Case Colt Ingersoll Tractors banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
650 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What's a decent price for rear tires for a 446?

I checked at my local tire shop that I do business with and they gave me price of $135 each for 8-16's R1 (AG) 6 ply tires. Price include mounting and road hazard repair.

How is that on par with some of the online deals? Seems that by buying them online and paying shipping not to mention mounting since 6 ply tires are little difficult to mount by hand, $270 for a pair doesn't seem too bad.

My turf treads hold air, a little weather cracked in the tread and at least one has a tube in it. It would be nice to find an extra pair of rims and have both regular and turf tires.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
That is not a bad price at all since they are going to mount them for you. This past fall I bought a set for my 190 from an ebay dealer (Rustybore Tire Store) in Pennsylvania for $120 each + $25 to ship the pair. Miller Tire has 8-16 Carlisles on ebay right now for $140 + $39.54 shipping each. Your deal looks pretty good compared to that!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
650 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
InTroubleAlltheTime said:
E Boy Dog What brand tires are they?
:222: :446: Best Regards, Rich
Harvest King which is by a company called Eldorado? I was told they are made by Kelly Springfield?

Have not seen the tires, they have to get them from their warehouse which I told them I had to seem them first before they put them on, they need a few days notice to get them if I say OK.

http://www.tbcprivatebrands.com/harvest ... asp?id=260

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
650 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Bill.H said:
4th guy in this thread said his Harvest King tires had Made in China on them. :cry: Too bad, 'cause that's a nice price. I'm looking too.
After a little more googling I think you are right and that is a big problem.

I'm one of those who hasn't stepped into Walmart fon over 8 years, I will not support China workers while unemployment in the United States is at an all time high short of the depression of the 30's. If these tires are in fact made in China then I'm not buying them, it may cost me more but my American made tractor will have Americian made shoes on it. :usa:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,211 Posts
Who cares where they are made. Its the tire that provides the best value for you

Like you said, I would definately buy the USA tires. They at most cost 50% more? and wont be dry cracking in 48 months LOL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
568 Posts
mikebramel said:
Who cares where they are made. Its the tire that provides the best value for you

Like you said, I would definately buy the USA tires. They at most cost 50% more? and wont be dry cracking in 48 months LOL
I care. I worked my ass off at a tire plant that made tractor tires, and we went out of business after several rounds of concessions.
Some Chinese companies make decent quality tires, but from inside the industry I can tell you that many are inferior at best and dangerous at worst.
John
PS-Mike, thanks for deciding to buy American tires, I don't intend this to be a personal attack, I just needed to vent.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
568 Posts
99flhr said:
Paid $133 each for Carlisle Farm Specialist R-1`s from a local dealer. Mounting extra

I guess I`ll go home and check the sidewall for country of origin
Randy, I'm not sure what the country of origin is on those tires, but when looking at Carlisles, if they are made in China it is marked on the bead of the tire in letters less than 1/8" high.
John
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
3,284 Posts
Bear in mind that R-1 rated tires are considered farm tires and G-1 rated tires are farm and road tires and the G-1 rated tires will give a smoother ride on hard surfaces. I have R-1 rated Titan Ag lugs and they are rough riding, but I'm getting old with a bad lower back!!! :sidelaugh: :sidelaugh:
Mad Mackie in Taxonnecticut :oops: :shock: :mrgreen: :mowlawn:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
When I was ready to buy new ags for my 4016PS, I looked all over & ended up doing a search on Amazon.com to find the best price for my Carlisle R-1's. Miller Tire had the second best price at the time of my order, but the day after I ordered mine, the place I ordered from increased their price to more than Miller's price.

I thought that I was buying American when I ordered my Firestone tri-rib front tires from Miller Tire. When they got here & I looked at them, I was surprised to see "made in Viet Nam" on the sidewalls! I am happy so far with the tires though.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,618 Posts
Guys..... I fully understand the flag waving :usa: :usa: :canada: :canada: and the loyalty to your country and your working-class neighbours.

However, products that are not totally made on North American soil did not arrive there because China, Singapore, Malaysia, Hong Kong, Philippines, Korea etc sent them there blindly in the hopes of selling them. In all cases, an American or Canadian company sourced those items there and imported them. They did that because they knew that the American public is always looking for the best bang for their buck. Walmart is now the largest corporation in the world as a result of the demand by the North American market for lower cost items.

Those of you who refuse to purchase products made off-shore are fighting a losing battle. This continent competes in a global marketplace that is constantly on the lookout for cheap labour to make items it wants. You cannot buy a car, truck or motorcycle today that does not have foreign content in it. And even when you see that "Made in America" label on an item, that does not mean what you think it does. All it means is that the manufacturer has met the criteria set down by the US government to put that label on their goods.

