Case Colt Ingersoll Tractors banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,052 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Mine does the same thing. Im willing to be its just worn out. The dash lever should NOT be lubricated at all.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,373 Posts
Hopefully Mad Mackie will jump on here with the solution that was discussed regarding Tom (goldencove's) tractor. If I am not completely insane, I think I remember that there was a rebuild procedure that eliminated this problem.

You already know my solution, a sawed-off 5B drumstick beveled on one end and jammed into the slot behind the throttle lever. Not perfect but works well in a pinch.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,618 Posts
This is a common complaint on older tractors but it's just a wear and tear issue. The throttle gets used the most so it's always the one owners complain about.

The solution is simple. Undo the two bolts that secure them both to the dash and remove the throttle lever assembly to the workbench. If you look at it, you will see that there's a riveted shaft that the lever pivots on. The friction disc has worn down over time. The solution is to hold the smooth head of the rivet against the anvil you should have in your shop. Then you use a 9 3/16" long piece of 1/2" steel rod that is flat on both ends as a punch. You put one end against the splayed end of the rivet and give the other end a tap. Now I use the word tap for a reason because a light tap that does nothing is better than a heavy tap that causes the lever to jamb tight.

Use your head to think with. Try a light tap and then tap a bit harder until you get it stiffened up to the point where you like it. Check after each tap. Take your time.

If you have the throttle with the nut/bolt pivot then do I have to tell you what to do? :sidelaugh: :sidelaugh:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,125 Posts
If like myself you are a lazy- non purist type of guy, I suggest leaving the lever set in place and using a hacksaw blade to remove the stock rivet and substituting a 1/4" bolt /fiber washers/ and nylock nut. Requires battery removal but it can be easily readjusted later to compensate for future wear. Fast & easy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
Morning guys,

I had to change the throttle cable on my 446 because the previous owner put the wrong one on. I bought a used set from boomer and it was already modified with the nut and bolt with fiber washer that works very well. I was able to easily take photos because the PO also cut an access panel in the tower to change the cable...but don't worry Brad, I have the piece he cut out! :crazy:







You can also see the choke cable lever and the rivet attachment. As Tom said a few taps on that rivet will do the jobjust as well.

:letitsnow:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,348 Posts
Tom's

FWIW

The modified throttle cable you got from boomer is not modified. LOL

That cable is the OEM replacement for our tractors and is the best remedy for a walking throttle.

Adding a bolt to an old cable would be my second choice as it is a shorter term fix.

Tightening up an old worn out rivet with a tap is suitable for a collectors unit but since some of us expect to

use our workers for many years, unless you enjoy the experience of pulling this cable again I recommend to

give Brian H a call

Stewart
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
Stewart,

Thanks for the info. I had just assumed the cable had been modified due to throttle walk :thumbsup: My tractor definatley has to earn its keep here at Golden Cove...especially today with the snow piling up!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,618 Posts
Stewart said:
Tom's

FWIW

The modified throttle cable you got from boomer is not modified. LOL

That cable is the OEM replacement for our tractors and is the best remedy for a walking throttle.

Adding a bolt to an old cable would be my second choice as it is a shorter term fix.

Tightening up an old worn out rivet with a tap is suitable for a collectors unit but since some of us expect to

use our workers for many years, unless you enjoy the experience of pulling this cable again I recommend to

give Brian H a call

Stewart
There's no question that buying new is a solution.

However, how about this?

It took twenty or more years of use for your existing throttle lever to begin walking on its own and the only reason it's doing that is because the rivet doesn't apply the needed pressure on the brake disc. Peening the rivet tighter restores that pressure. Therefore it should be good for another 20 years because there's usually a lot of disc material left.

After all, we do clutch adjustments to compensate for disc wear and we do brake adjustments to correct the loss of lining, do we not? It is not difficult to inspect the disc condition just as we inspect clutch discs and brake bands.

:thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,129 Posts
The only way I have fixed these cables it the peening method that Tom describes. I don't ever remember redoing one. The only downside is if you get a little to aggressive and the throttle is a little stiff. You may want to order a new cable so you have one down the road when the friction disc finally wears out. My experiance is that this will happen at the worst possable time. Gregg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,348 Posts
Hydriv said:
Stewart said:
Tom's

FWIW

The modified throttle cable you got from boomer is not modified. LOL

That cable is the OEM replacement for our tractors and is the best remedy for a walking throttle.

Adding a bolt to an old cable would be my second choice as it is a shorter term fix.

Tightening up an old worn out rivet with a tap is suitable for a collectors unit but since some of us expect to

use our workers for many years, unless you enjoy the experience of pulling this cable again I recommend to

give Brian H a call

Stewart
There's no question that buying new is a solution.

However, how about this?

It took twenty or more years of use for your existing throttle lever to begin walking on its own and the only reason it's doing that is because the rivet doesn't apply the needed pressure on the brake disc. Peening the rivet tighter restores that pressure. Therefore it should be good for another 20 years because there's usually a lot of disc material left.

After all, we do clutch adjustments to compensate for disc wear and we do brake adjustments to correct the loss of lining, do we not? It is not difficult to inspect the disc condition just as we inspect clutch discs and brake bands.

:thumbsup:
I think that the rivet is shouldered and by peening you get an improvement but I would be surprised if you would get another 20 years. Only time will tell. :thumbsup:

I adjust my clutch and brakes with adjusters that the Factory installed just like Ingersoll installed the adjuster in the new style Throttle Cable. :trink:

HHmmm Wonder if I can Peen the loose rivets on my clutch Disk.? :sidelaugh: :sidelaugh: :sidelaugh:

Stewart
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,618 Posts
You are correct that the rivet is shouldered but even if you only get ten years...isn't that enough. :sidelaugh:

If you whack it too hard, you won't be able to move the lever. That alone tells me that there is some leeway to tighten the assembly up. As always, we can make suggestions but it's up to the OP to decide on what works for him/her.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,348 Posts
Hydriv said:
You are correct that the rivet is shouldered but even if you only get ten years...isn't that enough. :sidelaugh:

If you whack it too hard, you won't be able to move the lever. That alone tells me that there is some leeway to tighten the assembly up. As always, we can make suggestions but it's up to the OP to decide on what works for him/her.
OOoops I hit the wrong button, can I delete my thanks :sidelaugh: :sidelaugh:

10 Years might be long enough for you but a young man like myself requires a longer term fix. :thumbsup:

As always the budget will determine the repair and if I hadn't drilled my old Throttle to see if the rivet was shouldered I could of given it a tap and sold it on E-Bay. :sidelaugh: :sidelaugh: :sidelaugh:

Stewart :trink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
I already like this forum way better than the mtf forum. I had this problem be never came across the answer there.

Since I was familiar with the tractor controls from being a kid, I would line up my snowcaster shoot, start forward movement, and throttle down. This would take a couple of hands and lots of attention, it worked last winter. But my woman said one day that she figured she would not be blowing snow with this tractor. I am trying to get the entire tractor tight enough that she could, even though I would not let. To much fun.

I will get with Brian H. to get the new bolted adjustment type throttle lever.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
3,188 Posts
You can remove it and bang it with a hammer or remove the rivet and the crumbling friction washer and install a fine threaded bolt, another type of washer and a locknut. Then you don't have to use a piece of pipe to move the throttle lever if you hit the rivet too hard!!!!
While you have the throttle lever out, you can put a full throttle detent in it. Move the throttle lever to the full position and mark the support. Pull the lever back and using a centerpunch, make a bump in the metal that will somewhat stop the lever from creeping back from the full position. Or you can drill a hole and install a #4 button head screw and nut to accomplish the same thing. This winter I had to R&R the throttle cable on my 1990 4018 and discovered the full throttle detent. I also removed the rivet and installed a hex bolt and locknut.
When adjusting a throttle cable, you must hold the engine governor at full throttle, hold the throttle lever at full and then secure the cable adjusting screw on the engine. If you fail to do this then there is a possibility the the engine will never get to full throttle. The throttle idle position will be where ever it ends up and it may not be all the way to the bottom of the travel.
Mad Mackie in CT :mowlawn:
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top