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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
case 222 97223702
how do you remove the travel lever or lift lever from the bottom frame were the spring is?
Also does anybody know what the link is for taking out some of the play in the steering?
thanks
al
 

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anixon92 said:
case 222 97223702

Also does anybody know what the link is for taking out some of the play in the steering?
thanks
al
1. Technical library on this site
2. Service manual section
3. Steering and axle sub-section
4. Steering and axle manual #9050392
 

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anixon92 said:
case 222 97223702
how do you remove the travel lever or lift lever from the bottom frame were the spring is?
Also does anybody know what the link is for taking out some of the play in the steering?
thanks
al
IIRC, the levers are held in place by a washer and cotter pin on the underside of the frame. Push downward (toward the floor) on the lever, compressing the spring, and you will be able to pull the cotter pin. There is a nylon washer that fits in a recess on the top side of the frame that you don't want to lose, also. I don't understand how your second question relates to the first, sorry.
Rob
 

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Rob, I think he's talking about shimming the sector gear. Same manual as above.
Anixon, You may want to check the rod ends on the steering rod also. These can get quite a bit of play in them where the ball fits into the socket.
 

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Anixon92 -

The are several items to check to help eliminate (or minimize) steering looseness. Check these areas -

  • tie rod ends for excessive wear and looseness[/*:m:3bnqejj5]
  • drag link rod ends for excessive wear and looseness[/*:m:3bnqejj5]
  • steering sector shimming to make sure it correctly meshes the sector gear teeth with the steering shaft gear teeth[/*:m:3bnqejj5]
  • excessive wear on the tooth profile for either the steering sector gear teeth and/or the steering shaft gear teeth (steel steering sectors are prone for tooth wear, cast sectors seem to hold up better and are sought after[/*:m:3bnqejj5]
  • if you can grab the steering wheel and can move it side to side without rotating the wheel, that indicates wear in the upper steering shaft bushing installed in the steering shaft tube[/*:m:3bnqejj5]
  • lift the steering wheel to check for up and down movement, if you can move it up and down that indicates excesive wear on the upper steering shaft bushing flange, or missing shims which will not mesh the steering shaft gear teeth with the sector gear correctly[/*:m:3bnqejj5]
  • have someone rotate the steering wheel back and forth while you view the steering shaft rotation through the lower steering shaft/travel lever support (does the shaft rotate true and straight or does the steering shaft rotate in an eccentric manner, moving the shaft gear into and out of the meshed sector gear teeth?)[/*:m:3bnqejj5]

All of these items will contribute to steering "looseness" and sometimes not one item is the culprit. It could be a combination of small amounts of wear in several areas that could cause the problem.
 
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