad. However, I was loading the tractor on the trailer between gardens, and it was common to drag on the ramp for the trailer. Just switched holes on the plate and while going in the ground well, it still cleared the ramp of my trailer w/o dragging.

Bill Moyer
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have a sleeve hitch and hooked mine up without directions. I have a 224 and think I started with it in #4. I found that the tiller would just barely clear and occasionally drag on flat ground, so I moved it to #6 and now all is good. The #2 hole should provide you with greater lift.
Thanks for the response. I tried moving it to whole #2 and got much better lift, but sadly it just barely hits the bracket on the back to tow a dump cart with. I noticed the hole in the lift extension plate is worn oblong, and the thick metal pin on the arm that goes back to the hitch has a deep groove worn in it. Looks like someone would have to weld it and a machine shop would have to grind it true? Or maybe I can drill the hole out and somehow rig up a bushing. I hate linkages like these without bushings or bearings, they never seem to last. Someone must have used this sleeve hitch a ton. The back mounting points have some play too and the hitch sits slightly lower on the left side.

-Ron
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I hooked up my sleeve hitch to my 448 w/o directions. And it wasn't too bad. However, I was loading the tractor on the trailer between gardens, and it was common to drag on the ramp for the trailer. Just switched holes on the plate and while going in the ground well, it still cleared the ramp of my trailer w/o dragging.

Bill Moyer
I agree, the tiller would drag easy. Sadly with hole #2 the hitch barely makes contact with the bracket for towing a dump cart when pulled all the way up.

-Ron
 

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I agree, the tiller would drag easy. Sadly with hole #2 the hitch barely makes contact with the bracket for towing a dump cart when pulled all the way up.

-Ron
I made an adapter for the sleeve hitch that fits a trailer ball and a tab to tow carts. I don't worry about marrying a cart to the sleeve hitch/towing bracket.
 

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Here's the hitch adaptor I made for the sleeve hitch. This has the benefit of putting the the hitch back far enough to make backing the cart much easier, But keep in mind a trailer that is too tung heavy (car hauler trailer) can make the front of the tractor get light and loose steering ability.

123122


As to the sleeve hitch sitting lower on the left, this is fairly common. Since the lift arm on the hitch is on the right side and the hitch is somewhat on the lightside. A tiller with the side mount motor puts that extra weight on the left side, even a tiller with a center mount motor can twist the hitch if the tractor is run at high speed with the tiller in the air and bouncing around.

Cheers,
Gordy
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I made an adapter for the sleeve hitch that fits a trailer ball and a tab to tow carts. I don't worry about marrying a cart to the sleeve hitch/towing bracket.
Gotcha. When I have it in hole 2, the bracket barely hits the tow bracket mounted to the transmission. See the arrows. Did you remove that bracket? Thanks.
123123
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Here's the hitch adaptor I made for the sleeve hitch. This has the benefit of putting the the hitch back far enough to make backing the cart much easier, But keep in mind a trailer that is too tung heavy (car hauler trailer) can make the front of the tractor get light and loose steering ability.

View attachment 123122

As to the sleeve hitch sitting lower on the left, this is fairly common. Since the lift arm on the hitch is on the right side and the hitch is somewhat on the lightside. A tiller with the side mount motor puts that extra weight on the left side, even a tiller with a center mount motor can twist the hitch if the tractor is run at high speed with the tiller in the air and bouncing around.

Cheers,
Gordy
Thanks for all the great info Gordy, I am sure the mounting holes are also worn and that contributes to the lean as well ( I can push the hitch to the left and it becomes level). I never got why they didn't uses bushings or bearings in these applications, unless you manually grease the pivots yourself they will all wear out. I originally purchased a machine with the 3 point and the f27 sleeve hitch adapter so I was going to get the ball hitch you showed me, but I nearly got ripped off on the machine and thankfully got my money back. The one I found just has the sleeve hitch. I noticed the tiller sits really low when pulled all the way up. I tried moving the lift arm to hole #2 as mentioned above, but the hitch makes contact with this bracket attached to the tranny meant to tow dump carts. Should I just remove that bracket? My hydraulic hoses stick out nearly straight so I'm not sure if they would bend if the tiller was lifted more. I noticed the hole in the lift arm extension bracket is worn oblong and the lift arm pin has a bad groove worn in it, so theoretically it no longer lifts as high as it should in hole #1. Do you have any suggestions as to have the pin welded and ground circular again? or maybe drill the hole out and add a bushing? Thanks, Ron.
123124
 