The above has been put in this thread to add some perspective to the focus and it is not an invitation to take the thread political. These are the realities of life today in a rapidly changing world. If you wish to pay more for something because you believe that you are saving jobs around the corner, be my guest. All I can add is that you need to do a lot of research before buying anything today if you intend to buy only products that are 100 percent American or Canadian. Over on MTF, a female member tried to buy shovels, rakes and other hand tools for her landscaping business. Upon investigation, she found out that the metal heads were all imported and the wood handles were added here. That fact allowed the manufacturer to proudly state Made in America on every tool that left the factory.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,445 Posts
In order to steer away from political, even though I have some opinions, they have no value to anyone but me.

BUT, where I do really care about country of origin is in the true value, durability etc of the product.

Thus far, I have found no far eastern rubber goods that meet my standards. Tires, glass gasketing for cars/trucks, plastics etc, all seem to oxidize/weather/rot far faster than the older North American products. Early Japanese cars had these problems. 60's Toyotas and Datsuns used to develop a film on the inside of the windows when setting in the sun with the windows up. Then the dash and seat plastic would crack after a few years. Turns out, the 'plastizer' in the mix that kept the plastic flexible was evaporating, coating the windows with that sticky mess and in turn making the plastic brittle. They learned, the Chinese will too, but I'm not payin' for the education, I'll wait til those products mature.

In addition, tires in particular suffer from shipping issues. They are compressed to the maximum in order to get as many as possible in the shipping container. Good luck on getting them expanded and seated on the wheel without one of the super air machines my local tire shop has.

Not political, just practical.

All that said, I do buy import stuff, particularly specialty tools (sand blaster, super thin wrench set, even large tool boxes) that are just too expensive in the NA versions. Good function, suffer somewhat in fit and finish, but for occasional use they are fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
568 Posts
Protrucker said:
I thought that I was buying American when I ordered my Firestone tri-rib front tires from Miller Tire. When they got here & I looked at them, I was surprised to see "made in Viet Nam" on the sidewalls! I am happy so far with the tires though.
Al, since nobody makes tri-ribs that size in the USA, I had to go with the Firestones also. The soupy ground along the woods line at the back of my property necessitated a tri-rib in order to make the turn past my wood pile (turfs try to go straight-argghhh!). There are some times when it just isn't possible to get certain products that are made here. I will admit my new front tires are working out very well.
John
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,618 Posts
One of the companies in the rubber donut business is Toyo Tire. They are Japanese but in 2004, they opened a one million square foot manufacturing plant and warehousing facility 50 miles north-east of Atlanta, GA in a place called White. In 2008, they doubled the size of that operation.

I also understand that Toyo partnered with Kinugawa Rubber to produce the Nitto brand of tires. I can remember buying Nitto Motocross tires back in the early 80's.

Cheng Shin is a Taiwanese company that makes bicycle, motorcycle, lawnmower and golf course equipment tires as well as ATV tires. Currently, their tires are being manufactured in China.

Maxxis is another Taiwaneese company that makes motorcycle, ATV, bicycle, trailer, go-kart, industrial, automobile, light truck and commercial truck tires. They list a location in China too.


In 1987, Goodyear and Pacific Dunlop Ltd. created South Pacific Tyres Ltd., which manufactures tires in Australia, New Zealand and Papua New Guinea. In 1999, Goodyear merged with Sumitomo Rubber Industries, which owned rights to Dunlop internationally. The merger gave Goodyear further control over Dunlop's operations. Dunlop is currently the only motorcycle tire producer in the United States. Goodyear owns the majority of Dunlop tire facilities around the world. As of 2009, Goodyear controls a 17.2 percent share of the United States tire market. In its six plants in North America, Goodyear has 10,000 employees. Kelley-Springfield is also a Goodyear division.


The one-time illustrious B.F. Goodrich company is wholly-owned by Michelin, a French company. They have 4 plants in the USA, 3 in Canada and 1 in Mexico.

Michelin also owns Riken, Taurus, Kormoran and UniRoyal brands. They have plants in France, Germany, United Kingdom, Brazil, Thailand, Japan, Italy and several other countries that may also include China. Apparently, they are in 19 countries with a total of 64 plants.

In other words, tire manufacturing is a complex issue. You have to rely upon the manufacturer of the tire to produce a decent tire that will give decent service for the money expended. It's hard to build a good reputation but very easy to destroy one.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top