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Here's the hitch adaptor I made for the sleeve hitch. This has the benefit of putting the the hitch back far enough to make backing the cart much easier, But keep in mind a trailer that is too tung heavy (car hauler trailer) can make the front of the tractor get light and loose steering ability.

View attachment 123122

As to the sleeve hitch sitting lower on the left, this is fairly common. Since the lift arm on the hitch is on the right side and the hitch is somewhat on the lightside. A tiller with the side mount motor puts that extra weight on the left side, even a tiller with a center mount motor can twist the hitch if the tractor is run at high speed with the tiller in the air and bouncing around.

Cheers,
Gordy
Mine looks similar... and I have done a wheelie or two. My adapter started with a simple L angle so that it pinned at the top. Then going up a hill towing water:

123125


The pins pulled out. The next day an L was added to the bottom to create a C like yours. :)
 

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Thanks for all the great info Gordy, I am sure the mounting holes are also worn and that contributes to the lean as well ( I can push the hitch to the left and it becomes level). I never got why they didn't uses bushings or bearings in these applications, unless you manually grease the pivots yourself they will all wear out. I originally purchased a machine with the 3 point and the f27 sleeve hitch adapter so I was going to get the ball hitch you showed me, but I nearly got ripped off on the machine and thankfully got my money back. The one I found just has the sleeve hitch. I noticed the tiller sits really low when pulled all the way up. I tried moving the lift arm to hole #2 as mentioned above, but the hitch makes contact with this bracket attached to the tranny meant to tow dump carts. Should I just remove that bracket? My hydraulic hoses stick out nearly straight so I'm not sure if they would bend if the tiller was lifted more. I noticed the hole in the lift arm extension bracket is worn oblong and the lift arm pin has a bad groove worn in it, so theoretically it no longer lifts as high as it should in hole #1. Do you have any suggestions as to have the pin welded and ground circular again? or maybe drill the hole out and add a bushing? Thanks, Ron.
View attachment 123124
My sleeve hitch is a bit different and does not hit the standard hitch bracket. Certainly it could be removed. I left mine on as if I want to pull small stumps with a chain I hook it to that bracket instead of the sleeve hitch.
 

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Thanks for all the great info Gordy, I am sure the mounting holes are also worn and that contributes to the lean as well ( I can push the hitch to the left and it becomes level). I never got why they didn't uses bushings or bearings in these applications, unless you manually grease the pivots yourself they will all wear out. I originally purchased a machine with the 3 point and the f27 sleeve hitch adapter so I was going to get the ball hitch you showed me, but I nearly got ripped off on the machine and thankfully got my money back. The one I found just has the sleeve hitch. I noticed the tiller sits really low when pulled all the way up. I tried moving the lift arm to hole #2 as mentioned above, but the hitch makes contact with this bracket attached to the tranny meant to tow dump carts. Should I just remove that bracket? My hydraulic hoses stick out nearly straight so I'm not sure if they would bend if the tiller was lifted more. I noticed the hole in the lift arm extension bracket is worn oblong and the lift arm pin has a bad groove worn in it, so theoretically it no longer lifts as high as it should in hole #1. Do you have any suggestions as to have the pin welded and ground circular again? or maybe drill the hole out and add a bushing? Thanks, Ron.
If I understood correctly, you said the pins and holes for the sleeve hitch mount are worn, that would explain why the why the two are touching. The OEM trailer hitch can be removed, the mounting holes are blind, not through holes into the axle so oil will not come out. I am setup with a welder grinders.........., so I would repair the holes and pins. As you noticed it still works, so weld on the pins can be just ground by eye, no need for actual machining them perfectly round as long as they are a close fit in the holes.

As to bushings how old is your machine? My 224-78 may not have seen as heavy of use as yours, but at 43 years old the pins and holes are not too bad let. So how far you go is up to you and how hard you are going to be using it.

Your profile does not show where are you located, if you add that. Maybe someone close to you could help you out. I have done many repairs like this for neighbors.

Cheers,
Gordy
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
If I understood correctly, you said the pins and holes for the sleeve hitch mount are worn, that would explain why the why the two are touching. The OEM trailer hitch can be removed, the mounting holes are blind, not through holes into the axle so oil will not come out. I am setup with a welder grinders.........., so I would repair the holes and pins. As you noticed it still works, so weld on the pins can be just ground by eye, no need for actual machining them perfectly round as long as they are a close fit in the holes.

As to bushings how old is your machine? My 224-78 may not have seen as heavy of use as yours, but at 43 years old the pins and holes are not too bad let. So how far you go is up to you and how hard you are going to be using it.

Your profile does not show where are you located, if you add that. Maybe someone close to you could help you out. I have done many repairs like this for neighbors.

Cheers,
Gordy
Yes, the bottom pins have some side to side play. I sadly do not have a welder but have a die grinder for my compressor. You are right, it isn't an axle, I bet I could file it and sand pretty smooth. The oblong hold would be a little harder. For bushings I meant drilling out the holes and adding a bushing of some sort so it isn't just metal pin on metal bracket. The machine has 729 hours on it, believe its a 1990 (new for me compared to my '64 landlord and '68 allis b110). I just ripped all of the steering and front axle apart to install the improved pin design and to thoroughly degrease, clean, and relubricate the king pins, axle bushings, etc. There is very minimal wear and no play in the steering up front, PO took really good care of the machine. I am guessing the hitch was used a lot.

My only concern with leaving the hitch on is when I use the mower deck and lower it, I don't want the hitch dragging on the ground. The PO would disconnect the lift arm and use a long carriage bolt to hold the sleeve hitch all the way up when mowing so he didn't have to remove it. I added my location to my profile.

Thanks again Gordy,
Ron
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
My sleeve hitch is a bit different and does not hit the standard hitch bracket. Certainly it could be removed. I left mine on as if I want to pull small stumps with a chain I hook it to that bracket instead of the sleeve hitch.
Gotcha, I suppose I could remove it. I may try to repair the slop like Gordy suggested if I can find a reasonable welder.

-Ron
 

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Any welding/fab shop could repair the hole for you.

Take a look at the before and after pics of the one I recently repaired. Machined an insert and welded it in.
123138


123139
 

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Your rear hitch on the rear axle should align with the slotted hole on the sleeve hitch. Throw a clevis pin or nut/bolt on and leave the sleeve hitch in place. Then take the arm off. I wish there was a way case/ingersoll had seperation in the mid lift. Meaning a way you could have unhooked the rear sleeve arm to mid lift for mowing and easily reattached the lift arm to mid lift for rear end work.

Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk
 

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My only concern with leaving the hitch on is when I use the mower deck and lower it, I don't want the hitch dragging on the ground. The PO would disconnect the lift arm and use a long carriage bolt to hold the sleeve hitch all the way up when mowing so he didn't have to remove it. I added my location to my profile.
Flip up the seat, look at the top of the fuel tanks rear corners. My 224 has gaps between the tank and the rear support in the corners, I hooked 3/16" S hook's in the openings and attached 1/4" chain to the hooks, down around the sleeve hitch and back up to the S hooks. This allowed me to remove the link arm and use the snow blower with out the sleeve hitch moving. Also with the sleeve hitch chained up level, it made a good platform for stacking concrete blocks for added traction on the snow and ice. Of course being down south you'd probably be carrying a cooler of beverages instead ;)

Cheers,
Gordy
 
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